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Full-Text Articles in Other Economics

Employment And Wage Dynamics In Estonia, 1989-95, Rivo Noorkoiv, Peter F. Orazem, Allan Puur, Milan Vodopivec Nov 1998

Employment And Wage Dynamics In Estonia, 1989-95, Rivo Noorkoiv, Peter F. Orazem, Allan Puur, Milan Vodopivec

Economics Publications

This study monitors the effects of economic transition on wages and employment in a former Soviet Republic. Estonia's case is of particular interest because of its early adoption of relatively free labour market policies. Relative wages for the highest educated groups rose for all age groups. There were also rapid increases in returns to job experience, particularly at young ages. Increasing wage dispersion across human capital groups was accompanied by narrowing wage dispersion within human capital groups. Relative wages rose in sectors which gained relative employment, while they fell in shrinking sectors. In addition, there were large flows of ...


Chinese Consumer Demand For Animal Products And Implications For U.S. Pork And Poultry Exports, Qingbin Wang, Frank Fuller, Dermot J. Hayes, Catherine Halbrendt Jul 1998

Chinese Consumer Demand For Animal Products And Implications For U.S. Pork And Poultry Exports, Qingbin Wang, Frank Fuller, Dermot J. Hayes, Catherine Halbrendt

Economics Publications

This paper examines Chinese consumer preference for major animal products and assesses the potential impacts of a reduction in China’s import tariff on its pork and poultry demand and net import. Our analysis suggests that China’s demand for animal products will continue to grow as income increases. Using a trade model, results of our scenario analysis indicate that a reduction in China’s import tariffs will significantly increase its net pork and poultry imports and the U.S. will capture most of the increases. Nevertheless, the impact on the market price in China and the U.S. is ...


Survey Instruments For A Cost Study Of Haccp In The Seafood Industry, Julie Caswell Apr 1998

Survey Instruments For A Cost Study Of Haccp In The Seafood Industry, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points approach to assuring food safety was first mandated in the United States in 1995 for the seafood industry, with full implementation to take place by December, 1997. The Survey Instruments included in this Working Paper were developed as part of a cost analysis of the adoption of HACCP in the Seafood Industry. The purpose of the Survey was to quantify the change in costs that average seafood companies experienced during the first year of HACCP adoption.


Murray Rothbard’S Adam Smith, Spencer J. Pack Apr 1998

Murray Rothbard’S Adam Smith, Spencer J. Pack

Economics Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Standardization And The Stability Of Collusion, Luca Lambertini, Sougata Poddar, Dan Sasaki Mar 1998

Standardization And The Stability Of Collusion, Luca Lambertini, Sougata Poddar, Dan Sasaki

Economics Faculty Articles and Research

We characterize the interplay between firms' decision in terms of product standardization and the nature of their ensuing market behaviour. We prove the existence of a non-monotone relationship between firms' decision at the product stage and their intertemporal preferences.


Alternative Rebate Rules In The Provision Of A Threshold Public Good: An Experimental Investigation, Melanie Marks, Rachel Croson Feb 1998

Alternative Rebate Rules In The Provision Of A Threshold Public Good: An Experimental Investigation, Melanie Marks, Rachel Croson

Operations, Information and Decisions Papers

This study reports the effects of rebate rules on voluntary contributions to a threshold public good. Rebate rules specify how excess contributions, over the threshold amount are distributed. We examine three rebate rules experimentally: a no rebate policy where excess contributions are discarded, a proportional rebate policy where excess contributions are rebated proportionally to an individual's contribution, and a utilization rebate policy where excess contributions provide some continuous public good. Significantly more Nash equilibrium outcomes are observed under the no rebate treatment than under either of the other two. Interestingly, the variance of contributions differs significantly between rebate treatments.


Network Structure And Entry In The Deregulated Airline Industry, Joseph Berechman, Sougata Poddar, Oz Shy Jan 1998

Network Structure And Entry In The Deregulated Airline Industry, Joseph Berechman, Sougata Poddar, Oz Shy

Economics Faculty Articles and Research

We explore how an incumbent airline firm structures its route network under the threat of entry caused by deregulation. We show that entry induces the incumbent firm to strategically alter its flight operating network from a fully connected network (FC) to a hub-and-spoke network (HS). While most of the literature always assumed that the use of of HS network is primarily for the purpose of cost reduction, we show that hub-and-spoke operation can be used as a strategic device by the incumbent firm when it faces a threat of entry in its operating zone.


Moving From Uniform To Variable Fertilizer Rates On Iowa Corn: Effects On Rates And Returns, Bruce A. Babcock, Gregory R. Pautsch Jan 1998

Moving From Uniform To Variable Fertilizer Rates On Iowa Corn: Effects On Rates And Returns, Bruce A. Babcock, Gregory R. Pautsch

Economics Publications

This study develops a model based on the yield potential of various soil types in 12 Iowa counties to estimate the potential value of switching from uniform to variable fertilizer rates. Results indicate modest increases in the gross returns over fertilizer costs, ranging from $7.43 to $1.52 per acre. The net profitability of variable-rate technology (VRT) is sensitive to the per acre costs of moving to a VRT program. Under the assumptions of the model, applying variable rates would increase yield by 0.05 to 0.50 bushels per acre, and would reduce fertilizer costs by $1.19 ...


Active Intermediation In Overlapping Generations Economies With Production And Unsecured Debt, Mark Pingle, Leigh Tesfatsion Jan 1998

Active Intermediation In Overlapping Generations Economies With Production And Unsecured Debt, Mark Pingle, Leigh Tesfatsion

Economics Publications

It is well known that the first welfare theorem can fail for overlapping generations economies with private production and unsecured debt. This paper demonstrates that the reason for this failure is that intermediation is modeled as a purely passive coordination activity implemented by a Walrasian Auctioneer. When intermediation is modeled instead as a contestable activity carried out by a corporate intermediary owned by consumer-shareholders and operated in their interest, every equilibrium is Pareto efficient. In broader terms, these findings caution that the inefficiency observed in standard modelings of overlapping generations economies may not be the reflection of an intrinsic market ...


How Labeling Of Safety And Process Attributes Affects Markets For Food, Julie Caswell Dec 1997

How Labeling Of Safety And Process Attributes Affects Markets For Food, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Consumers are increasingly considering information on the safety and process (how foods are produced) attributes of food in making their buying decisions, Producers, processors, and retailers may choose voluntary labeling of these attributes, may be required to label by government regulations, or may use a combination of these approaches, The market effects depend on consumer perceptions of the attributes, the benefits and costs of labeling for companies, and the goals of government policy, These effects are illustrated through a discussion of labeling of foods that are produced with the use of biotechnology (genetically modified organisms) or that are organically grown.


Comparative Levels Of Food Safety Regulations In Three U.S.-Asian Trading Groups, Yuan Wang, Julie Caswell Dec 1997

Comparative Levels Of Food Safety Regulations In Three U.S.-Asian Trading Groups, Yuan Wang, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

U.S.-Asian trade currently represents about 35% of the total value of U.S. agricultural and food trade. Country-by-country comparisons show significant differences in level of food safety regulations in the U.S., Japan, newly industrialized countries in Asia, and Asian developing countries. These disparities result in significantly different import requirements that may impede trade in agricultural and food products.