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Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

Lesbian

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Full-Text Articles in Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

Testing The “Learning Journey” Of Msw Students In A Rural Program, Misty L. Wall, Will Rainford Jan 2013

Testing The “Learning Journey” Of Msw Students In A Rural Program, Misty L. Wall, Will Rainford

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

Using a quasi-experimental one-group, pretest–posttest design with non-random convenience sampling, the researchers assessed 61 advanced standing MSW students who matriculated at a rural intermountain Northwest school of social work. Changes in students' knowledge and attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people were measured using subscales of the LGB-KASH scale and include knowledge of LGB history, religious conflict, internalized affirmation of LGB people and issues, hatred and violence toward LGB people, and knowledge and attitudes toward extension and exclusion of civil rights for LGB people. Completion of required, highly experiential bridge course content regarding LGB history and experience appears ...


Hearing The Voices Of Lesbian Women Having Children, Misty Wall Jan 2011

Hearing The Voices Of Lesbian Women Having Children, Misty Wall

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

Whether single, or in the context of a lesbian relationship, lesbian women are choosing to become mothers, often through adoption. The path of lesbian women choosing motherhood is fraught with challenges and often disappointments (Martin, 1993, Oswald, 2002, Perrin, 2002, Stacey, 1996). In the United States, women are still very much socialized to want to be mothers and the desire to be a mother is not contradicted by sexual orientation (DiLapi, 1989; Dalton & Bielby, 2000). However, lesbian women receive messages that they should not want to be mothers and that they cannot be adequate mothers (DiLapi. 1989; Pies, 1990). Women who self identify as lesbian must negotiate the norms and expectations of a heterocentric and homophobic culture. Thus, for lesbian women, choosing motherhood requires ...