Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Economy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1995

Discipline
Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Political Economy

Paul Krugman And The Illusion Of The Illusion Of Conflict In International Trade, Spencer J. Pack Jul 1995

Paul Krugman And The Illusion Of The Illusion Of Conflict In International Trade, Spencer J. Pack

Economics Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Flattened Rates, Broadened Base, Eric B. Travers May 1995

Flattened Rates, Broadened Base, Eric B. Travers

All-College Writing Contest

No abstract provided.


Nafta Integration: Unproductive Finance And Real Unemployment, Melvin Burke Apr 1995

Nafta Integration: Unproductive Finance And Real Unemployment, Melvin Burke

School of Economics Faculty Scholarship

NAFTA did not begin on January 1, 1994, but rather, many years earlier in 1988 with the Canadian/USA Free Trade Agreement and with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari's economic reforms. The latest Mexican crisis is but the historic continuation of its 1982 debt crisis. Both are part of the larger global stagnation crisis which began in the 1970s and continues today. NAFTA is not a free trade agreement, but rather the creation of a North American trade block, designed and implemented by American multinational corporations to obtain a greater share of a stagnant global output. It is not ...


The Balanced Budget Amendment: A Time Bomb To Subvert American Prosperity, Hyman P. Minsky Ph.D. Feb 1995

The Balanced Budget Amendment: A Time Bomb To Subvert American Prosperity, Hyman P. Minsky Ph.D.

Hyman P. Minsky Archive

Paper dated Feb. 13, 1995.

Summary of a Report: ’A Time Bomb to Subvert American Prosperity’.


Diseconomies Of School District Size, Robert Sexton Jan 1995

Diseconomies Of School District Size, Robert Sexton

Robert L Sexton

No abstract provided.


What's Wrong With Exploitation?, Justin Schwartz Jan 1995

What's Wrong With Exploitation?, Justin Schwartz

Justin Schwartz

Abstract: Marx thinks that capitalism is exploitative, and that is a major basis for his objections to it. But what's wrong with exploitation, as Marx sees it? (The paper is exegetical in character: my object is to understand what Marx believed,) The received view, held by Norman Geras, G.A. Cohen, and others, is that Marx thought that capitalism was unjust, because in the crudest sense, capitalists robbed labor of property that was rightfully the workers' because the workers and not the capitalists produced it. This view depends on a Labor Theory of Property (LTP), that property rights are ...


In Defence Of Exploitation, Justin Schwartz Jan 1995

In Defence Of Exploitation, Justin Schwartz

Justin Schwartz

The concept of exploitation is thought to be central to Marx's Critique of capitalism. John Roemer, an analytical (then-) Marxist economist now at Yale, attacked this idea in a series of papers and books in the 1970s-1990s, arguing that Marxists should be concerned with inequality rather than exploitation -- with distribution rather than production, precisely the opposite of what Marx urged in The Critique of the Gotha Progam.

This paper expounds and criticizes Roemer's objections and his alternative inequality based theory of exploitation, while accepting some of his criticisms. It may be viewed as a companion paper to my ...


Philosophy, Rationality And Argumentation (Libro: Filosofía, Racionalidad Y Argumentación) Spanish, Fernando Estrada Jan 1995

Philosophy, Rationality And Argumentation (Libro: Filosofía, Racionalidad Y Argumentación) Spanish, Fernando Estrada

Fernando Estrada

My interest is to understand the problems with some careful handling of the issues, I believe, relevant. Aristotle, Sophocles, Descartes, Hobbes, Kant, Foucault, Popper and other thinkers, are analyzed in their own texts, or in other cases of individual straight to interpret the problems they posed. It is "the freedom the individual, "" democracy "," body "," man, "language" "Ethics," "rationality," "the argumentacin" etc.. For the reader is book support, a resource for which he is challenged to read reseados texts, a letter with ways to analyze in different directions to locate each one that cause you most concern


Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves Jan 1995

Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves

PHILIP E GRAVES

After an extensive discussion of the nature of the interactions among unions, corporations, and government, we find that government in granting privileges to workers organized into unions implicitly taxes capital formation. The result has been to lessen the attention business decisions pay to the future, to substitute excessive wages for appropriate capital investment, and to reduce the competitive vitality of major U.S. industries.


1995 American Incentive System Almanac, Don P. Diffine Ph.D. Jan 1995

1995 American Incentive System Almanac, Don P. Diffine Ph.D.

Belden Center Monographs

No abstract provided.


Missing Links In The Study Of Puerto Rican Poverty In The United States, James Jennings Jan 1995

Missing Links In The Study Of Puerto Rican Poverty In The United States, James Jennings

William Monroe Trotter Institute Publications

This Occasional Paper, based on a presentation to the National Puerto Rican Coalition in Washington, DC, in 1992, proposes some limitations in "quantitative-only" research focusing on Puerto Rican poverty in the United States. An overreliance on quantitative-based analysis, as well as overlooking historical and comparative data, may not allow for a full understanding and awareness of the nature and maintenance of poverty in Puerto Rican communities in the United States. While the presentation acknowledges the importance of sophisticated quantitative research, it implies that joined together with historical and comparative analysis, investigations of Puerto Rican poverty would be vastly improved. An ...


Adam Smith’S Unnaturally Natural (Nonetheless Naturally Unnatural) Use Of The Word Natural, Spencer J. Pack Jan 1995

Adam Smith’S Unnaturally Natural (Nonetheless Naturally Unnatural) Use Of The Word Natural, Spencer J. Pack

Economics Faculty Publications

Natural and nature are complex words, fraught with ambiguity and contradiction. This paper does not attempt to give a complete account of Smith's use of these words. However, it does demonstrate that Smith did not necessarily approve of what he called "natural" or "nature". Economists and others who assume otherwise are in error. A study, analysis, and/or interpretation of Smith's work which depends upon this (at times unstated) assumption - that Smith necessarily approved of "nature" or the "natural"- needs to be read with great care; perhaps even incredulity.1


Regulatory Competition, Regulatory Capture, And Corporate Self-Regulation, William W. Bratton, Joseph A. Mccahery Prof Jan 1995

Regulatory Competition, Regulatory Capture, And Corporate Self-Regulation, William W. Bratton, Joseph A. Mccahery Prof

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Use Of Contingent Valuation Methodology In Natural Resource Damage Assessments: Legal Fact And Economic Fiction., Brian R. Binger, Robert F. Copple, Elizabeth Hoffman Jan 1995

The Use Of Contingent Valuation Methodology In Natural Resource Damage Assessments: Legal Fact And Economic Fiction., Brian R. Binger, Robert F. Copple, Elizabeth Hoffman

Economics Publications

The creation of comprehensive statutory schemes for protection of the environment has required the legal system to focus on the definition problems associated with environmental goods and with the physical, tmeporal, and aesthetic considerations related to such goods. Clearly, the events of the twentieth century have taught us that individual physical components of the natural environment, such as streams, forests, wildlife, and biota, do not exist in isolation. Instead, these components are part of the interrelated environmental systems that may, in turn, impact other environmental systems. Likewise, damage to one or more of the components of a system can result ...


Restrictiong Taxation: The Impact Of Proposition 13 On California Tax And Expenditure Trends, Robert L. Sexton, Gary M. Galles Dec 1994

Restrictiong Taxation: The Impact Of Proposition 13 On California Tax And Expenditure Trends, Robert L. Sexton, Gary M. Galles

Robert L Sexton

No abstract provided.


Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves Dec 1994

Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves

Robert L Sexton

After an extensive discussion of the nature of the interactions among unions, corporations, and government, we find that government in granting privileges to workers organized into unions implicitly taxes capital formation. The result has been to lessen the attention business decisions pay to the future, to substitute excessive wages for appropriate capital investment, and to reduce the competitive vitality of major U.S. industries.


Restricting Taxation: The Impact Of Proposition 13 On California Tax And Expenditure Trends, Robert L. Sexton, Gary M. Galles, James E. Long Dec 1994

Restricting Taxation: The Impact Of Proposition 13 On California Tax And Expenditure Trends, Robert L. Sexton, Gary M. Galles, James E. Long

Robert L Sexton

Abstract: This paper examines trends in California taxes and expenditures at the state and local level. In particular, it considers whether Proposition 13, which has been blamed by politicians and the press for virtually every ensuing fiscal problem facing state and local governments in California, deserves such criticism, or whether the roots of those problems lie elsewhere.


Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves Dec 1994

Union Myopia And The Taxation Of Capital, Dwight Lee, Robert L. Sexton, Philip E. Graves

Robert L Sexton

After an extensive discussion of the nature of the interactions among unions, corporations, and government, we find that government in granting privileges to workers organized into unions implicitly taxes capital formation. The result has been to lessen the attention business decisions pay to the future, to substitute excessive wages for appropriate capital investment, and to reduce the competitive vitality of major U.S. industries.