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Full-Text Articles in Nature and Society Relations

Wildlife In U.S. Cities: Managing Unwanted Animals, John Hadidian Nov 2015

Wildlife In U.S. Cities: Managing Unwanted Animals, John Hadidian

Conservation Collection

Conflicts between people and wild animals in cities are undoubtedly as old as urban living itself. In the United States it is only of late, however, that many of the species now found in cities have come to live there. The increasing kind and number of human-wildlife conflicts in urbanizing environments makes it a priority that effective and humane means of conflict resolution be found. The urban public wants conflicts with wildlife resolved humanely, but needs to know what the alternative management approaches are, and what ethical standards should guide their use. This paper examines contemporary urban wildlife control in ...


Promoting Predators And Compassionate Conservation, Arian D. Wallach, Marc Bekoff, Michael Paul Nelson, David Ramp Oct 2015

Promoting Predators And Compassionate Conservation, Arian D. Wallach, Marc Bekoff, Michael Paul Nelson, David Ramp

Conservation Collection

No abstract provided.


Whaling: Don’T Trade The Moratorium Away, Mark Peter Simmonds, Sue Fisher Feb 2012

Whaling: Don’T Trade The Moratorium Away, Mark Peter Simmonds, Sue Fisher

Conservation Collection

In their proposal to allocate ‘whale shares’ to both whalers and conservationists as an alternative to the International Whaling Commission (IWC) moratorium on commercial whaling, Christopher Costello and colleagues overlook several factors (Nature 481, 139–140; 2012).


Integrating Values And Ethics Into Wildlife Policy And Management—Lessons From North America, Camilla H. Fox, Marc Bekoff Mar 2011

Integrating Values And Ethics Into Wildlife Policy And Management—Lessons From North America, Camilla H. Fox, Marc Bekoff

Conservation Collection

Few animals provoke as wide a range of emotions as wolves. Some see wolves as icons of a lost wilderness; others see them as intruders. As the battle continues between wolf proponents and opponents, finding solutions that resolve conflicts while supporting the integrity of nature is challenging. In this essay we argue that we need to make room for wolves and other native carnivores who are re-colonizing areas from which they were extirpated. Strategies that foster coexistence are necessary and wildlife agencies must consider all stakeholders and invest adequate resources to inform the public about how to mitigate conflicts between ...


Urban Wildlife Control: It Starts In Our Own Backyard, John Hadidian Jan 2001

Urban Wildlife Control: It Starts In Our Own Backyard, John Hadidian

Conservation Collection

No abstract provided.


Injuries To Birds Of Prey Caught In Leghold Traps, Katherine Durham Jan 1981

Injuries To Birds Of Prey Caught In Leghold Traps, Katherine Durham

Conservation Collection

173 birds of prey, including 32 Bald Eagles, have been treated for trapping injuries at the University of Minnesota Raptor Research and Rehabilitation Program since 1972. These were birds caught primarily in "open" bait /eghold sets incidental to furbearer trapping in the Minnesota region. The differential outcome of the injuries with respect to crippling or mortality is presented for large versus small raptors, toe versus leg injuries, and fracture of the leg versus soft tissue damage only.

There is only limited potential for mitigating the effects of trapping injuries to raptors because of the irreversible soft tissue damage usually associated ...


The Coyote (Canis Latrans) In Panama, Eustorgio Méndez, Francisco Delgádo, Demetrio Miranda Jan 1981

The Coyote (Canis Latrans) In Panama, Eustorgio Méndez, Francisco Delgádo, Demetrio Miranda

Conservation Collection

This report reveals that the coyote, Canis Iatrans, has recently extended its southern range to Panama. The skin of one adult female coyote killed by hunters at Los Pirales, a farm near Gualaca in Chiriqui Province, western Panama, has been deposited in the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory Vertebrate Collection. Other coyotes have been observed in Alanje, Boquete and Boqueron, other localities of the same province. The probable range of the coyote in Panama is indicated, and the need for an urgent management strategy for this canid in the Republic is also expressed.