Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

The Communion Of Women: Missions And Gender In Colonial Africa And The British Metropole, Heather J. Sharkey Jun 2011

The Communion Of Women: Missions And Gender In Colonial Africa And The British Metropole, Heather J. Sharkey

Departmental Papers (NELC)

No abstract provided.


The Challenge Of Political Islam: Non-Muslims And The Egyptian State, Heather J. Sharkey May 2011

The Challenge Of Political Islam: Non-Muslims And The Egyptian State, Heather J. Sharkey

Departmental Papers (NELC)

No abstract provided.


Review Of Sarah Sorour Soroudi, The Folktales Of The Jews From Iran, Central Asia, And Afghanistan: Tale-Types And Genres, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2011

Review Of Sarah Sorour Soroudi, The Folktales Of The Jews From Iran, Central Asia, And Afghanistan: Tale-Types And Genres, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Sarah Sorour Soroudi (1938-2002) was born in Tehran, Iran and immigrated to Israel in 1959, where she resumed at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem her academic studies that she had begun at the University of Tehran. She received her doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1972 and returned to Israel, joining faculty of the department of Indian, Iranian and Armenian studies of the Hebrew University. Persian literature and poetry was her primary scholarly concern, but over the years her interest in Persian culture and folklore evolved with a particular focus on the folklore of Iranian Jews. The ...


Institutions, The Rise Of Commerce And The Persistence Of Laws: Interest Restrictions In Islam And Christianity, Jared Rubin Jan 2011

Institutions, The Rise Of Commerce And The Persistence Of Laws: Interest Restrictions In Islam And Christianity, Jared Rubin

Economics Faculty Articles and Research

Why was economic development retarded in the Middle East relative to Western Europe, despite the Middle East being far ahead for centuries? A theoretical model inspired and substantiated by the history of interest restrictions suggests that this outcome emanates in part from the greater degree to which early Islamic political authorities derived legitimacy from religious authorities. This entailed a feedback mechanism in Europe in which the rise of commerce led to the relaxation of interest restrictions while also diminishing the Church's ability to legitimise political authorities. These interactions did not occur in the Islamic world despite equally amenable economic ...