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The Wild And The Tame, Juliet Clutton-Brock Jan 1995

The Wild And The Tame, Juliet Clutton-Brock

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

The Western belief that the world is divided into the "human" and the "natural" stems from the philosophy, first propounded by the ancient Greeks, notably Aristotle, that all living organisms could be placed in a Scale of Nature or Great Chain of Being with "primeval slime" at its base and "Man" at its summit. This belief, which is imbued in Christianity and in all aspects of western civilization, has led to a great divide with "the wild" on one side and "the tame", that is all the animals and plants that are exploited by human, on the other.


Wild / Captive And Other Suspect Dualisms, Dale Jamieson Jan 1995

Wild / Captive And Other Suspect Dualisms, Dale Jamieson

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

Dualisms have had a hard time in recent years. Philosophers used to think that facts and values were distinct, and that philosophy and science were radically different enterprises. While scientists employed empirical methods to discover the way the world happens to be, the job of philosophers was to use conceptual analysis to reveal how the world necessarily is. In the wake of the revolution unleashed by Quine in the early 1950s, philosophers either had to learn some science, find another job, or fight an irredentist action on behalf of conceptual analysis that is mainly of interest only to a few ...


Preserving Individuals Versus Conserving Populations: Is There A Conflict?, Donald G. Lindburg Jan 1995

Preserving Individuals Versus Conserving Populations: Is There A Conflict?, Donald G. Lindburg

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

Summarized briefly, animal liberation/animal rights' valuation of the individual about its zoological taxon or associates in a community is an extension of ethical theory to animals, using the criterion of sentience rather than rationality for ascribing to the individual the right to an existence free of human-imposed pain and suffering. Humans are not entitled to inflict pain of any purpose, according to this view, including the utilization of animals for food or clothing, for scientific and medical experimentation, for recreation, or even for the animals' own survival as a zoological entity. Insofar as the have written on the subject ...


Animal Well-Being In Zoos, Conservation Centers And In-Situ Conservation Programs, John Lukas Jan 1995

Animal Well-Being In Zoos, Conservation Centers And In-Situ Conservation Programs, John Lukas

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

Well-being, as defined in reference to one's welfare, is the condition of happiness, prosperity and good health. In dealing with an animal's well-being, there are two frames of reference to consider. First, biological well-being which encompasses the spacial, social, nutritional, behavioral and reproductive needs of a species. Secondly, cultural well-being of animals concentrating on their perception of happiness, cleanliness, safety and the way the animals are treated by the people who care for them.

In this paper, we are not addressing freedom as a condition of well-being, only happiness, prosperity and good health. Free-ranging wild animals are not ...


Animal Well-Being In The Wild And In Captivity, Stephen Bostock Jan 1995

Animal Well-Being In The Wild And In Captivity, Stephen Bostock

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

I want to compare wild and captivity. This isn't a straight comparison of good with bad. Animals do suffer in the wild, and they are protected in good captivity. I will fill out the details of this in the following sections, before discussing how captivity can be more benign, whether or not it can ever strictly be regarded as better than life in the wild.


What Do "Wild" And "Captive" Mean For Large Ungulates And Carnivores Now And Into The Twenty-First Century, Michael Hutchins Jan 1995

What Do "Wild" And "Captive" Mean For Large Ungulates And Carnivores Now And Into The Twenty-First Century, Michael Hutchins

Zoo and Aquarium Animal Populations

The terms "wild" and "captive" have stimulated considerable debate among academicians, animal protectionists and conservationists. Some argue that animals have a right to freedom and that there is a "moral predis-position" against holding them in zoos (Jamieson, 1985; 1995; Varner and Monroe, 1991). Others argue that modern zoos and their living collections are becoming increasing important to wildlife conservation and science, and that the collective benefits so derived may override this predisposition (Hutchins and Wemmer, 1991; Conway, 1995; Hutchins et al, 1995; Norton, 1995). The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of "wild" and "captive" and their ...


A Natural Area Inventory Of Ames, Iowa , William Russell Norris Jan 1995

A Natural Area Inventory Of Ames, Iowa , William Russell Norris

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Perhaps no state in the Union has suffered such widespread degradation of its natural vegetation as Iowa. Tallgrass prairie (including wet prairie communities, often considered to be wetlands) once covered at least 85% of this state's land area, but more than 99.9% of Iowa's original grasslands have fallen victim to the plow (Smith 1990). Wetlands once covered 11.1% of Iowa's landscape (Dahl 1990), but virtually all of these have been drained to make way for rowcrops (wetlands now cover only 1.2% of Iowa's landscape). Roughly 12 to 20% of the state was covered ...


Samuel, Patrick And Cato: A History Of The Dallas Fire Of 1860 And Its Tragic Aftermath, Rebecca Howdeshell, William R. Farmer (1921-2000) Jan 1995

Samuel, Patrick And Cato: A History Of The Dallas Fire Of 1860 And Its Tragic Aftermath, Rebecca Howdeshell, William R. Farmer (1921-2000)

Perkins Faculty Research and Special Events

In this unpublished work, William R. Farmer (1921-2000), former associate professor of New Testament at Perkins School of Theology, recounts the story of the Dallas Fire of 1860 and the events that followed: the hanging of three innocent African American men and the whipping of many local slaves. Farmer’s work explores the causes of these acts of racial terrorism by presenting and discussing numerous primary resources. Accompanying the book manuscript is a related work: “A Reader for the Study of the Dallas Fire of 1860.” Both documents were created in the late 1990s.