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Full-Text Articles in Interpersonal and Small Group Communication

A Sociolinguistic Analysis Of Face-Threat And Face-Management In Potential Complaint Situations, Laura Hartley Jan 1998

A Sociolinguistic Analysis Of Face-Threat And Face-Management In Potential Complaint Situations, Laura Hartley

Faculty Publications - Department of World Languages, Sociology & Cultural Studies

Within the pragmatics literature, a number of studies have investigated the speech act of complaining. In most cases, the researchers have failed to define a "complaint" before proceeding with analysis. The purpose of this study is to provide a theoretical definition of a "complaint" and to examine in-depth the linguistic details of the speech act of complaining, with a particular view to illuminating the linguistic devices employed in managing the "face" of the participants involved in Potential Complaint Situations. In addition to dealing with micro-level questions regarding how complaints are realized in various circumstances, this study also sheds light on ...


Editorial Policy Jan 1998

Editorial Policy

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Front Cover Jan 1998

Front Cover

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Delineating The Uses Of Practical Theory: A Reply To Hickson, Shawn Spano Jan 1998

Delineating The Uses Of Practical Theory: A Reply To Hickson, Shawn Spano

Basic Communication Course Annual

Let me begin by thanking Professor Hickson for his comments on the article I published in the 1996 issue of the Basic Communication Course Annual (Hickson, 1996; Spano, 1996). I consider it a compliment that my ideas about practical theory interested him enough to write a rejoinder. More importantly, Hickson’s response provides us with an opportunity to “continue the conversation” on the role of theory in the basic course. It might be useful here to provide some background on how this conversation started.

In 1995 I presented a paper on practical theory on a SCA program sponsored by the ...


Commentary: The Research Foundation For Instruction In The Beginning Public Speaking Course, Lawrence W. Hugenberg, Barbara S. Moyer Jan 1998

Commentary: The Research Foundation For Instruction In The Beginning Public Speaking Course, Lawrence W. Hugenberg, Barbara S. Moyer

Basic Communication Course Annual

The history of public speaking instruction is rooted in classical rhetorical theories. There is a lack of recent communication research findings cited in textbooks to support instruction in the beginning public speaking course. This research examined five leading public speaking texts in the hopes of finding contemporary communication research findings to support the advice given to students. This survey reveals little research being cited in beginning public speaking texts. The authors conclude with a discussion of reasons why research is not cited and offer communication scholars a challenge to conduct research to support pedagogical claims.


Basic Communication Course Annual Vol. 10 Jan 1998

Basic Communication Course Annual Vol. 10

Basic Communication Course Annual

Full issue (174 pages, 6.4 MB)


Title Page Jan 1998

Title Page

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Editorial Board Jan 1998

Editorial Board

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Contents Jan 1998

Contents

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Predictors Of Self-Perceptions Of Behavioral Competence, Self-Esteem, And Willingness To Communicate: A Study Assessing Impact In A Basic Interpersonal Communication Course, Sherwyn P. Morreale, Michael Z. Hackman, Michael R. Neer Jan 1998

Predictors Of Self-Perceptions Of Behavioral Competence, Self-Esteem, And Willingness To Communicate: A Study Assessing Impact In A Basic Interpersonal Communication Course, Sherwyn P. Morreale, Michael Z. Hackman, Michael R. Neer

Basic Communication Course Annual

Considering the emergent role of evaluation in higher education, it is important that assessment procedures be developed for all communication courses. Courses such as public speaking already have well established assessment programs while other courses are in need of additional attention. This article describes an assessment program that examines the impact of an interpersonal course on undergraduates' self-perceived behavioral and affective competence. Using a pre- and post-test model, assessment was based on administration of the Communication Behaviors Inventory, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Willingness to Communicate Scale. These outcomes were measured as a function of gender, age, and ethnicity ...


The Basic Course And The Future Of The Workplace, Andrew D. Wolvin Jan 1998

The Basic Course And The Future Of The Workplace, Andrew D. Wolvin

Basic Communication Course Annual

The preparation of students to function as effective communicators in the workplace is an important goal of the basic communication course. To meet this goal, students must be equipped with speaking and listening competencies in order to do their work. The basic hybrid course with units in intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and public communication offers a viable framework for workplace communication.


Graduate Teaching Assistant Training: Preparing Instructors To Assist Esl Students In The Introductory Public Speaking Course, Brooke L. Quigley, Katherine G. Hendrix, Karen Freisem Jan 1998

Graduate Teaching Assistant Training: Preparing Instructors To Assist Esl Students In The Introductory Public Speaking Course, Brooke L. Quigley, Katherine G. Hendrix, Karen Freisem

Basic Communication Course Annual

Much research identifies the need to assist English as a Second Language (ESL) students in our classrooms. Some communication educators have addressed this need by enrolling students in special sections of introductory courses for ESL students only. With a focus specifically on graduate teaching assistant (GTA) training, this paper suggests ways to assist ESL students, along with native speaking students, enrolled in regular sections of the introductory public speaking course. We first identify steps for assessing whether an ESL student is appropriately enrolled in a course. We then focus on ways instructors can assist ESL students with: 1) pronunciation, comprehensibility ...


Learning Style Preferences And Academic Achievement Within The Basic Communication Course, Charles A. Lubbers, William J. Seiler Jan 1998

Learning Style Preferences And Academic Achievement Within The Basic Communication Course, Charles A. Lubbers, William J. Seiler

Basic Communication Course Annual

Students enrolled in a basic communication course taught using the personalized system of instruction (PSI) were studied to determine the influence of learning style preferences on academic achievement. The twenty measures of the Canfield Learning Style Inventory (CLSI) were regressed with three measures of student academic achievement. Eight of the twenty were significant in at least one of the three equations. Two of the learning style measures (class organization and performance expectations) were significant with all three measures of achievement. Two applications of the findings for basic course instructors are presented.


The Debate On The Uses Of Practical Theory Continues, Lawrence W. Hugenberg Jan 1998

The Debate On The Uses Of Practical Theory Continues, Lawrence W. Hugenberg

Basic Communication Course Annual

The first two essays by Spano and Hickson (Basic Communication Course Annual 8, 1996) involved some crucial issues about where the basic communication course stands in relation to theory, research, and practice. In this second round, specific examples are discussed by Spano. Hickson attempts to contextualize them. Such specificity involves delineating the nature of communication theory from a pragmatic perspective, not ideological from either a phenomenological not a positivistic stance. The importance of context is stressed and outlined as an aspect of human nature—perhaps the element which separates us from other living beings.


Applying Multiple Intelligences Theory To The Basic Public Speaking Course, Kristi A. Schaller, Marybeth G. Callison Jan 1998

Applying Multiple Intelligences Theory To The Basic Public Speaking Course, Kristi A. Schaller, Marybeth G. Callison

Basic Communication Course Annual

This article examines the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) (Gardner, 1983; 1993) as it applies to the basic public speaking course. According to MI theory, intelligence is not a single dimension but is a composite of several aptitudes and talents. Gardner believes that individuals possess more than one intelligence, and MI theory defines seven. We argue that the basic public speaking course is an excellent forum for addressing students’ multiple intelligences while teaching oral and written communication skills. This paper introduces MI theory and provides suggested course assignments and activities that correspond with the multiple intelligences.


Teaching The Honors Public Speaking Course, Karla Kay Jensen, David E. Williams Jan 1998

Teaching The Honors Public Speaking Course, Karla Kay Jensen, David E. Williams

Basic Communication Course Annual

The honors student comes to the public speaking class with a unique set of needs and learning preferences which require alterations to the traditional course. This article explores a variety of honors course formats, honors students’ characteristics and learning preferences, and some ideas for restructuring the typical public speaking course to best accommodate honors students. As such, this article can serve as an initial step toward creating a new honors course or restructuring an existing course. The suggested formats and content changes can create added challenge and participatory experience to improve honors education.


Theory And Pedagogy In The Basic Course: A Summary From Spano And Hickson, Mark Hickson Iii Jan 1998

Theory And Pedagogy In The Basic Course: A Summary From Spano And Hickson, Mark Hickson Iii

Basic Communication Course Annual

I, too, have been pleased about the exchange of insights relative to the practical approach to teaching the basic course, as suggested by Spano (1996). While I agree with much of what Spano wrote, I am still concerned about the nature and status of some of the “theory” that has been developed and that is being developed in the discipline. To understand my overall view, however, one must review information about the nature of theory from meta-theoreticians, or critics of theory. And I think that we will find that there are some similarities between a practical view of theory and ...


Back Cover Jan 1998

Back Cover

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Author Identifications Jan 1998

Author Identifications

Basic Communication Course Annual

No abstract provided.


Historical Romances: An Analysis Of Co-Constructed Narratives From Engaged Couples, Katie Himes Jan 1998

Historical Romances: An Analysis Of Co-Constructed Narratives From Engaged Couples, Katie Himes

Masters Theses

By studying the manner in which romantic partners tell accounts of their relationship events, researchers can gain insight into the process of relational development. This study examines how five engaged couples socially construct their own shared reality. Using critical incidents, couples first individually described three critical incidents common to engaged couples, including: their first meeting, worst fight, and decision to become a mutually exclusive couple. Next, couples collaborated to produce a shared narrative of significant events in the relationship. Through content analysis, the use of conflict avoidance is examined as a means of creating the collective reality. This research provides ...


Importance Of Nonverbal Communication In The Employment Interview, Michelle E. Milano Jan 1998

Importance Of Nonverbal Communication In The Employment Interview, Michelle E. Milano

Masters Theses

The employment interview includes elements that focus on nonverbal communication. Females and males view these nonverbal cues differently. A total of 22 male and 16 female employment interviewers completed quantitative and qualitative surveys concerning nonverbal cues. The data were analyzed using factor analysis, t-tests, and thematic analysis. Five factors, including self-presentation, coverbal cues, appearance, touch, and interviewee sex, emerged from the factor analysis. At 0.05, the t-tests show that females do perceive more nonverbal cues than do males. The qualitative results provide further insight into the quantitative results. These findings show the importance of nonverbal cues during an employment ...


Intercultural Romantic Couples' Interactive Construction Of Relational Culture, Amie D. Kincaid Jan 1998

Intercultural Romantic Couples' Interactive Construction Of Relational Culture, Amie D. Kincaid

Masters Theses

This study explores intercultural romantic couples and their interactive construction of relational culture. Qualitative methods of inquiry appeared most useful for identifying the processes involved in the social construction of intimates' shared reality and, so, both Conversation Analysis and Joint Interviews were utilized. Five romantic couples whose partners were socilaized within different cultural communities participated in the study. Findings of this study suggest that intercultural romantic couples import cultural resources from their individual cultures into their joint relational culture. These cultural resources included foods, traditions, language, and values. Findings of ths study also suggest that two types of communicative episodes ...