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Hospitality education

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Generic Skills For Hospitality Management: A Comparative Study Of Management Expectations And Student Perceptions, Michael Raybould, Hugh Wilkins Jul 2006

Generic Skills For Hospitality Management: A Comparative Study Of Management Expectations And Student Perceptions, Michael Raybould, Hugh Wilkins

Michael Raybould

Tertiary providers of hospitality management degree programs must fulfil the needs of student, industry and academic stakeholder groups. The students attracted to this type of program tend to be motivated primarily by the anticipated vocational outcomes. As a result, hospitality management curriculum needs to meet both industry and student expectations by delivering the skill sets needed in the workplace and the institutional demands for academic rigour. This article reports on research that aimed to compare hospitality managers' expectations of graduate skills with student perceptions of the skills that hospitality managers valued. In contrast to previous research on this topic, this ...


Over Qualified And Under Experienced – Turning Graduates Into Hospitality Managers, Michael Raybould, Hugh Wilkins Dec 2004

Over Qualified And Under Experienced – Turning Graduates Into Hospitality Managers, Michael Raybould, Hugh Wilkins

Michael Raybould

Purpose – This paper sets out to report on research that investigated hospitality managers' expectations of graduate skills and compared those expectations with student perceptions of what hospitality managers value. Design/methodology/approach – The research adopted a generic skills framework and data were collected through a sample survey of 850 Australian hospitality managers and 211 undergraduate hospitality management students. Findings – Managers rated skills associated with interpersonal, problem solving, and self-management skill domains as most important while students appeared to have realistic perceptions of the skills that managers value when recruiting hospitality graduates. The most substantial areas of disagreement came in those ...