Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1969

Oral History

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

It is possible to distinguish three groups of writers on African folklore: first, amateurs, like missionaries, government officials, and African traditiophiles; second, non-African professional scholars, mainly anthropologists and linguists, and, third, their African colleagues. The main difference between these last two groups is that the Africans automatically have the inside view of their culture. They know the answers even before posing the research questions. At the same time, like their fellow anthropologists and linguists, they are equipped with the analytical concepts and methods which enable them to discuss and present this knowledge in a systematic form. Their works are potential ...


Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Folklorists should have special interest in this volume. The Hausa people comprise one of the largest tribes in West Africa, located in present day Northern Nigeria and the adjoining parts of the Republic of Niger. Their contact with the Islamic tradition, their pursuit of trade and travel and the wide currency of their language, a true lingua franca around Hausaland, are all factors which contribute to the special significance of Hausa oral tradition. It blends indigenous African elements with Islamic themes, and serves as a meeting point for narratives of several West African tribes.


Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Until recently, it was still possible for Godfrey Lienhardt, one of the general editors of The Oxford Library of African Literature, to comment that there was no good and convincing account of adults sitting together in an African village, telling stories for entertainment. (The New African, 1966: 124.) At long last, here is a book which provides exactly that: a convincing description of adult African villagers telling stories to each other as recently as our own decade. The tales they exchange are not a negligible part of their culture, a degenerated, barely remembered tradition. On the contrary, among the Limba ...