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Communication

Information and library science

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Full-Text Articles in Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

Steps Toward A Socio-Technical Categorization Scheme For Communication And Information Standards, Joann Brooks, Anne W. Rawls Jan 2012

Steps Toward A Socio-Technical Categorization Scheme For Communication And Information Standards, Joann Brooks, Anne W. Rawls

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Socio-technical systems continue to grow larger and more complex, comprising increasingly significant portions of contemporary society. Yet systematic understanding of interrelationships between social and technological elements remains elusive, even as computers and information systems proliferate. In this paper, we draw on ethnomethodology to distinguish several different kinds of processes through which communication and information are constituted. We discuss the distinctive properties of each in an effort to develop systematic understanding of basic elements of socio-technical systems. In particular, we offer a basic categorization of communication and information standards, noting the constitutive importance of their accompanying social practices. Implications for theory ...


Theorizing Embodied Communicative Organizing: Fleshing Out Genre With Goffman’S Situational View, Joann Brooks Jan 2011

Theorizing Embodied Communicative Organizing: Fleshing Out Genre With Goffman’S Situational View, Joann Brooks

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Understanding Virtuality: Contributions From Goffman’S "Frame Analysis", Joann Brooks Jan 2007

Understanding Virtuality: Contributions From Goffman’S "Frame Analysis", Joann Brooks

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Virtual interactions are normally assumed to be separate and distinct from the “real world,” yet they are also situated within material reality. In this paper I propose that a situated approach to understanding virtuality can be developed through drawing from Goffman’s Frame Analysis (1974/1986). I explain how Goffman’s terminology and concepts afford a way of integrating the study of virtual interaction with the study of social interaction more generally. His frame analysis approach offers constructs useful for distinguishing virtual worlds from each other and from real worlds in a way that is consonant with perspectives on human-computer ...