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Tense Positioning: Labeling And Tension In Kofuku No Kagaku's Development, Jackson Layne Hale May 2014

Tense Positioning: Labeling And Tension In Kofuku No Kagaku's Development, Jackson Layne Hale

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Exploring The Neighborhood Preferences Of A Segment Of Millennials In Omaha, Nebraska, Aaron Kloke Apr 2014

Exploring The Neighborhood Preferences Of A Segment Of Millennials In Omaha, Nebraska, Aaron Kloke

Community and Regional Planning Program: Professional Projects

In 2010, Millennials, or those between 18 and 34, surpassed the Baby Boomers in population size. Today, Millennials, also known as Generation Y, make up over 25 percent of the United States’ population. In Omaha, they make up 26.9 percent of the population. The next largest generation in Omaha, the Baby Boomers, make for 19.2 percent of the population. Clearly, this emerging demographic has the ability to change the way we create and design our built environment if it so chooses.

To review how this generation may choose to change the way we design our future neighborhoods, national ...


Diversity And Social Capital In The U.S: A Tale Of Conflict, Contact Or Total Mistrust?, Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere, Willie Belton, Yameen Huq Dec 2013

Diversity And Social Capital In The U.S: A Tale Of Conflict, Contact Or Total Mistrust?, Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere, Willie Belton, Yameen Huq

Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere

In this paper we explore the relationship between ethnic fractionalization and social capital. First, we test for time differences in the impact of ethnic fractionalization on social capital using U.S. data from 1990, 1997 and 2005. Subsequently we examine the data for evidence of the conflict, contact and hunker-down theories espoused by Putman in explaining what happens over time when individuals interact with those of differing ethnicities. We find no evidence of heterogeneity in the impact of ethnic fractionalization on social capital over time. In addition we find evidence of the conflict theory and no evidence of hunker-down or ...