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Full-Text Articles in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

The Pedagogical Needs Of Children And Adults Living In The Calais Jungle Refugee Camp: Existential Issues And Perspectives Of Volunteer Teachers And Workers, Theresa C. Bodon, Nancy K. Votteler Sep 2017

The Pedagogical Needs Of Children And Adults Living In The Calais Jungle Refugee Camp: Existential Issues And Perspectives Of Volunteer Teachers And Workers, Theresa C. Bodon, Nancy K. Votteler

FIRE: Forum for International Research in Education

This study aimed at examining the pedagogical needs and challenges of children and young adults living in a refugee camp in France known as the Calais Jungle. Through the researchers’ observations and interviews with volunteer teachers and workers at the camp, insights into their perspectives shed light on the pedagogical needs of refugees. Also, utilizing Paulo Freire’s philosophical stance, this study provides a contextual approach to the educational practices and ideological viewpoints represented within unregulated refugee camp settings.


The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas Sep 2016

The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas

Journal of Global Catholicism

This article presents a feminist analysis of patriarchy persisting in Catholicism of the Syro-Malabar rite in Kerala. The article specifically considers the impact of charismatic Catholicism on women of the Syro-Malabar rite and argues that it is important to interrogate this new face of religiosity in order to fully understand how certain rituals are allowed to change and be fluid, while others, especially concerning female sexuality, are enshrined as “tradition” which often restricts the parameters for women’s empowerment and may reinforce caste and patriarchal hegemonies preventing feminist solidarity across different religious- and caste-based groups.


Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2014

Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

A literacy divide runs deep in Jewish society. The scribes, the priests, and the prophets who wrote the Bible referred to the folk on the other side of the divide as ha-'am (the people), and the sages, who taught the books that followed, called them 'olam (the world population). Both terms resonate in subsequent Jewish languages. The Yiddish word 'amkha (all the people), and its analogue in Judeo-Spanish, povlacho, have their roots in the Bible where the concept of the "people" is ubiquitous. It occurs in a variety of forms as kol ha-'am (all the people), 'am ha- ...


A Definition Of Folklore: A Personal Narrative, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2014

A Definition Of Folklore: A Personal Narrative, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

My definition of folklore as "artistic communication in small groups" was forged in the context of folklore studies of the 1960s, in the discontent with the definitions that were current at the time, and under the influence of anthropology, linguistics - particularly 'the ethnography of speaking' - and Russian formalism. My field research among the Edo people of Nigeria had a formative impact upon my conception of folklore, when I observed their storytellers, singers, dancers and diviners in performance. The response to the definition was initially negative, or at best ambivalent, but as time passed, it took a more positive turn.


Straparola: The Revolution That Was Not, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2010

Straparola: The Revolution That Was Not, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Inspired by Ruth Bottigheimer's 2002 book, Fairy Godfather: Straparola, Venice, and the Fairy Tale Tradition, this article examines her proposition that the sixteenth-century Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola invented the "rise tale," in which a lowly hero or heroine climbs the socioeconomic ladder with the help of a magical benefactor. It investigates Bottigheimer's evidence for this claim as well as her argument that Straparola's literary invention was a projection of the emerging Italian middles class in the sixteenth century. Contrary to Bottigheimer's proposition, it is found that tales with similar form were told in classical Greece ...


Introduction: The European Fairy-Tale Tradition Between Orality And Literacy, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2010

Introduction: The European Fairy-Tale Tradition Between Orality And Literacy, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In Fairy Godfather: Straparola, Venice, and the Fairy Tale Tradition Ruth Bottingheimer proposes to correct the historical narrative of the emergence of the fairy tale in Europe and to recognize "Straparola's role as an originator in the history of modern fairy tale" (Bottingheimer 2002:3). Giovanni Francesco Straparola (c. 1480-c. 1557) is not exactly an unknown figure in folktale history.1 His book, Le piacevoli notti (Pleasant nights), which appeared in English as The Nights of Straparola (Straparola [1551-1553] 1894), was long recognized as a predecessor of Giambattista Basile's Lo cunto de li cunti (The tale of tales ...


Elijah The Prophet, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2008

Elijah The Prophet, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

or Eliyohu hanovi, was the most popular biblical figure in Jewish folklore in Eastern Europe. The oral traditions of late antiquity established the narrative foundation upon which his image would develop; his name also occurs in proverbs and songs. Elijah is said to make an invisible appearance during the Passover Seder, when a special cup of wine is poured in his honor, and at circumcision ceremonies, when a special chair is reserved for him.


On The Story Of The Judeo-Spanish Folktale. Review Of Tamar Alexander-Fraser, A Beloved Friend-And-A-Half, Studies In Sephardic Folk Literature, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2003

On The Story Of The Judeo-Spanish Folktale. Review Of Tamar Alexander-Fraser, A Beloved Friend-And-A-Half, Studies In Sephardic Folk Literature, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

No abstract provided.


The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2000

The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In 1970, when Ruth Finnegan published her ground-breaking book Oral Literature in Africa, she devoted extensive chapters to prose narratives, proverbs, riddles, and praise poetry. She did not neglect forms in African folklore that at the time were barely studied, such as children's songs and rhymes, But to the epic she allocated in her massive book of over 550 pages only two-and-a-half pages that she set aside at the conclusion of her chapter on "Poetry and Patronage" under the title "A Note on 'Epic'" (Finnegan 1970: 108-10). Probably having in mind the works of the Chadwicks and Bowra, she ...


"A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration: A Review Article", Review Of Linda Dégh, Narratives In Society: A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1998

"A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration: A Review Article", Review Of Linda Dégh, Narratives In Society: A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

An Hungarian in America, Linda Dégh lives the ideal of a Malinowskian fieldworker. After immigrating to the United States and joining the faculty of the famous Folklore Institute at Indiana University in the 60s, she has become a participant in and an observer of American life, conducting research among native Midwesterners and Hungarian immigrants in towns like Bloomington, Evansville, Indiana, as well as the highly industrial Calumet Region, particularly in Gary, Indiana. Dégh arrived in the United States as a mature and accomplished scholar, after conducting extensive field research in her native Hungary, and winning the coveted Pitré Prize in ...


Shivhei Habesht, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1996

Shivhei Habesht, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Shivhei HaBesht is the first collection of tales about the Besht. It contains biographical details about his parents, childhood, acquisition of mystical knowledge, travels, teachings, miracles, and death. Interspersed among these are stories about a few other hasidic leaders, followers of the Besht.


Meditation On A Russian Proverb In Israel, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

Meditation On A Russian Proverb In Israel, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

My father spoke in proverbs, but for many years I did not notice. Only after I completed my graduate studies in folklore and began teaching, did I become aware of the idioms in his conversation. Without being a religious person he interlaced his anecdotes and narratives with proverbs, biblical verses, and parables from the talmuds. I began to pay attention. A few years later, when I visited my parents in Israel, my father, who was a construction worker, told me that in retirement he tried to make a business deal but failed. Yet in spite of his naiveté in such ...


The Hebrew Folktale: A Review Essay. Review Of Eli Yassif, The Hebrew Folktale: History, Genre, Meaning, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

The Hebrew Folktale: A Review Essay. Review Of Eli Yassif, The Hebrew Folktale: History, Genre, Meaning, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The history of oral narratives is in the grip of a paradox. The voice of their past telling is no longer evident, and what is evident is no longer oral. Once committed to writing, oral tales become literature, bearing the consequences of this transformation that occurs under specific social, religious, economic, even technical, circumstances.1 The shift from orality to literacy involves thematic, stylistic, and poetic modifications, and although in their new state the tales have a relatively higher degree of stability, they still can offer us glimpses into their performance history.


Folklore In The Ancient Near East, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1992

Folklore In The Ancient Near East, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

This article will examine how the concept of "folklore" has been applied to the literature of the ANE.

A. Terminology

B. Comparative Method

1. Comparison with Ancient Cultures

2. Comparison with Postbiblical Literatures

3. Comparison with Islamic Cultures in the Near East

4. Cross-cultural Comparison

5. Comparison of Forms

6. Morphological Studies

7. Poetic Comparison

C. Ethnographic Method

1. Themes and Figures

2. Genres

3. Transmission of Tradition

D. Folklore and the Biblical Text


Old Yiddish And Middle Yiddish Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1992

Old Yiddish And Middle Yiddish Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

History and Territorial Boundaries. The Yiddish language emerged around the tenth century among the Jewish communities in Lotharingia in the Rhine valley. From there it spread to Northern Italy, Northern France and Holland with newly established Ashkenazi colonies, and under the impact of the Crusades to Central Europe and then eastward, to Slavic countires.33 Old Yiddish (1250-1500), primarily a spoken language, functioned as the language of oral tales, songs, fables, and proverbs. From that period scattered glosses and phrases are extant, the earliest of them is a blessing inscribed in an illuminated prayer book of Worms dated from 1272 ...


Jewish Studies And Jewish Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1990

Jewish Studies And Jewish Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Occasionally in the annals of scholarship there are events that turn upon themselves, so that, instead of being forums for exchange of ideas about a defined topic, they themselves become a subject for analysis and self-rejection. Our present panel is such an occasion. This is the first time in the history of the World Congresses for Jewish Studies that the program committee has allocated the discipline of folklore a plenary session, treating it as the equal of history, literature, Jewish languages and other fields that make up the entire gamut of Jewish studies. And thereby hangs a question. Why the ...


Folktale, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1989

Folktale, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Refers to oral narrative in general or to a particular GENRE of oral tales. As a general term folktale succeeds but does not replace the term fairy tale, which continues to be in literary and popular use. Fairy tale, in English at least since 1749, is a translation of the French conte de fée, a term that Contesse d'Aulnoy (Marie-Cathérine le Jumel de Barneville de la Motte) used in the title of her book published in 1697. Folktale is a translation of the German Volksmärchen, which appeared first in Volksmärchen der Deutschen (1782-1786), by Johann Karl August Musäus. The ...


Review Of A.T. Hatto, Traditions Of Heroic And Epic Poetry, Volume One: The Traditions, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1984

Review Of A.T. Hatto, Traditions Of Heroic And Epic Poetry, Volume One: The Traditions, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

For aficionados of the epic, to be in London between the summer of 1964 and the winter of 1972 must have been very exhilarating. During that period the London Seminar on Epic convened 31 times to hear lectures on diverse epics from both nearby and remote cultures, delivered by specialists of these poetic narratives and their literary traditions. The 12 articles that constitute the present volume are partial result of the seminar work. They are devoted to the "heroic and/or epic traditions in general terms," while a second volume, planned for the future, will include "detailed investigation, quoting original ...


The Idea Of Folklore: An Essay, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1983

The Idea Of Folklore: An Essay, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The concept of folklore emerged in Europe midway in the nineteenth century. Originally it connoted tradition, ancient customs and surviving festivals, old ditties and dateless ballads, archaic myths, legends and fables, and timeless tales and proverbs. As these narratives rarely stood the tests of common sense and experience, folklore also implied irrationality: beliefs in ghosts and demons, fairies and goblins, sprites and spirits; it referred to credence in omens, amulets, and talismans. From the perspective of the urbane literati, who conceived the idea of folklore, these two attributes of traditionality and irrationality could pertain only to peasant or primitive societies ...


Review Of Joseph C. Miller, The African Past Speaks: Essays On Oral Tradition And History, Dan Ben-Amos May 1981

Review Of Joseph C. Miller, The African Past Speaks: Essays On Oral Tradition And History, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The African past certainly speaks, but in what language? Is it the language of testimonies and accounts, or is it the language of metaphors, of symbols, and of structures? And once identified, what and whose code will decipher the message and unveil the secrets oral tradition both reveals and conceals? Ten scholars—all historians, Vansina vintage—join in this volume to answer these and related questions, and to counter the critique anthropologists mounted against their mentor's historical method. The eleventh contributor is Vansina himself, who has the last word.


Nationalism And Nihilism: The Attitude Of Two Hebrew Authors Toward Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1981

Nationalism And Nihilism: The Attitude Of Two Hebrew Authors Toward Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Folklore and literature are linked concepts, but so far no one theory has satisfactorily explained the nature of their relationship. Attempts have been made to establish the connection between them in terms of history, evolution, communication, and social systems. According to the historical approach, folklore consists of elementary forms which increase in formal and semantic complexity until they become literary genres.1 The Chadwicks stated a generally accepted position when they wrote that "written literature was derived in some form from this 'unwritten literature'."2 At the basis of this historical development are the dynamic laws of literature by which ...


Review Of Mabel H. Ross And Barbara K. Walker, "On Another Day..." Tales Told Among The Nkundo Of Zaire, Dan Ben-Amos Aug 1980

Review Of Mabel H. Ross And Barbara K. Walker, "On Another Day..." Tales Told Among The Nkundo Of Zaire, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

From the end of 1972 until the middle of 1974, Mrs. Mabel H. Ross, a missionary, traveled in Central Zaire among the Nkundo people, recording their oral narratives. The present volume includes the English translation of these tales, supplemented by two texts translated from the Flemish and one from Lonkundo that appeared in A. de Rop, De gesproken woordkunst van de Nkundo (Tervuren: Museé Royale du Congo Belge, 1956) and in G. Hulstaert and A. de Rop (eds.), Rechtspraakfabels van de Nkundo (Tervuren: La Commission de Linguistique Africaine, 1954), and by eighteen texts translated from Lonkundo that were first published ...


Review Of Loreto Todd, Some Day Been Dey: West African Pidgin Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1980

Review Of Loreto Todd, Some Day Been Dey: West African Pidgin Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Neither the general bibliography on African oral literature by Harold Scheub, African Oral Narratives, Proverbs, Riddles, Poetry, and Song (Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1977), nor the more specific bibliography by Virginia and Mark Delancety, A Bibliography of Cameroon Folklore, an Occasional Publication of the Literature Committee of the African Studies Association (Waltham, Mass.: African Studies Association, 1972) list any collection of Pidgin narratives anywhere from Africa, let alone the Cameroon. Hence the significance of the present collection of tales. Yet its import extends beyond the sheer textual documentation of narrative in a language, the use of which, it has ...


Review Of Isidore Okpewho, The Epic In Africa: Toward A Poetics Of The Oral Performance, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1980

Review Of Isidore Okpewho, The Epic In Africa: Toward A Poetics Of The Oral Performance, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

When Ruth Finnegan published her book Oral Literature in Africa (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1970), out of five hundred and fifty-eight pages she devoted only two and half pages to the epic, and even these were negative. "All in all," she wrote, "epic poetry does not seem to be a typical African form. . . .Certain elements of epic also come into many other forms of poetry and prose. But in general terms and apart from Islamic influences, epic seems to be of remarkably little significance in African oral literature, and the a priori assumption that epic is the natural form for ...


The Modern Local Historian In Africa, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1978

The Modern Local Historian In Africa, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The introduction of literacy into African societies has added writing and printing as dimensions to the communication of historical knowledge. A by-product of this development is the availability of new information sources for historical-folkloristic research, namely, the works of local historians. In most cases these appear in thin pamphlets, published by local printers, and circulate among a local educated public; occasionally, their reading audience extends beyond the boundaries of the original indigenous community and reaches university historians, who treat these publications as if they were primary sources for historical reconstruction. They are thought to reflect the common view of the ...


The History Of Folklore And The History Of Science, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1977

The History Of Folklore And The History Of Science, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

We have to recognize a very important methodological problem that is involved in the study of the history of folklore. By turning to the history of the discipline as a subject of research we embark into a different discipline, namely history of science, and thus assume new responsibilities. As a matter of fact, at present the history of science is a recognized discipline with its departments, books and textbooks, journals and national and international conventions that provide the framework for scholarly exchange. At the University of Pennsylvania we have a department, History and Sociology of Science, devoted precisely to this ...


The Concept Of Genre In Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1977

The Concept Of Genre In Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

If the concept of genre appears inadequate and the definitions of forms are vague, if the arguments about classifications are tiring and the debates about standards seem futile, the fault is not only in the genres, but also in ourselves. The terms for genres are an integral part of any language. They are the words for speaking about speech and for conceiving of categories of tradition. Myth, tale, legend, and song, and their correlates in other languages, existed long before the idea of folklore dawned upon scholars. When folklore became a discipline, and its research assumed scientific garb, we took ...


Review Of Haim Schwarzbaum, Studies In Jewish And World Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1972

Review Of Haim Schwarzbaum, Studies In Jewish And World Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

This is a book of comparative notes and studies for the texts which are published in a volume of Yiddish oral-narratives edited by Naftoli Gross, Maaselech un Mesholim: Tales and Parables (New York, 1955). Gross, a Yiddish poet and writer had had a lifelong interest in folktales. As he writes in the preface to his book, he himself comes from a traditional home in which both parents, a grandfather, and many neighbors frequently told stories. The end of the Sabbath day was the favorite storytelling time. He learned other traditional tales and anecdotes from his peers and mates in the ...


Review Of Phillip D. Curtin, Africa Remembered: Narratives By West Africans From The Era Of Slave Trade, Dan Ben-Amos Jul 1970

Review Of Phillip D. Curtin, Africa Remembered: Narratives By West Africans From The Era Of Slave Trade, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

It has long been evident that folklore research in literate societies cannot rely exclusively on oral tradition but must incorporate data found in written sources as well. Now, indirectly, Phillip Curtin illustrates the applicability of the same methodological principle to folklorisitc investigation in traditionally nonliterate societies.


Review Of Victor Turner, The Forest Of Symbols: Aspects Of Ndembu Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos Apr 1970

Review Of Victor Turner, The Forest Of Symbols: Aspects Of Ndembu Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The ten essays that comprise this volume deal with the ritual symbols of the Ndembu people of Zambia, south-central Africa. All except one were previously published within the last ten years. Most of them excel in analytical rigor, detailed ethnographic description, and provide stimulating theoretical suggestions. Now that these essays have been assembled in a single volume, Victor Turner's approach emerges as a fruitful research method. It could well be one of the most significant contributions any anthropologist has made to folklore studies in the past decade.