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2. Human-wildlife conflict

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Full-Text Articles in Nature and Society Relations

An Assessment Of South China Tiger Reintroduction Potential In Hupingshan And Houhe National Nature Reserves, China, Yiyuan Qin, Philip J. Nyhus, Courtney L. Larson, Charles J.W. Carroll, Jeff Muntifering, Thomas D. Dahmer, Lu Jun, Ronald L. Tilson Dec 2014

An Assessment Of South China Tiger Reintroduction Potential In Hupingshan And Houhe National Nature Reserves, China, Yiyuan Qin, Philip J. Nyhus, Courtney L. Larson, Charles J.W. Carroll, Jeff Muntifering, Thomas D. Dahmer, Lu Jun, Ronald L. Tilson

Philip J. Nyhus

Human-caused biodiversity loss is a global problem, large carnivores are particularly threatened, and the tiger (Panthera tigris) is among the world’s most endangered large carnivores. The South China tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis) is the most critically endangered tiger subspecies and is considered functionally extinct in the wild. The government of China has expressed its intent to reintroduce a small population of South China tigers into a portion of their historic range as part of a larger goal to recover wild tiger populations in China. This would be the world’s first major tiger reintroduction program. A free-ranging population of ...


The Conservation Value Of Tigers: Separating Science From Fiction, Philip J. Nyhus, Ron L. Tilson Jul 2009

The Conservation Value Of Tigers: Separating Science From Fiction, Philip J. Nyhus, Ron L. Tilson

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Conservation Value Of Tigers: Separating Science From Fiction, Philip J. Nyhus, Ron L. Tilson Dec 2008

The Conservation Value Of Tigers: Separating Science From Fiction, Philip J. Nyhus, Ron L. Tilson

Philip J. Nyhus

No abstract provided.


Tiger Restoration In Asia: Ecological Theory Vs. Sociological Reality, Ronald Tilson, Philip J. Nyhus, Neil Franklin Jan 2001

Tiger Restoration In Asia: Ecological Theory Vs. Sociological Reality, Ronald Tilson, Philip J. Nyhus, Neil Franklin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Tiger Restoration In Asia: Ecological Theory Vs. Sociological Reality, Ronald Tilson, Philip J. Nyhus, Neil Franklin Dec 2000

Tiger Restoration In Asia: Ecological Theory Vs. Sociological Reality, Ronald Tilson, Philip J. Nyhus, Neil Franklin

Philip J. Nyhus

No abstract provided.


Crop-Raiding Elephants And Conservation Implications At Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia, Philip J. Nyhus, Sumianto, Ronald Tilson Jan 2000

Crop-Raiding Elephants And Conservation Implications At Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia, Philip J. Nyhus, Sumianto, Ronald Tilson

Faculty Scholarship

Crop raiding by wild elephants is one of the most significant sources of park–people conflict in Sumatra, Indonesia. The distribution, impact and conservation implications of elephant crop-raiding in 13 villages that border Way Kambas National Park in southern Sumatra were studied for 18 months. The data are based on rapid village and field assessments, data logs maintained by village observers and a quantitative household survey. Elephants raided crops year-round at a mean rate of 0.53 elephants per day for the entire study area. The frequency of crop raiding was related to vegetation type along the park border, the ...


Crop-Raiding Elephants And Conservation Implications At Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia, Philip J. Nyhus, Sumianto, Ronald Tilson Dec 1999

Crop-Raiding Elephants And Conservation Implications At Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia, Philip J. Nyhus, Sumianto, Ronald Tilson

Philip J. Nyhus

Crop raiding by wild elephants is one of the most significant sources of park–people conflict in Sumatra, Indonesia. The distribution, impact and conservation implications of elephant crop-raiding in 13 villages that border Way Kambas National Park in southern Sumatra were studied for 18 months. The data are based on rapid village and field assessments, data logs maintained by village observers and a quantitative household survey. Elephants raided crops year-round at a mean rate of 0.53 elephants per day for the entire study area. The frequency of crop raiding was related to vegetation type along the park border, the ...