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Political Economy

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The Missing Pieces Of The Economic Debate Over Immigration Reform, Exequiel Hernandez Aug 2018

The Missing Pieces Of The Economic Debate Over Immigration Reform, Exequiel Hernandez

Wharton Public Policy Initiative Issue Briefs

To the extent that immigration reform is discussed in terms of economics, the debate tends to focus exclusively on labor issues-specifically, how immigrants affect jobs and wages for native citizens. But to understand the economic effects of immigration, and thus develop sounder policies, policymakers need to consider how immigration affects all three core components of economic growth: not just labor, but capital and innovation too.

In the Penn Wharton Public Policy Brief, "The Missing Pieces of the Economic Debate Over Immigration Reform/whr.tn/2vmKbK8>," Professor Exequiel Hernandez discusses new research showing that immigration produces gains for the U.S ...


Grameen Microfinance: An Evaluation Of The Successes And Limitations Of The Grameen Bank, Ana Maria Moreno Aug 2010

Grameen Microfinance: An Evaluation Of The Successes And Limitations Of The Grameen Bank, Ana Maria Moreno

Honors Theses (PPE)

The Grameen Bank has attracted worldwide attention by providing small loans to poor people across rural villages in Bangladesh. In 2006 the Nobel Committee awarded the Grameen Bank and its founder Professor Mohammad Yunus the Nobel Peace Prize for their, “efforts to create economic and social development from below.”[1] The Nobel committee asserted that microfinance is “an important liberating force and an ever more important instrument in the struggle against poverty.”[2] Since then, a global microfinance revolution has emerged and the Grameen Bank has been at the vanguard of this movement, showing the potential to alleviate poverty by ...


Federal Policy And The Rise In Disability Enrollment: Evidence For The Veterans Affairs’ Disability Compensation Program, Mark Duggan May 2010

Federal Policy And The Rise In Disability Enrollment: Evidence For The Veterans Affairs’ Disability Compensation Program, Mark Duggan

Health Care Management Papers

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs compensates 13 percent of the nation’s military veterans for service‐related disabilities through the Disability Compensation (DC) program. In 2001, a legislative change made it easier for Vietnam veterans to receive benefits for diabetes associated with military service. In this paper, we investigate this policy’s effect on DC enrollment and expenditures as well as the behavioral response of potential beneficiaries. Our findings demonstrate that the policy increased DC enrollment by 6 percentage points among Vietnam veterans and that an additional 1.7 percent experienced an increase in their DC benefits, which ...