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Bradford S Bell

Self-regulation

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

Disentangling Achievement Orientation And Goal Setting: Effects On Self-Regulatory Processes, Steve Kozlowski, Bradford Bell May 2011

Disentangling Achievement Orientation And Goal Setting: Effects On Self-Regulatory Processes, Steve Kozlowski, Bradford Bell

Bradford S Bell

The Heckhausen and Kuhl (1985) goal typology provided the conceptual foundation for this research, which examined the independent and integrated effects of achievement orientation and goal setting approaches on trainees’ self-regulatory activity. Using a complex computer-based simulation, the authors examined the effects of three training design factors cutting across these two theoretical domains – goal frame, goal content, and goal proximity – on the nature, focus, and quality of the self-regulatory activities of 524 trainees. Results revealed that all three factors had a significant influence on self-regulation, with goal content exhibiting the greatest influence. In line with expectations, congruent learning frame and ...


Adaptive Guidance: Enhancing Self-Regulation, Knowledge, And Performance In Technology-Based Training, Bradford S. Bell, Steve W. J. Kozlowski Apr 2011

Adaptive Guidance: Enhancing Self-Regulation, Knowledge, And Performance In Technology-Based Training, Bradford S. Bell, Steve W. J. Kozlowski

Bradford S Bell

Considerable research has examined the effects of giving trainees control over their learning (Steinberg, 1977, 1989; Williams, 1993). The most consistent finding of this research has been that trainees do not make good instructional use of the control they are given. Yet, today’s technologically based training systems often provide individuals with significant control over their learning (Brown, 2001). This creates a dilemma that must be addressed if technology is going to be used to create more effective training systems. The current study extended past research that has examined the effects of providing trainees with some form of advisement or ...


A Multilevel Analysis Of The Effect Of Prompting Self-Regulation In Technology-Delivered Instruction, Traci Sitzmann, Bradford S. Bell, Kurt Kraiger, Adam M. Kanar Apr 2011

A Multilevel Analysis Of The Effect Of Prompting Self-Regulation In Technology-Delivered Instruction, Traci Sitzmann, Bradford S. Bell, Kurt Kraiger, Adam M. Kanar

Bradford S Bell

We used a within-subjects design and multilevel modeling in two studies to examine the effect of prompting self-regulation, an intervention designed to improve learning from technology-delivered instruction. The results of two studies indicate trainees who were prompted to self-regulate gradually improved their knowledge and performance over time, relative to the control condition. In addition, Study 2 demonstrated that trainees’ cognitive ability and self-efficacy moderated the effect of the prompts. Prompting self-regulation resulted in stronger learning gains over time for trainees with higher ability or higher self-efficacy. Overall, the two studies demonstrate that prompting self-regulation had a gradual, positive effect on ...


A Multilevel Analysis Of The Effects Of Technical Interruptions On Learning And Attrition From Web-Based Instruction, Traci Sitzmann, Katherine Ely, Bradford S. Bell, Kristina Bauer Apr 2011

A Multilevel Analysis Of The Effects Of Technical Interruptions On Learning And Attrition From Web-Based Instruction, Traci Sitzmann, Katherine Ely, Bradford S. Bell, Kristina Bauer

Bradford S Bell

As training is increasingly integrated in the workplace and embedded in work technology, trainees are confronted by a variety of workplace and technological interruptions. This article presents a conceptual framework characterizing different types of interruptions and the extent to which they disrupt learning. A longitudinal design was then used to examine the effects of one form of interruption — technical difficulties — on trainees’ (N = 530) self-regulatory processes, learning, and attrition from Web-based instruction. Test scores were 1.33 points lower (out of 20) in modules where trainees encountered technical difficulties. Technical difficulties also had differential effects on attrition rates over time ...