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Full-Text Articles in Mass Communication

Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala May 2019

Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala

Honors Scholar Theses

Public interest in history is alarmingly low, and this thesis aims to help reverse that trend by recommending the adoption of YouTube as history’s community tool. The majority of this thesis assesses YouTube’s merits as a suitable platform for enthusiasts and professionals alike to share their interests and thereby grow the public’s interest in history. This paper also includes other authors' sentiments on digital history and incorporates it into the argument.


Attempting An Affirmative Approach To American Broadcasting: Ideology, Politics, And The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program, Michael W. Huntsberger Jan 2014

Attempting An Affirmative Approach To American Broadcasting: Ideology, Politics, And The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program, Michael W. Huntsberger

Faculty Publications

The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (PTFP) was the largest source of capital funding for U.S. public broadcasters for nearly fifty years. Between 1963 and 2010, the PTFP distributed more than $800 million to support the construction of public broadcasting facilities. Though the PTFP itself was generally noncontroversial, the fortunes of the program were complicated by the partisan politics of public broadcasting and federal fiscal policy. This study provides evidence of the ambiguous and contingent nature of the American approach to public broadcasting, and demonstrates some of the problems associated with affirmative efforts by government to advance public communication.


Book Review: Alphabet To Internet: Media In Our Lives, Sue Burzynski Bullard Jan 2013

Book Review: Alphabet To Internet: Media In Our Lives, Sue Burzynski Bullard

Faculty Publications, College of Journalism & Mass Communications

Technology has changed virtually every aspect of communication. As more of us adapt to news and information delivered almost instantly on devices that handily fit into a pocket, we’ve become accustomed to new tools and quick changes. Irving Fang’s second edition of Alphabet to Internet puts it all in perspective, starting with the dawn of writing and including today’s 140-character Tweet. In a word, the impact is mind-boggling.


U.S. Radio In The 21st Century: Staying The Course In Unknown Territory, Michael Huntsberger Jan 2012

U.S. Radio In The 21st Century: Staying The Course In Unknown Territory, Michael Huntsberger

Faculty Publications

This essay examines the development of the radio industry in the United States as it makes its way into the 21st century. Issues of regulation, technology, commerce, and culture are addressed.


Ua68/8/1 Potter College Of Arts & Letters History Publications, Wku Archives Dec 2010

Ua68/8/1 Potter College Of Arts & Letters History Publications, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Collection Inventories

Publications created by and about the History Department.


In Defense Of Romantic Fiction, Ann Margolis May 2009

In Defense Of Romantic Fiction, Ann Margolis

Master of Science in Publishing

The focus of this defense is the publishing industry's and literary critics' treatment of the Romance genre, despite the monumental sales figures they bring in each year. Although the Romance is considered the black sheep of the industry, its revenues bring in the financial support that provides publishers the ability to pursue what is considered more worthy endeavors. The paper delves into the history of the genre, along with its themes, marketing plans, sales, and the community of Romance readers.


Televising 9/11 And Its Aftermath: The Framing Of George W. Bush’S Faith-Based Politics Of Good And Evil, Gary Edgerton Jan 2007

Televising 9/11 And Its Aftermath: The Framing Of George W. Bush’S Faith-Based Politics Of Good And Evil, Gary Edgerton

Scholarship and Professional Work - Communication

For most of the four days following 9/11, TV viewers around the world were mesmerised by unthinkable images. Television brought home to Americans especially the polarising effects of the post-Cold War world, including the backlash of Islamic fundamentalism and the imminent threat of future terrorist attacks. A formulaic narrative quickly emerged; ordinary police and firefighters took the lead as America’s national heroes, while Osama bin Laden and the rest of al-Qaeda and the Taliban rose up as villains. On September 12, 2001, U.S. President George W. Bush gave voice to this mythic small-screen storyline as “a monumental ...


Chalk, Talk, And Videotape: Utilizing Ken Burns’S Television Histories In The Classroom, Gary Edgerton Jan 2002

Chalk, Talk, And Videotape: Utilizing Ken Burns’S Television Histories In The Classroom, Gary Edgerton

Scholarship and Professional Work - Communication

Gary Edgerton's contribution to OAH Magazine of History (Summer 2002) 16 (4): 16-22.