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Full-Text Articles in Other Economics

Life Satisfaction Over Time Among Rural Low-Income Mothers, Sheila Mammen, Jean Bauer, Daniel Lass Jan 2009

Life Satisfaction Over Time Among Rural Low-Income Mothers, Sheila Mammen, Jean Bauer, Daniel Lass

Sheila Mammen

The satisfaction with life (SWL) among rural low-income mothers was assessed using a sample of 163 mothers who participated in a multi-state, three-year longitudinal study. Dependent variables included those that represented various forms of capital (health, human, personal and social) as well as the mothers’ levels of life satisfaction from prior years. Nearly two-thirds of the rural mothers were satisfied with their life in all three years. Their level of satisfaction appeared to be constant, however, such persistence had a time frame of only one year. In all three years, their depression score and the adequacy of their income had ...


Optimal Choice Of Voluntary Traceability As A Food Risk Management Tool, Dm Souza Monteiro,, Julie Caswell Aug 2008

Optimal Choice Of Voluntary Traceability As A Food Risk Management Tool, Dm Souza Monteiro,, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Traceability systems are information tools implemented within and between firms in food chains to improve logistics and transparency or to reduce total food safety damage costs. Information about location and condition of products is critical when food safety incidents arise. This paper uses a principal-agent model to investigate the optimal choice of voluntary traceability in terms of precision of information on a given attribute at each link of a food chain. The results suggest that four scenarios may emerge for the supply chain depending on the costs of a system and whether or not the industry can internalize total food ...


The Benefits And Costs Of Proliferation Of Geographical Labeling For Developing Countries, Julie Caswell Jan 2008

The Benefits And Costs Of Proliferation Of Geographical Labeling For Developing Countries, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Food product attributes related to geographical origins are a topical issue in global food trade. The provision of geographical labelling may occur through geographical indications under the mandated trade rules of the TRIPS Agreement, trademarks, or country-of-origin labelling. The overall effect of the expansion of geographical labelling on developing countries depends on a complex mix of market opportunities that may yield substantial benefits as well as implementation costs. Increasingly, the analysis of this overall effect will need to evaluate the joint impacts of different forms of geographical labelling on the market position of developing countries.


Labor Supply Decisions Of Rural Low-Income Mothers, Daniel Lass Jan 2007

Labor Supply Decisions Of Rural Low-Income Mothers, Daniel Lass

Daniel A. Lass

Labor force participation is crucial to the economic well-being of low-income rural families. This study identified the factors that influence two decisions that low-income rural mothers make regarding their employment: labor force entry and number of hours supplied to employment. The sample consisted of 412 rural low-income mothers who participated in a multi-state study. The logistic regression model correctly predicted 80 percent of their work participation decisions. Employed rural mothers appeared to be older, better educated, and less likely to suffer from depression compared to those not working. Additionally, they were more likely to have an employed partner, a driver ...


Teaching With Technology To Engage Students And Enhance Learning, Daniel Lass, Bernard Morzuch, Richard Rogers Jan 2007

Teaching With Technology To Engage Students And Enhance Learning, Daniel Lass, Bernard Morzuch, Richard Rogers

Daniel A. Lass

Teaching technology effects on student learning in a large lecture introductory statistics course were tested. Findings show in-class personal response systems and on-line homework/quizzes significantly improve student exam scores. We infer proven small class techniques, participating in class and doing homework via technologies, can restore sound pedagogy in larger classes. The experiment was conducted using just one class, but factors usually unaccounted for in assessment research were controlled, especially the instructor and other materials. The technologies investigated here can provide learning benefits to students even in larger courses often criticized for their inability to provide students quality learning experiences.


Standards-As-Barriers Versus Standards-As-Catalysts: Assessing The Impact Of Haccp Implementation On U.S. Seafood Imports, Julie Caswell Jan 2007

Standards-As-Barriers Versus Standards-As-Catalysts: Assessing The Impact Of Haccp Implementation On U.S. Seafood Imports, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

The United States mandated a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) food safety standard for seafood in 1997. Panel model results for the period 1990 to 2004 suggest that HACCP introduction had a negative and significant impact on overall seafood imports from the top 33 suppliers. While the effect for developed countries was positive, the negative HACCP effect for developing countries supports the view of “standards-as-barriers” versus ”standards-as-catalysts.” When the effect is analyzed at an individual country level a different perspective emerges. Regardless of development status, leading seafood exporters generally gained sales volume with the U.S., while most other ...


Interaction Between Food Attributes In Markets: The Case Of Environmental Labeling, Gillies Grolleau, Julie Caswell Jan 2007

Interaction Between Food Attributes In Markets: The Case Of Environmental Labeling, Gillies Grolleau, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Some consumers derive utility from using products produced with specific processes, such as environmentally friendly practices. Means of verifying these credence attributes, such as certification, are necessary for the market to function effectively. A substitute or complementary solution may exist when consumers perceive a relationship between a process attribute and other verifiable product attributes. We present a model where the level of search and experience attributes influences the likelihood of production of eco-friendly products. Our results suggest that the market success of eco-friendly food products requires a mix of environmental and other verifiable attributes that together signal credibility.


Introduction: Economic Measures Of Food Safety Interventions, Julie Caswell Jan 2007

Introduction: Economic Measures Of Food Safety Interventions, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

EconLit Citations: Q18, I18, L51 © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Agribusiness 23: 153–156, 2007.


Risk Management In The Integrated Nafta Market: Lessons From The Case Of Bse, Julie Caswell, David Sparling Jan 2005

Risk Management In The Integrated Nafta Market: Lessons From The Case Of Bse, Julie Caswell, David Sparling

Julie Caswell

No abstract provided.


Food Safety: What Is Economists’ Value Added?, Julie Caswell Jun 2003

Food Safety: What Is Economists’ Value Added?, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Economists are contributing to the food safety arena by analyzing demand for food safety, the consumer level benefits of improved food safety, the costs and benefits to companies from quality assurance for food safety, and the benefits and costs of government regulations aimed at improving food safety. In the food safety area, too much attention has been paid to risk assessment and not enough to risk management. Economists have a very important role to play in improving private and public risk management in areas such as pathogen reduction, use of traceability, and biotechnology.


Quantifying Regulatory Barriers To Asian–U.S. Food Trade, Julie Caswell Jan 2001

Quantifying Regulatory Barriers To Asian–U.S. Food Trade, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

Data on U.S. Food and Drug Administration import detentions and alerts are used to quantify regulatory barriers experienced by Asian food products entering the United States. These data offer the only comprehensive means of assessing regulatory barriers without relying on expert opinion, although they fall short of placing a dollar value on the volume of trade affected. The data show that meeting food regulations is a significant barrier to Asian food products entering the United States, especially for products originating in developing and newly industrialized countries.


Consumer Choice Of Food Products And The Implications For Price Competition And For An Analysis Of Government Policy, Julie Caswell May 2000

Consumer Choice Of Food Products And The Implications For Price Competition And For An Analysis Of Government Policy, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

In this paper we develop a random coefficients discrete choice model to investigate what affected consumer demand for prepared frozen meals from 1993 to 1998, when government regulation of nutrition labeling changed from voluntary to mandatory. The model links individual consumer characteristics (e.g., income, knowledge about nutrition, nutrition label use) to underlying product characteristics (e.g., price, nutritional attributes) and allows us to obtain preference parameters for each consumer as well as demand elasticities with regard to product characteristics for each product considered. We find that prices, advertising, price reductions, and consumer preferences for taste have a significant effect ...


Food Quality: Safety, Nutrition, And Labeling, Julie Caswell Jan 1994

Food Quality: Safety, Nutrition, And Labeling, Julie Caswell

Julie Caswell

This paper discussed food quality issues associated with both food safety and food nutritional content. Policy approaches to satisfying consumer demands for safe, nutritious food are described from administrative as well as economic perspectives. Current priority issues include instituting better ways of reducing risks from microbial pathogens, from agricultural chemical residues, and on the nutritional front enhancing the nutritional profile of consumers' diets. Nutrition labeling changes have been achieved. Thus, dietary change must be attained primarily through effective means of enhancing nutritional knowledge, changing attitudes and, ultimately, behavior. The paper concludes by considering the development of the next agricultural/food ...