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Communication Faculty Publications

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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Mass Communication

Print Versus Digital: How Medium Matters On 'House Of Cards', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter Jan 2017

Print Versus Digital: How Medium Matters On 'House Of Cards', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter

Communication Faculty Publications

This study utilizes textual analysis to analyze how journalists are depicted on the Netflix drama House of Cards. Through the lens of orientalism and cultivation, researchers examine how depictions of print and digital journalism would lead viewers to see digital journalists as less ethical and driven by self-gain, while also viewing technology as an impediment to quality journalism. These findings are then discussed as a means for understanding how these depictions could affect society.


All In The Game: Communitarianism And 'The Wire', Chad Painter Aug 2016

All In The Game: Communitarianism And 'The Wire', Chad Painter

Communication Faculty Publications

Communitarian ethicists argue that social identity is formed by community relationships, emphasizing the connection between an individual and his or her community. News organizations are part of that community. Indeed, journalism only functions properly in terms of the public and public life, and as part of a larger community. This textual analysis study focused on the breakdown of the fictional Baltimore community depicted in the television series The Wire. Five institutions—the police force and justice system, the labor force, local and state politicians and government, the educational system, and the daily newspaper—have failed, and, in turn, the city ...


Market Matters: How Market-Driven Is 'The Newsroom'?, Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter Feb 2016

Market Matters: How Market-Driven Is 'The Newsroom'?, Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter

Communication Faculty Publications

This study examines whether the award-winning news show The Newsroom depicted on HBO practices what John McManus defined as market-driven journalism. McManus posited that organizations practicing market-driven journalism compete in the four markets he describes in his market theory for news production. This study found that The Newsroom depicts an organization that does indeed practice market-driven journalism, with results interpreted through the lens of market theory for news production.


Alternative Media And Normative Theory: A Case Of Ferguson, Missouri, Mark Anthony Poepsel, Chad Painter Jan 2016

Alternative Media And Normative Theory: A Case Of Ferguson, Missouri, Mark Anthony Poepsel, Chad Painter

Communication Faculty Publications

This paper, based on in-depth interviews with journalists at alternative and advocacy papers in St. Louis as well as interviews with live streaming protestors, a new breed of citizen journalist, applies six characteristics commonly associated with the alternative press to coverage of the protests and police crackdown in Ferguson, Missouri, between August 9, 2014, and March 2015.

Journalists from the alternative newspaper in St. Louis focused on progressive or radical values less than the literature predicted. The African-American newspaper in St. Louis found itself influencing the national and global agenda regarding Ferguson and the ongoing oppression of blacks in the ...


Gender Games: The Portrayal Of Female Journalists On 'House Of Cards', Chad Painter, Patrick Ferrucci Jan 2016

Gender Games: The Portrayal Of Female Journalists On 'House Of Cards', Chad Painter, Patrick Ferrucci

Communication Faculty Publications

This textual analysis focuses on the portrayal of female journalists in House of Cards. The uneven depictions of six female journalists could have a socializing effect on the audience. The researchers argue that the character Zoe Barnes is depicted as childlike, unprofessional, and unethical, while the character Ayla Sayyad is portrayed as a dedicated watchdog journalist. The researchers then explore the ethical implications of these portrayals through the lens of social responsibility theory.


Pseudo Newsgathering: Analyzing Journalists’ Use Of Pseudo-Events On 'The Wire', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter Oct 2013

Pseudo Newsgathering: Analyzing Journalists’ Use Of Pseudo-Events On 'The Wire', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter

Communication Faculty Publications

This textual analysis examines the role of pseudo-events in the newsgathering process depicted on season five of The Wire. The researchers found that the press and sources construct “reality”; sources present “masks” to conceal “reality”' and journalists acknowledge the absurdity of pseudo-events but cover staged events as genuine news. The overriding conclusion is that journalists fail citizens by constructing a false reality through a negotiation with powerful sources who are media- savvy enough to control depictions. These findings are then interpreted through the lens of cultivation theory.


Testing News Trustworthiness In An Online Public Sphere: A Case Study Of The Economist's News Report Covering The Riots In Xinjiang, China, Dexin Tian, Chin-Chung Chao Sep 2012

Testing News Trustworthiness In An Online Public Sphere: A Case Study Of The Economist's News Report Covering The Riots In Xinjiang, China, Dexin Tian, Chin-Chung Chao

Communication Faculty Publications

This paper explores the news trustworthiness and media credibility of The Economist’s news report on 9 July 2009, and the communicative roles of 846 readers’ responses. Theoretically guided by news translation and cultural resistance and the online public sphere, we applied online field observation and discourse analysis and achieved two main findings: First, although the news report covered the Xinjiang riots with comprehensive and attractive details, it violated the core journalism value of media credibility and journalistic objectivity by providing misleading pictures and significant unreliable and biased coverage. Second, the major communicative roles of the online readers’ responses generally ...


This Little Piggy Went To Press: The American News Media's Construction Of Animals In Agriculture, Carrie Packwood Freeman Jan 2009

This Little Piggy Went To Press: The American News Media's Construction Of Animals In Agriculture, Carrie Packwood Freeman

Communication Faculty Publications

This textual analysis examines the representations of farmed animals in national print and broadcast news discourse in over 100 stories published from 2000-2003. Findings show these American news media largely support the speciesist status quo by favoring elite viewpoints and failing to provide balance. Although exceptions are provided, news media often objectify nonhuman animals discursively through: 1) commodification, 2) failure to acknowledge their emotional perspectives, and 3) failure to describe them as inherently-valuable individuals.


His Final Homily: Pope John Paul Ii's Death As An Affirmation Of His Life's Message, Joesph M. Valenzano Jan 2009

His Final Homily: Pope John Paul Ii's Death As An Affirmation Of His Life's Message, Joesph M. Valenzano

Communication Faculty Publications

Every Sunday morning, a member of the Roman Catholic clergy addresses his flock after a reading from one of the Gospels. These homilies ordinarily last between 10 and 20 minutes and allow the priest an opportunity to interpret the Gospel message from that day's reading, as well as discuss how that message relates to contemporary events and issues.

During the final two months of his life, Pope John Paul II provided a longer, more powerful symbolic homily to the world. The message summarized his positions on freedom, suffering, and the dignity of human life.


Editors’ Note: The Need For Media And Information Literacy In Graduate Education, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Feb 2007

Editors’ Note: The Need For Media And Information Literacy In Graduate Education, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

Media and information literacy perspectives could offer new justification for the expansion of graduate program offerings in a variety of fields. The interdisciplinary field of media and information literacy continues to discover new paths of research. For example, visual literacy, computer advertisements, critical deconstruction of media, distance education, convergence, video games and music videos were some of the topics explored in 2006.


Are Anti-Spit Tobacco Campaigns Striking Out? A Survey Of Iowa And Nebraska College Baseball Players, David C. Ogden, Teresa A. Lamsam, Hugh J. Reilly, Michael L. Hilt Oct 2006

Are Anti-Spit Tobacco Campaigns Striking Out? A Survey Of Iowa And Nebraska College Baseball Players, David C. Ogden, Teresa A. Lamsam, Hugh J. Reilly, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

Anti-spit tobacco information is replete with fear appeals, including firsthand accounts of death and debilitation, to make users aware of the health risks and dangers. Those dangers, however, are well known by baseball players whose association with spit tobacco is historic. A survey of 217 Iowa and Nebraska college players showed that despite their awareness of spit tobacco's dangers, the players use spit tobacco to relax and focus on the field. This study supports other research showing that fear appeals may not be the most appropriate approach for anti-tobacco advertising campaigns. The study suggests that campaigns should promote relaxation ...


Editors’ Note: Simile Progress Report, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Feb 2006

Editors’ Note: Simile Progress Report, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

As Studies in Media & Information Literacy Education (SIMILE) enters its sixth year of publication, the coeditors have identified a number of issues to be addressed in the journal’s development. This editors’ note explores how the field of media and information literacy education has grown in importance. There continues to be a need for both theory-building and empirical research data, which would strengthen conceptualization. SIMILE needs to cultivate a global sense of significance about media and information literacy education issues across many disciplines.


Media & Information Literacy Theory And Research: Thoughts From The Co-Editors, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Feb 2005

Media & Information Literacy Theory And Research: Thoughts From The Co-Editors, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

An overview of the conceptualization of media studies and information literacy education reveals the importance of analyzing text and visual communication. Beyond simply offering an explanation of mass communication and all of its parts, media and information literacy as an emerging field of study must begin to address the complex interaction between literacy and new media forms. The new co-editors of SIMILE encourage interdisciplinary scholarship, which illuminates new avenues in media and information literacy education.


Race And Local Television News Crime Coverage, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Nov 2003

Race And Local Television News Crime Coverage, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

Viewers of local television newscasts across the United States are regularly exposed to crime news stories. Crime coverage by local television stations is studied with an interest in how live reporting, dramatic video, and timeliness influence perceptions of race in the United States. Crime coverage did not always identify the race of a suspect because that information often was not available from police. However, when violent criminals or suspects were identified, race normally was shown through a mug shot, photograph, or video from the scene. When an African-American suspect was shown in police custody, the images tended to reinforce existing ...


Election 2000: Aarp Portrayals Of Presidential Candidates And Issues, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Nov 2002

Election 2000: Aarp Portrayals Of Presidential Candidates And Issues, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

The 2000 United States presidential election was one of the closest in history, and issues of importance to older Americans such as Social Security, prescription drugs, and taxes were front and center in the national debate. This article examines how AARP, formerly the American Association of Retired Persons, portrayed the candidates and issues through its two publications: AARP Bulletin and Modern Maturity.

The 2000 United States presidential election was one of the closest in history (Kranish & Johnson, 2000). Additionally, throughout the summer and fall of 2000, poll data suggested a split electorate (Whitman, 2000). Issues of importance to older Americans ...


Mass Media And The Death Penalty: Social Construction Of Three Nebraska Executions, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt Apr 1999

Mass Media And The Death Penalty: Social Construction Of Three Nebraska Executions, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

This research analyzes local TV news coverage of three Nebraska executions in the 1990s, the first in the state since 1959. The three Nebraska executions allow us to see mass media coverage of the death penalty from four perspectives: 1) media organization routines, journalistic beliefs, and how source selection affected the content; 2) justice was portrayed through a consonant set of social symbols; 3) the public support for the death penalty in this country may have led journalists to avoid tough questioning of public officials; 4) the resulting coverage was a social construction of reality that might influence future public ...


Book Review: The Invisible Medium, Michael L. Hilt Jan 1997

Book Review: The Invisible Medium, Michael L. Hilt

Communication Faculty Publications

Peter M. Lewis and Jerry Booth. The Invisible Medium. Washington, DC: Howard University Press, 1990.

The critical theme presented by the authors of this book is that radio has become an "invisible medium." They blame this condition on its subordination to television in public policy debate, and because of the infrequent attention it receives through critical and scholarly studies. They examine the two predominant models of radio—public service and commercial—and survey alternative radio practice in both Western and Third World countries. Throughout the book, they stress the underestimated potential of radio as a contemporary mass communication instrument and ...


Broadcast News And Elderly People: Attitudes Of Local Television Managers, Michael L. Hilt, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz Oct 1996

Broadcast News And Elderly People: Attitudes Of Local Television Managers, Michael L. Hilt, Jeremy Harris Lipschultz

Communication Faculty Publications

The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People Scale was used to measure local television manager attitudes toward elderly people. Census projections have shown that the elderly population will increase dramatically in the next century. The importance of local television news in the lives of the elderly makes the study of two groups of television managers - general managers and news directors 0 found that younger news directors have a more positive attitude toward older people, while the older general managers had a less positive attitude.