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Virginia Commonwealth University

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Full-Text Articles in Mass Communication

In Media Res, Christopher Andrew Sisk Jan 2018

In Media Res, Christopher Andrew Sisk

Theses and Dissertations

We are inundated by a constant feed of media that responds and adapts in real time to the impulses of our psyches and the dimensions of our devices. Beneath the surface, this stream of information is directed by hidden, automated controls and steered by political agendas. The transmission of information has evolved into a spiral of entropy, and the boundaries between author, content, platform, and receiver have blurred. This reductive space of responsive media is a catalyst for immense political and cultural change, causing us to question our notions of authority, truth, and reality.


Consuming Digital Debris In The Plasticene, Stephen R. Parks Jan 2018

Consuming Digital Debris In The Plasticene, Stephen R. Parks

Theses and Dissertations

Claims of customization and control by socio-technical industries are altering the role of consumer and producer. These narratives are often misleading attempts to engage consumers with new forms of technology. By addressing capitalist intent, material, and the reproduction limits of 3-D printed objects’, I observe the aspirational promise of becoming a producer of my own belongings through new networks of production. I am interested in gaining a better understanding of the data consumed that perpetuates hyper-consumptive tendencies for new technological apparatuses. My role as a designer focuses on the resolution of not only the surface of the object through 3-D ...


Submission Or Subversion: Women With Shaved Hair In Media, Thea Cheuk Jan 2018

Submission Or Subversion: Women With Shaved Hair In Media, Thea Cheuk

Auctus: The Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Scholarship

“It is quite obvious that the shaving of heads fundamentally damages the physical and moral integrity of those people for whom it was intended,” Fabrice Virgili asserts in his book Shorn Women: Gender and Punishment in Liberation France (135). For centuries, hair has been held as a standard of feminine beauty, therefore a lack of it has a long and storied history as well. Records of head shaving as a form of punishment for women can be traced back to Ancient Greek and Roman times. Shaving a woman’s head was a sign of sin and shame, and stripped them ...


Framing And Visual Type: Effect On Future Zika Vaccine Uptake Intent, Jeanine P.D. Guidry, Kellie E. Carlyle, Jessica G. Larose, Paul Perrin, Mark Ryan, Marcus Messner, Jay Adams Jan 2018

Framing And Visual Type: Effect On Future Zika Vaccine Uptake Intent, Jeanine P.D. Guidry, Kellie E. Carlyle, Jessica G. Larose, Paul Perrin, Mark Ryan, Marcus Messner, Jay Adams

Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture Publications

Introduction: The Zika virus is associated with the birth defect microcephaly, and while a vaccine was not available in early- 2017, several were under development. This study’s purpose was to identify effective communication strategies to promote uptake of a new vaccine, particularly among women of reproductive age.

Design and methods: In order to study the effects of Zika message framing (gain vs. loss) and visual type (photo vs. infographic) on future Zika vaccine uptake intent, a 2×2 between-subjects experiment was performed via an online survey in 2017 among 339 U.S. women of reproductive age (18-49 years). Participants ...


The Scope, The Scope Jan 2017

The Scope, The Scope

The Scope

Collection of all 2016 articles from The Scope.

About The Scope

This magazine was produced by students in Science Journalism (MASC 491-005), which was taught during the Fall 2016 semester by Jeff South, an associate professor in the Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Sara Williams, head of academic outreach for VCU Libraries.

The course, VCU’s first focusing exclusively on science reporting, was supported by a grant that funds projects aligned with VCU’s strategic plan, called Quest for Distinction. VCU selected the Science Journalism course as a “disruptively innovative idea” and as a ...


Researchers Head South To Study Mangroves And Birds, Joe Johnson Jan 2016

Researchers Head South To Study Mangroves And Birds, Joe Johnson

The Scope

For two weeks in January, VCU researchers Cathy Viverette and Edward Crawford will accompany 18 students to Panama, where they will study mangrove conservation and avian field ecology.


A Wonder Drug Against Cancer, Hiv And Other Diseases?, Ryan Carstons Jan 2016

A Wonder Drug Against Cancer, Hiv And Other Diseases?, Ryan Carstons

The Scope

VCU researchers are experimenting with a new drug that targets the chaperone proteins that protect cancer cells. The drug AR-12 has the potential to fight off not only cancer but also Ebola, Zika and the human immunodeficiency virus, as well as bacterial infections.


Glove’S A Perfect Fit For Patients With Raynaud’S Disease, Riley Murtagh Jan 2016

Glove’S A Perfect Fit For Patients With Raynaud’S Disease, Riley Murtagh

The Scope

For a senior project, VCU engineering student Jessica Bishop wanted to help people like herself who suffer from Raynaud’s disease, which constricts blood flow in fingers and other extremities exposed to cold environments or stress. So she invented a pair of “magic gloves” that regulate hand temperature in cold environments.


Study May Reform Police Training Methods, Joe Johnson Jan 2016

Study May Reform Police Training Methods, Joe Johnson

The Scope

A VCU doctoral candidate has designed a study that could help improve training of police officers in their interactions with citizens. The study by Shana Mell seeks to show how body worn cameras can be used for observation and subsequent training.


How Do Police Brutality Videos Affect Us?, Joseph Forcier Jan 2016

How Do Police Brutality Videos Affect Us?, Joseph Forcier

The Scope

Videos of encounters between police and citizens can be used to hold police accountable or determine whether officers’ actions were justified. But those videos and related comments on social media could cause viewers to experience stress and other emotions, says a researcher at VCU’s Robertson School of Media and Culture.


Various Tests Induce, Then Measure, Stress, Malik Hall Jan 2016

Various Tests Induce, Then Measure, Stress, Malik Hall

The Scope

We all experience stress in some shape or form, especially university students facing final exams and graduating seniors under pressure to find a job. Now these nerve-wracking situations are being replicated in a lab – but this isn’t as sadistic as it may sound.


A Fluffy Friend Can Chase Stress Away, Jessica Mayfield Jan 2016

A Fluffy Friend Can Chase Stress Away, Jessica Mayfield

The Scope

With final exams looming, VCU students could play with friendly dogs at “Paws for Stress” events held by the Center for Human-Animal Interaction and University Counseling services. CHAI is studying whether interacting with therapy dogs really can lower your stress levels.


Perseverance Pays Off For Ph.D. Student, Jacob Jaminet Jan 2016

Perseverance Pays Off For Ph.D. Student, Jacob Jaminet

The Scope

Lauren Griggs, a Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering, is working to increase the number of women and minorities entering the STEM disciplines – science, technology, engineering and mathematics. She was recently awarded VCU’s Susan E. Kennedy Award, which recognizes graduate students who are advancing the presence of women in education.


Professor Studies Invasive Species In Africa, Nicole Nelson Jan 2016

Professor Studies Invasive Species In Africa, Nicole Nelson

The Scope

James Vonesh, an associate professor of biology at VCU, recently returned from South Africa, where he focused on an invasive species of frog. His research question: Why do certain species flourish in a new environment while others do not?


Method May Revolutionize Athletic Training, Shawn Scornaienchi Jan 2016

Method May Revolutionize Athletic Training, Shawn Scornaienchi

The Scope

Speed is the key to success in track, football and most other sports. Researchers at VCU have found that speed is crucial to success in weight room training as well. They are advocating a new method called velocity-based training, which measures how fast an athlete can lift weights.


Why Can’T They All Be Best In Class?, Malik Hall Jan 2016

Why Can’T They All Be Best In Class?, Malik Hall

The Scope

Researchers at VCU and the University of Florida are developing positive-reinforcement intervention techniques to address problem behavior that may be more prevalent among schoolchildren from low-income homes. The research has an appropriate name: Best in Class.


International Health Workers Spend Year At Vcu, Vanessa Gleiser Jan 2016

International Health Workers Spend Year At Vcu, Vanessa Gleiser

The Scope

Samuel Hanu, a psychiatric nurse from Ghana, is among a dozen health professionals from throughout the world spending the year at VCU as part of the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program. He is researching how the United States treats substance abuse and mental illness.


E-Cigarettes May Be A Clue At Crime Scenes, Jessica Mayfield Jan 2016

E-Cigarettes May Be A Clue At Crime Scenes, Jessica Mayfield

The Scope

You’ve probably seen the show “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” and spinoffs like “CSI: Miami.” VCU researchers could provide the inspiration for a new drama: “CSI: Vaping” – about how e-cigarettes could be critical clues in solving crimes.


Demanding Class Spurs Student To Stanford, Jacob Jaminet Jan 2016

Demanding Class Spurs Student To Stanford, Jacob Jaminet

The Scope

Hearing that Nick Rodriguez goes to Stanford, you probably wouldn’t guess that he had dropped out of high school and didn’t get the best grades as an undergrad at VCU. Rodriguez graduated from VCU last spring with a degree in bioinformatics. He is pursuing a Ph.D. in biomedical informatics at Stanford University. He says his interest in biomedical research stemmed from the VCU course Molecular Biology Through Discovery.


Commercial Drone Research Takes Off At Vcu, Joe Forcier Jan 2016

Commercial Drone Research Takes Off At Vcu, Joe Forcier

The Scope

As microprocessors and mounted cameras have become smaller, unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly known as drones, have skyrocketed in popularity. But UAVs aren’t just child’s play. Researchers at VCU say the devices could be used in a range of beneficial ways, from inspecting bridges and searching for lost hikers to shooting documentaries and surveying land.


Many College Students Abuse Alcohol And Adderall, Vanessa Gleiser Jan 2016

Many College Students Abuse Alcohol And Adderall, Vanessa Gleiser

The Scope

VCU Counseling Services has seen the gamut of substance abuse problems experienced by college students. “Alcohol is the most abused substance,” says Kristen Kidd Donovan, one of the counselors. Some students also abuse Adderall, which can have serious health consequences.


Rice Center Focuses On Restoring Wetlands, Chris Rubis Jan 2016

Rice Center Focuses On Restoring Wetlands, Chris Rubis

The Scope

Halfway between Richmond and Williamsburg, where Kimages Creek flows into the James River, lies the Inger and Walter Rice Center for Environmental Life Sciences. A restoration project aims to return the area to its original state as a wetland. The project began by removing a dam that had been blocking the flow of Kimages Creek since 1927.


Project Tracks Veterans’ Brain Injuries, Riley Murtagh Jan 2016

Project Tracks Veterans’ Brain Injuries, Riley Murtagh

The Scope

About 20 percent of veterans who fought in the Iraq War sustained concussions. Of soldiers who received head trauma, about 8 percent continue to have symptoms, says Dr. David Cifu, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the VCU School of Medicine. “We need to understand how they’re going to do in terms of those symptoms.”


Songbird’S Winter Grounds Face Environmental Threats, Kirby Farineau Jan 2016

Songbird’S Winter Grounds Face Environmental Threats, Kirby Farineau

The Scope

VCU graduate biology student Jessica Reese has documented the environmental threats facing the prothonotary warbler. Development has depleted the mangrove forests of Panama and Colombia where these gray and yellow songbirds spend the winter months.


Reimagining Your Rx, Rebecca Jones Jan 2016

Reimagining Your Rx, Rebecca Jones

The Scope

Your future prescriptions might be manufactured in a portable factory – or even be produced by your body itself. Dr. Thomas Roper, director of pharmaceutical engineering in VCU’s Department of Chemical & Life Science Engineering, says the goal is to shrink the environmental and industrial footprint of the drug manufacturing process while expanding global access to medicines.


Vaginal Probiotic May Help In Pregnancy, Ryan Carstons Jan 2016

Vaginal Probiotic May Help In Pregnancy, Ryan Carstons

The Scope

Consuming probiotics is a healthy fad that nutritionists and doctors are encouraging; eat enough, and your digestion will improve. However, millions of “good” bacteria live in us and perform healthy functions. Women, for example, have probiotics that originate in the vaginal canal. One particular kind of bacteria there may provide benefits during pregnancy.


An Advocate For Minorities In Science, Paige Bellamy Jan 2016

An Advocate For Minorities In Science, Paige Bellamy

The Scope

Dr. Teshell Greene, who grew up on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts, moved to New York at 14 to pursue her dream of being a science researcher. Today she is an instructor in the VCU Department of Biology and a staunch advocate for underrepresented minorities in the field.


Pine Trees May Shed Light On Global Warming, Nicole Nelson Jan 2016

Pine Trees May Shed Light On Global Warming, Nicole Nelson

The Scope

VCU graduate student Constance Bolte has been conducting research at “the intersection of ecology and evolution,” focusing on three species of pine trees: the loblolly, the pitch pine and the table mountain pine. Using temperature and precipitation data, Bolte has been forecasting and “hindcasting” the species’ distribution across North America.


Exploring Links Between Diabetes And Depression, Kirby Farineau Jan 2016

Exploring Links Between Diabetes And Depression, Kirby Farineau

The Scope

Some people may think mental health and physical health are completely unrelated, but in fact, they are closely linked, says Dr. Briana Mezuk, a researcher and professor at VCU. She recently received a grant from the C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research at VCU to study the relationship between diabetes and depression.


Researcher Studies Nervous System Development, Paige Bellamy Jan 2016

Researcher Studies Nervous System Development, Paige Bellamy

The Scope

Ashley Purdy, who recently finished a master’s degree in biology at VCU and is now pursuing her Ph.D., is studying nerve cells in zebrafish in hopes of unlocking secrets about the human nervous system. The research could shed light on how neurodevelopmental disorders like multiple sclerosis or epilepsy occur.