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Iowa State University

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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Nature and Society Relations

Representation, Resistance, And Rhetoric: Bananas Catalyze Campus Activism, Abby M. Dubisar, Gabrielle E. Roesch-Mcnally Jan 2018

Representation, Resistance, And Rhetoric: Bananas Catalyze Campus Activism, Abby M. Dubisar, Gabrielle E. Roesch-Mcnally

English Publications

Examining food and agricultural systems cultivates nuanced understandings of rhetoric, campus activism, and cultural and scientific meanings of food. At Iowa State University, the banana has provoked discussions regarding biotechnology—prompting debates with competing narratives about food and agricultural systems. Because of its status as a genetically modified food (developed in campus food sciences and human nutrition labs and purportedly able to address hunger and malnutrition in the Global South), this particular biotech banana prompted reactions from sustainable agriculture students with social and ecological justice concerns. For those working at land grant universities conducting food and agriculture research especially, teaching ...


Pre-Colonial Foodways, Christina Gish Hill Jan 2016

Pre-Colonial Foodways, Christina Gish Hill

World Languages and Cultures Publications

By the time Europeans reached the shores of the Americas, the Indigenous peoples of the northern continent had developed food systems that efficiently utilized their abundant landscape to provide a relatively nutritious diet. The diversity of Indigenous food ways mirrored the diversity of the ecosystems of each people’s homeland. Lush forests east of the Mississippi harbored plentiful game and provided fertile soil for fields of corn, beans, and squash. Peoples who lived along the ocean coasts gathered tidewater resources, like shellfish, seaweed, and sea urchins. They also perfected seafaring vessels that could take them far from land, even to ...


Strengthening Families: Exploring The Impacts Of Family Camp Experiences On Family Functioning And Parenting, Barry A. Garst, Sarah Baughman, Nancy K. Franz, Richard W. Seidel Jan 2013

Strengthening Families: Exploring The Impacts Of Family Camp Experiences On Family Functioning And Parenting, Barry A. Garst, Sarah Baughman, Nancy K. Franz, Richard W. Seidel

Extension and Outreach Research and Scholarship

Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods study was conducted with 60 families across 18 camps. Respondents shared that family camp experiences benefit families because of the positive impacts of the camp staff, parenting reinforcement, and enhancement of family relationships, with 60% of respondents indicating that family camp experiences reinforced good parenting and 86% of respondents indicating ...


Offer Adolescents Suburban Habitat Positive Experiences In Their Neighborhood, Benjamin A. Shirtcliff Jan 2010

Offer Adolescents Suburban Habitat Positive Experiences In Their Neighborhood, Benjamin A. Shirtcliff

Benjamin A Shirtcliff

The adolescent population living in suburban environments is very important. This reality, however, is still too recent to be considered by practitioners of the development, which would explain why the physical environment of teenagers is rarely designed to meet their needs. This article addresses the basic needs of adolescents living in the suburbs and designers suggest ways to improve their quality of life by creating fallback places in their neighborhood. The values ​​and adolescents special needs will be used to assess the quality of suburban open spaces. We mainly interressted in the physical environment, building on the studies in the ...


Systematics Of Dirca (Thymelaeaceae) Based On Its Sequences And Issr Polymorphisms, James A. Schrader, William R. Graves Dec 2004

Systematics Of Dirca (Thymelaeaceae) Based On Its Sequences And Issr Polymorphisms, James A. Schrader, William R. Graves

Horticulture Publications

The genus Dirca consists of three disjunct species of shrubs. Dirca palustris is found in the eastern United States and adjacent Canada; D, occidcntahs is Umited to six counties near the San Francisco Bay in California; and the recently discovered D, mcxicana is known from one isolated population in northeastern Mexico. The three species have been described and classified according to morphological characters, but the morphological evidence does not provide a clear assessment of the relationships among the species. Morphologically D. mexicana most closely resembles D. occidenlalis., but known biogeographical trends raise doubt regarding how the three species are interrelated ...


An American At Westonbirt: My Garden At The 2005 Westonbirt Festival Of The Garden, Miriam Engler Jan 2004

An American At Westonbirt: My Garden At The 2005 Westonbirt Festival Of The Garden, Miriam Engler

Landscape Architecture Publications

Garden festivals first captured my attention 10 years ago with their intense, poetic images and previously unseen garden forms-sprouting woven willow fences; beach chairs and sun collectors strewn about a sunflower field; floating islands of exotic plants surrounded by glass bottles; a caged frozen bird hanging on a dead white tree; blue glass gravel beads. Like poetry, these temporary garden creations are succinct and intense, distilling an idea into a calculated, original, formal composition. Instead of words, they comprise selective plants, materials, and patterns.


A Natural Area Inventory Of Ames, Iowa , William Russell Norris Jan 1995

A Natural Area Inventory Of Ames, Iowa , William Russell Norris

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Perhaps no state in the Union has suffered such widespread degradation of its natural vegetation as Iowa. Tallgrass prairie (including wet prairie communities, often considered to be wetlands) once covered at least 85% of this state's land area, but more than 99.9% of Iowa's original grasslands have fallen victim to the plow (Smith 1990). Wetlands once covered 11.1% of Iowa's landscape (Dahl 1990), but virtually all of these have been drained to make way for rowcrops (wetlands now cover only 1.2% of Iowa's landscape). Roughly 12 to 20% of the state was covered ...


A Developmental Approach To The Adoption Of Low-Input Farming Practices, Rebecca S. Roberts, David Lighthall Jan 1993

A Developmental Approach To The Adoption Of Low-Input Farming Practices, Rebecca S. Roberts, David Lighthall

Leopold Center Completed Grant Reports

While it is true that a significant, growing minority of Iowa farmers are successfully adopting low-input systems such as ridge till— and are profiting as a result—the vast majority of Iowa farmers continue to practice conventional, chemically intensive methods. Moreover, there exists a counter-trend in Corn Belt agriculture toward no-till systems. While notill systems conserve soil resources, they often require more fertilizer and herbicides.