Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1969

Arts and Humanities

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

Hasidim As People: Review Of Jerome Mintz, Legends Of The Hasidim: An Introduction To Hasidic Culture And Oral Tradition In The New World, Dan Ben-Amos Aug 1969

Hasidim As People: Review Of Jerome Mintz, Legends Of The Hasidim: An Introduction To Hasidic Culture And Oral Tradition In The New World, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Literature about Hasidism in English is one of three kinds: scholarly articles which analyze the history and philosophy of Hasidism on the basis of early documents, selective anthologies of tales and legends which perpetuate the conventional image of Hasidic literature, and popular discussions of Hasidic life and lore which portray the Hasidim as joyful mystics who guard traditional Judaism from the threat of modernity.


Review Of Raphael Patai, Man And Temple In Jewish Myth And Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Raphael Patai, Man And Temple In Jewish Myth And Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Patai's Man and Temple was originally researched and written during the thirties and the forties, when the myth and ritual approach to the study of religions was at its peak.


Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

It is possible to distinguish three groups of writers on African folklore: first, amateurs, like missionaries, government officials, and African traditiophiles; second, non-African professional scholars, mainly anthropologists and linguists, and, third, their African colleagues. The main difference between these last two groups is that the Africans automatically have the inside view of their culture. They know the answers even before posing the research questions. At the same time, like their fellow anthropologists and linguists, they are equipped with the analytical concepts and methods which enable them to discuss and present this knowledge in a systematic form. Their works are potential ...


Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Folklorists should have special interest in this volume. The Hausa people comprise one of the largest tribes in West Africa, located in present day Northern Nigeria and the adjoining parts of the Republic of Niger. Their contact with the Islamic tradition, their pursuit of trade and travel and the wide currency of their language, a true lingua franca around Hausaland, are all factors which contribute to the special significance of Hausa oral tradition. It blends indigenous African elements with Islamic themes, and serves as a meeting point for narratives of several West African tribes.


Review Of Moses Gaster, The Exempla Of The Rabbis; Being A Collection Of Exempla, Apologues And Tales Culled From Hebrew Manuscripts And Rare Hebrew Books, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Moses Gaster, The Exempla Of The Rabbis; Being A Collection Of Exempla, Apologues And Tales Culled From Hebrew Manuscripts And Rare Hebrew Books, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Among the numerous folkloristic publications of Moses Gaster (1856-1939)m The Exempla of the Rabbis stands out as a major contribution that has withstood controversy and new developments in scholarship. It is a standard work in Jewish folklore and a basic tool for research in haggadic-midrashic literature; moreover, Gaster's extensive erudite annotation and abundant references to European and Asian traditions make the book indispensable for folktale research in general. It has long been out of print, and this new edition is a timely publication.


Review Of Raphael Patai, The Hebrew Goddess, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Raphael Patai, The Hebrew Goddess, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In this work Patai proposes to trace the historical development of the female deity in Jewish religion and mysticism. He bases his study of this figure on anthropological-psychological theory and substantiates his ideas with a battery of archeological, historical, cultural, and literary evidence assembled chronologically. Occasionally Patai resorts to comparative methodology.


Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Until recently, it was still possible for Godfrey Lienhardt, one of the general editors of The Oxford Library of African Literature, to comment that there was no good and convincing account of adults sitting together in an African village, telling stories for entertainment. (The New African, 1966: 124.) At long last, here is a book which provides exactly that: a convincing description of adult African villagers telling stories to each other as recently as our own decade. The tales they exchange are not a negligible part of their culture, a degenerated, barely remembered tradition. On the contrary, among the Limba ...