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Empowering Young Children: Multi-Method Exploration Of Young Children’S Preference For Natural Or Manufactured Elements In Outdoor Preschool Settings, Zahra Zamani Apr 2015

Empowering Young Children: Multi-Method Exploration Of Young Children’S Preference For Natural Or Manufactured Elements In Outdoor Preschool Settings, Zahra Zamani

Zahra Zamani

When designing play environments for children, it is critical to understand children’s accounts of their experiences rather than making inferences based on observations or parental report. However, limited data is available on the views of young children. Further, few studies have focused on understanding young children’s perspective on enjoyable cognitive play opportunities via different elements in outdoor settings. Emphasizing on the value of hearing children’s voices, this study combined drawings, photo preferences, and interview methods to understand the perspectives of 22 four- to five-year-old children. These children were enrolled in a preschool with a manufactured, mixed, and ...


Association Of Children's Perceived Access And Sense Of Affinity And Stewardship Towards Nature Within Tehran's Schoolyards., Zahra Zamani Dec 2012

Association Of Children's Perceived Access And Sense Of Affinity And Stewardship Towards Nature Within Tehran's Schoolyards., Zahra Zamani

Zahra Zamani

Interacting with natural environments during childhood can impact children’s mental and physical well being. Comprehending children’s environmental orientation is a significant topic as their chance for contact with nature is decreasing. In this research, natural environments are considered as spaces that incorporate a variety of trees and vegetation that are free of human control, or part of human’s manipulation (such as in zoo, park, gardens, etc.). However, urbanized conditions and lifestyles have limited children’s daily contact opportunities with natural environments. This disconnection with nature is defined as “natural deficit disorder” (Louv, 2005), which can impact children ...