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Full-Text Articles in Mass Communication

Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala May 2019

Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala

Honors Scholar Theses

Public interest in history is alarmingly low, and this thesis aims to help reverse that trend by recommending the adoption of YouTube as history’s community tool. The majority of this thesis assesses YouTube’s merits as a suitable platform for enthusiasts and professionals alike to share their interests and thereby grow the public’s interest in history. This paper also includes other authors' sentiments on digital history and incorporates it into the argument.


Positive Media: An Introductory Exploration, Meghan B. Keener Aug 2012

Positive Media: An Introductory Exploration, Meghan B. Keener

Master of Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) Capstone Projects

Media has become an increasingly large part of our lives, and therefore plays a crucial role in our well-being. Positive psychology, the science of well-being, can be complemented through the new potentialities of media, which in many ways also seeks to improve the human experience. I create the context for a new dialogue about what "positive media" might be. By adopting a positive lens and discussing exemplars in different formats, this paper explores the ways media effectively incorporates elements of well-being. Through this positive approach, we gain an appreciation for what media does well. The paper also recommends ways that ...


Are They For Real? Activism And Ironic Identities, Amber Day Jan 2008

Are They For Real? Activism And Ironic Identities, Amber Day

English and Cultural Studies Journal Articles

A new breed of political activist has begun to appear on the streets and in the news. They are no longer trying to out-shout their opponents, but are agreeing with them instead, enthusiastically taking their adversary’s position to exaggerated extremes. It is a practice here termed “identity-nabbing,” in which participants pretend to be someone they are not, appearing in public as exaggerated caricatures of their opponents or ambiguously co-opting some of their power. This paper focuses on three groups in particular: The Billionaires for Bush, Reverend Billy, and the Yes Men. Each group stages elaborate, ironically humorous stunts as ...