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Full-Text Articles in Near and Middle Eastern Studies

Forgive, Forget Or Feign: Everyday Diplomacy In Local Communities Of Polish Subcarpathia, Iuliia Buyskykh Jun 2018

Forgive, Forget Or Feign: Everyday Diplomacy In Local Communities Of Polish Subcarpathia, Iuliia Buyskykh

Journal of Global Catholicism

The paper is based on my ethnographic fieldwork in Przemyśl, Poland and several surrounding villages in 2015-2017. While conducting my research on a set of religious practices and pilgrimages in confessionally and ethnically mixed localities, I faced many challenges that changed the main course of my initial research plan. During my interaction with people here themes came to light that seemed little related to religiousness. My status as a researcher from Ukraine and even more so, my being a young single woman from Ukraine, gave rise to a number of other topics that my interlocutors, both of Polish and Ukrainian ...


Contested Moral Issues In Contemporary African Catholicism: Theological Proposals For A Hermeneutics Of Multiplicity And Inclusion, Stan Chu Ilo Jul 2017

Contested Moral Issues In Contemporary African Catholicism: Theological Proposals For A Hermeneutics Of Multiplicity And Inclusion, Stan Chu Ilo

Journal of Global Catholicism

Drawing upon the broad work of Vatican II and Pope Francis’ Evangelicum Gaudium the article proposes how a hermeneutic of multiplicity and inclusion could help hold in balance the tension between tradition and innovation, universal principles and specific contextual application for Catholicism in Africa. Among the issues addressed are cultural relativism, natural law theory, and polygamy.


The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas Sep 2016

The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas

Journal of Global Catholicism

This article presents a feminist analysis of patriarchy persisting in Catholicism of the Syro-Malabar rite in Kerala. The article specifically considers the impact of charismatic Catholicism on women of the Syro-Malabar rite and argues that it is important to interrogate this new face of religiosity in order to fully understand how certain rituals are allowed to change and be fluid, while others, especially concerning female sexuality, are enshrined as “tradition” which often restricts the parameters for women’s empowerment and may reinforce caste and patriarchal hegemonies preventing feminist solidarity across different religious- and caste-based groups.


The Future Of Arabic Music: No Sound Without Silence, Nesma Magdy Khodier Vcuq Jan 2016

The Future Of Arabic Music: No Sound Without Silence, Nesma Magdy Khodier Vcuq

Theses and Dissertations

For centuries, Arabic music has been intrinsically linked to Arab culture and by extension bonded to the environmental landscape of the region, reflecting their emotions, moods, and behaviors. Numerous technological advancements in the latter half of the twentieth century, have greatly affected the rich legacy of Arabic music, significantly impacting the natural progression of traditional Arabic musical genres, scales, and instrumentation.

This thesis serves as an introduction to generative methods of music production, specifically music generated through gestures. Through generative music, and its unique ability to map gestures to different musical parameters, music can be produced using computer algorithms.

The ...


Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2015

Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Four interrelated qualities distinguish Jewish folklore: (a) extended history depth, (b) continuous interdependence between orality and literacy, (c) national dispersion of the nation, and (d) linguistic diversity. The Hebrew Bible, the earliest Jewish written text, contains evidence of older oral tradition. Once canonized, its ritual reading spawned new oral exetical and metaphorical oral narratives and its retelling retrieved traditions that literacy excluded. The written records of Jewish traditions of Late Antiquity also include folklore of that era. With the rise of the Diaspora Jewish communities had their own regional folklore that synthesized local with Jewish traditions and was performed in ...


The Art Of Lebanese Verbal Dueling: The Battle Of Beit Mery And Beyond, Paula Marie Haydar Aug 2014

The Art Of Lebanese Verbal Dueling: The Battle Of Beit Mery And Beyond, Paula Marie Haydar

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation examines the living and vibrant oral tradition of verbal dueling in Lebanon, also known as Lebanese zajal. The introductory chapter explores the historical, sociolinguistic, and musical-metrical roots of today's Lebanese zajal contests and festivals, which feature teams of up to four poets who compete against each other in improvised, sung verse in colloquial Lebanese, carrying a sort of dialogue within which they argue opposing sides of universal themes and topics of current social interest. Though time, tradition, and culture in the Lebanese mountainside have nurtured the development of sung oral poetry into its current form and status ...


Obituary: Dov Noy (1920-2013), Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2014

Obituary: Dov Noy (1920-2013), Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Dov Noy was my teacher, but not mine alone. He introduced folklore into Jewish Studies, and Jewish folklore into the discipline of folklore. Stith Thompson (1885-1976) integrated Dov Noy's dissertation (as Dov Neuman) "Motif-Index of Talmudic-Midrashic Literature" (1954) into the second edition of the Motif-Index of Folk-Literature and established its subject, and Dov Noy himself, firmly in the international community of folklore scholars. Upon the completion of his studies at Indiana University, Noy joined the faculty of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1955 and began offering courses in folklore in the Hebrew Literature and the Yiddish departments. He ...


A Definition Of Folklore: A Personal Narrative, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2014

A Definition Of Folklore: A Personal Narrative, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

My definition of folklore as "artistic communication in small groups" was forged in the context of folklore studies of the 1960s, in the discontent with the definitions that were current at the time, and under the influence of anthropology, linguistics - particularly 'the ethnography of speaking' - and Russian formalism. My field research among the Edo people of Nigeria had a formative impact upon my conception of folklore, when I observed their storytellers, singers, dancers and diviners in performance. The response to the definition was initially negative, or at best ambivalent, but as time passed, it took a more positive turn.


Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2014

Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

A literacy divide runs deep in Jewish society. The scribes, the priests, and the prophets who wrote the Bible referred to the folk on the other side of the divide as ha-'am (the people), and the sages, who taught the books that followed, called them 'olam (the world population). Both terms resonate in subsequent Jewish languages. The Yiddish word 'amkha (all the people), and its analogue in Judeo-Spanish, povlacho, have their roots in the Bible where the concept of the "people" is ubiquitous. It occurs in a variety of forms as kol ha-'am (all the people), 'am ha- ...


Review Of Rella Kushelevsky, Penalty And Temptation: Hebrew Tales In Ashkenaz, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2012

Review Of Rella Kushelevsky, Penalty And Temptation: Hebrew Tales In Ashkenaz, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Most Fabula readers do not have an easy access to Hebrew books, and therefore it would be highly advisable to have the present volume available in a more accessible language to folklore scholars around the world. The issues that Rella Kushelevsky addresses, the texts that she interprets, and the analytical method that she employs are all relevant to current folklore scholarship, and therefore they can generate constructive debates, new research directions, and formulate new questions regarding medieval folklore.


Review Of Sarah Sorour Soroudi, The Folktales Of The Jews From Iran, Central Asia, And Afghanistan: Tale-Types And Genres, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2011

Review Of Sarah Sorour Soroudi, The Folktales Of The Jews From Iran, Central Asia, And Afghanistan: Tale-Types And Genres, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Sarah Sorour Soroudi (1938-2002) was born in Tehran, Iran and immigrated to Israel in 1959, where she resumed at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem her academic studies that she had begun at the University of Tehran. She received her doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1972 and returned to Israel, joining faculty of the department of Indian, Iranian and Armenian studies of the Hebrew University. Persian literature and poetry was her primary scholarly concern, but over the years her interest in Persian culture and folklore evolved with a particular focus on the folklore of Iranian Jews. The ...


Straparola: The Revolution That Was Not, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2010

Straparola: The Revolution That Was Not, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Inspired by Ruth Bottigheimer's 2002 book, Fairy Godfather: Straparola, Venice, and the Fairy Tale Tradition, this article examines her proposition that the sixteenth-century Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola invented the "rise tale," in which a lowly hero or heroine climbs the socioeconomic ladder with the help of a magical benefactor. It investigates Bottigheimer's evidence for this claim as well as her argument that Straparola's literary invention was a projection of the emerging Italian middles class in the sixteenth century. Contrary to Bottigheimer's proposition, it is found that tales with similar form were told in classical Greece ...


Introduction: The European Fairy-Tale Tradition Between Orality And Literacy, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2010

Introduction: The European Fairy-Tale Tradition Between Orality And Literacy, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In Fairy Godfather: Straparola, Venice, and the Fairy Tale Tradition Ruth Bottingheimer proposes to correct the historical narrative of the emergence of the fairy tale in Europe and to recognize "Straparola's role as an originator in the history of modern fairy tale" (Bottingheimer 2002:3). Giovanni Francesco Straparola (c. 1480-c. 1557) is not exactly an unknown figure in folktale history.1 His book, Le piacevoli notti (Pleasant nights), which appeared in English as The Nights of Straparola (Straparola [1551-1553] 1894), was long recognized as a predecessor of Giambattista Basile's Lo cunto de li cunti (The tale of tales ...


Elijah The Prophet, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2008

Elijah The Prophet, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

or Eliyohu hanovi, was the most popular biblical figure in Jewish folklore in Eastern Europe. The oral traditions of late antiquity established the narrative foundation upon which his image would develop; his name also occurs in proverbs and songs. Elijah is said to make an invisible appearance during the Passover Seder, when a special cup of wine is poured in his honor, and at circumcision ceremonies, when a special chair is reserved for him.


Stabilität, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2007

Stabilität, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Die Frage, inwieweit → Texte der Volksüberlieferung stabil oder variabel sind (→ Variabilität), zählt zu den schwierigsten theoretischen Problemen der Erzählforschung. Angesichts der vielfältigen Übermittlungsakte über Sprach-, Kultur- und Ländergrenzen sowie hist. Epochen hinweg sowie angesichts der → Kreativität der → Erzähler und Erzählerinen, von dene jede(r) einzelne die Instabilität von Erzählungen erhöht, ist die relative S. des Erzählguts ein erstaunliches Phänomen. Unter den Hypothesen, die zu ihrer Erklärung vorgebracht wurden, können vier theoretische Ansätze unterschieden werden: (1) ein nihilistischer, (2) ein gesellschaftlicher, (3_ ein psychol. und (4) ein literar. Diese Hypothesen stehen nicht notwendigerweise in Widerspruch zueinander; oft bemühen sie sich, die ...


On Demons, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2005

On Demons, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The year was 1966. The sixties were at their height, though we did not know it then. It was two years after the Beatles had landed in New York, and a year before the Six Day War. The Democratic convention in Chicago was still two years away. A group of us, all Israelis, came to UCLA, each for his own reasons. Ruth Kartun-Blum and her husband Amos were there, and so were Ella and Dan Almagor. Professor Joseph Dan, Yossi to his friends, who was the most academically senior among us, came to teach in the Near Eastern Languages and ...


Die Zeischen Als Metasprache In Der Jüdischen Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos, Dov Noy Jan 2004

Die Zeischen Als Metasprache In Der Jüdischen Folklore, Dan Ben-Amos, Dov Noy

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Die Gematrie ist ein System zur Ver- und Entschlüsselung von Begriffen und Sinneinheiten, das auf Entsprechungen von Zahlen und Buchstaben gründet. Täuschend simpel, erhält sie ihre Komplexität durch die vielfätigen Berechnungen der Zahlenwerte, etwa indem man Zahlen mit sich selbst multipliziert oder die Buchstaben der Namen von Buchstaben miteinander kombiniert.1 Neben den verschiedenen Berechnungsmethoden tragen jedoch 2 Grundeigenschaften zu ihrer Vielschichtigkeit bei: Zum einen entfaltet die Gematre eine Eigene Interpretationsmacht, zum anderen kann sie durch die wechselseitige Übersetzbarkeit von Buchstaben und Zahlen bestehende Bedeutungen verändern. Der Prozess der Interpretation selbst wandelt auch die Funktion von Buchstaben, indem er sie ...


Review Of Galit Hasan-Rokem (Guest Editor), Folk Culture And Popular Culture. Theory And Criticism: An Israeli Forum, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2000

Review Of Galit Hasan-Rokem (Guest Editor), Folk Culture And Popular Culture. Theory And Criticism: An Israeli Forum, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

At a time when folklorists flounder in America, they flourish in Israel. Being under the perennial threat of department closures, American folklorists have ventured into the fields of public folklore that politicians have mined. In contrast, in Israel, while making slow and modest progress at the universities, folklorists have joined forces with non-academic intellectuals and scholars in other disciplines to present before the public their latest research analyses and their explorations of new directions. Theory and Criticism ("Teoria unikoret") is one of Israel's leading forums for ideas and scholarship. It is an interdisciplinary journal that appeals to a growing ...


Review Of Hayyim Pesah And Eli Yassif, The Knight, The Demon And The Virgin: An Anthology Of Hebrew Stories From The Middle Ages, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2000

Review Of Hayyim Pesah And Eli Yassif, The Knight, The Demon And The Virgin: An Anthology Of Hebrew Stories From The Middle Ages, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In the currently charged world of Israeli public opinion, the publication of this book is a political act. The editors have crammed well known medieval Hebrew texts into a cheap, paperback format, using paper the acidity of which is more fitting for traditional "folk books" than for typical scholarly tomes designed for the library shelf. In this book readers will encounter the classics of Jewish folk literature--such as "The Story of the Jerusalemite," "Joseph Della Reina," and principle texts from Hebrew medieval romance literature such as "The Alexander Romance," a selection of "Tales of Sendebar," and a "Hebrew Arthurian Romance ...


The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2000

The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In 1970, when Ruth Finnegan published her ground-breaking book Oral Literature in Africa, she devoted extensive chapters to prose narratives, proverbs, riddles, and praise poetry. She did not neglect forms in African folklore that at the time were barely studied, such as children's songs and rhymes, But to the epic she allocated in her massive book of over 550 pages only two-and-a-half pages that she set aside at the conclusion of her chapter on "Poetry and Patronage" under the title "A Note on 'Epic'" (Finnegan 1970: 108-10). Probably having in mind the works of the Chadwicks and Bowra, she ...


Jewish Folk Literature, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1999

Jewish Folk Literature, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Four interrelated qualities distinguish Jewish folk literature: (a) historical depth, (b) continuous interdependence between orality and literacy, (c) national dispersion, and (d) linguistic diversity. In spite of these diverging factors, the folklore of most Jewish communities clearly shares a number of features. The Jews, as a people, maintain a collective memory that extends well into the second millennium BCE. Although literacy undoubtedly figured in the preservation of the Jewish cultural heritage to a great extent, at each period it was complemented by orality. The reciprocal relations between the two thus enlarged the thematic, formal, and social bases of Jewish folklore ...


The Name Is The Thing, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1998

The Name Is The Thing, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

During the 1996 annual meeting of the American Folklore Society (AFS), several folklorists called for the replacement of the term folklore with one that would better represent current activities in the filed and that would be free of any negative connotations. A new term would enable folklorists to center themselves in both scholarship and public affairs. In defense of folklore, the present article begins by comparing the addresses given at the celebration of the term's centennial and those delivered at its 150th anniversary. In the United States, where folklore has suffered the greatest damage, there is a correlation between ...


"A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration: A Review Article", Review Of Linda Dégh, Narratives In Society: A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1998

"A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration: A Review Article", Review Of Linda Dégh, Narratives In Society: A Performer-Centered Study Of Narration, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

An Hungarian in America, Linda Dégh lives the ideal of a Malinowskian fieldworker. After immigrating to the United States and joining the faculty of the famous Folklore Institute at Indiana University in the 60s, she has become a participant in and an observer of American life, conducting research among native Midwesterners and Hungarian immigrants in towns like Bloomington, Evansville, Indiana, as well as the highly industrial Calumet Region, particularly in Gary, Indiana. Dégh arrived in the United States as a mature and accomplished scholar, after conducting extensive field research in her native Hungary, and winning the coveted Pitré Prize in ...


Review Of Gyula Paczolay, European Proverbs In 55 Languages With Equivalents In Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese And Japanes/Európai Közmondások 55 Nyelven Arab, Perzsa, Szanszkrit, Kínai És Japán Megfelelökkel, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1997

Review Of Gyula Paczolay, European Proverbs In 55 Languages With Equivalents In Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese And Japanes/Európai Közmondások 55 Nyelven Arab, Perzsa, Szanszkrit, Kínai És Japán Megfelelökkel, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

"Timing is everything." A more appropriate modern proverb could not have better described the publication of the present volume Its research extends into proverb scholarship in fifty-five European and six non-European languages, its production requires no less than nine different fonts. No doubt, both stages of preparation have lasted a long time. The publisher gives just an inkling of the length of this labor of love by informing the readers that the manuscript "was closed in January 1990," and was slightly updated in 1994-95 before printing commenced. Like Jacob who anguished for seven years before he could marry his lovely ...


Obituary: Raphael Patai (1910-1996), Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1997

Obituary: Raphael Patai (1910-1996), Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

First memories are formative. Raphael Patai, who died on July 20, 1996, opens his autobiography with a memory of himself as an infant sliding down three flights of stairs into the street and placing himself between the two rails of the tramline, only to be saved at the last minute and carried back into the safety of his home by his mother. Whether recalled or reinforced by parental retelling, both aspects of this recollection, the spirit of independent exploration and the protective warmth of home, mark his path in life.


Obituary: Kenneth S. Goldstein (1927-1995), Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1996

Obituary: Kenneth S. Goldstein (1927-1995), Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

A midrashic proverb observes that "when a man departs this world, he does not have as much as half of his desire in his hand." When Kenny Goldstein died on November 11, 1995, at the age of 68, he left behind manuscripts he did not complete, songs he did not transcribe, and singers he did not record. But the books and articles that he did not write himself he did write through his students and friends: hundreds of them. Always the consummate teacher, he was a rabbi of folklore. The situations he enjoyed most were the long seminar discussions when ...


Review Of Joseph Mali, The Rehabilitation Of Myth: Vico's New Science, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

Review Of Joseph Mali, The Rehabilitation Of Myth: Vico's New Science, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Joseph Mali, a historian of ideas, might not have heard of folklore as an academic discipline. He does not index the term, nor does he indicate in any other way his awareness of the existence of folklore as scholarship. In this entire volume, he mentions "folklore" only three or four times: twice in connection with the traditions of nonliterate societies (pp. 102, 139), and once (p. 197) in reference to Milman Parry's—but not Albert Lord's—formulaic theory. A fourth time can be considered when he compares Vico's term sensus communis and Herder's volkgeist, establishing an ...


Meditation On A Russian Proverb In Israel, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

Meditation On A Russian Proverb In Israel, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

My father spoke in proverbs, but for many years I did not notice. Only after I completed my graduate studies in folklore and began teaching, did I become aware of the idioms in his conversation. Without being a religious person he interlaced his anecdotes and narratives with proverbs, biblical verses, and parables from the talmuds. I began to pay attention. A few years later, when I visited my parents in Israel, my father, who was a construction worker, told me that in retirement he tried to make a business deal but failed. Yet in spite of his naiveté in such ...


The Hebrew Folktale: A Review Essay. Review Of Eli Yassif, The Hebrew Folktale: History, Genre, Meaning, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

The Hebrew Folktale: A Review Essay. Review Of Eli Yassif, The Hebrew Folktale: History, Genre, Meaning, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The history of oral narratives is in the grip of a paradox. The voice of their past telling is no longer evident, and what is evident is no longer oral. Once committed to writing, oral tales become literature, bearing the consequences of this transformation that occurs under specific social, religious, economic, even technical, circumstances.1 The shift from orality to literacy involves thematic, stylistic, and poetic modifications, and although in their new state the tales have a relatively higher degree of stability, they still can offer us glimpses into their performance history.


"Induced Natural Context" In Context, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1995

"Induced Natural Context" In Context, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Folklore students of several generations have grown up on Kenneth Goldstein's A Guide for Field Workers in Folklore (1964). When they prepared to go in the field, they used his Guide, and they consulted it again when they arrived there. His cogent advice followed them, tucked conveniently in their pocket or pocketbook, reassuring them in doubt and offering solutions in uncertain situations. In the loneliness of the field, the Guide became a companion to which researchers turned in crisis and in joy. Make "safety copies of all recordings and notes" (p. 143), Goldstein's sound advice followed them wherever ...