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Full-Text Articles in Nature and Society Relations

Sloterdijk’S Cynicism: Diogenes In The Marketplace, Babette Babich Nov 2012

Sloterdijk’S Cynicism: Diogenes In The Marketplace, Babette Babich

Babette Babich

No abstract provided.


Is Dismissing The Precautionary Principle The Manly Thing To Do? Gender And The Economics Of Climate Change, Julie Nelson Sep 2012

Is Dismissing The Precautionary Principle The Manly Thing To Do? Gender And The Economics Of Climate Change, Julie Nelson

Julie A. Nelson

Many public debates about climate change now focus on the economic "costs" of taking action. When called on to advise about these, many leading mainstream economists downplay the need for care and caution on climate issues, forecasting a future with infinitely continued economic growth. This essay highlights the roles of binary metaphors and cultural archetypes in creating the highly gendered, sexist, and age-ist attitudes that underlie this dominant advice. Gung-ho economic growth advocates aspire to the role of The Hero, rejecting the conservatism of The Old Wife. But in a world that is not actually as safe and predictable as ...


Productivity Gains And The Limits Of Tropical Ranching In Colombia, 1850-1950, Shawn Van Ausdal Jan 2012

Productivity Gains And The Limits Of Tropical Ranching In Colombia, 1850-1950, Shawn Van Ausdal

Shawn Van Ausdal

Contrary to the common assumption that Colombian ranchers were uninterested or unable to improve their cattle operations before the 1950s, this article provides evidence of slowly rising productivity indices from the mid-nineteenth century. These improvements were based on the diffusion of African grasses, new breeds of cattle, barbed-wire fencing, and better ranch management. However, despite such gains, Colombian ranchers failed to break into the international beef trade; their productivity levels did not rise sufficiently to compete against major exporters such as Argentina. Nonetheless, the gains they made suggest that this failure was not simply rooted in the backward and non-productive ...