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Full-Text Articles in Interpersonal and Small Group Communication

Instructional Communication In Secondary Education, Sarah Downey May 2019

Instructional Communication In Secondary Education, Sarah Downey

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

Though several early instructional communication studies (e.g., McCroskey & Richmond, 1983) focused on a wide range of participants across what Fredriech and Nussbaum (2005) call the “developmental continuum,”(p. 580) the vast majority of work has centered on the college classroom. Thus, little is known about how instruction occurs in primary and secondary education contexts. Therefore, instructional communication scholars should examine the instructional communication issues faced by primary and secondary school instructors. The purpose of the proposed study was to provide a research agenda for instructional communication scholars regarding communication in the secondary (K-12) educational context. This research was an ...


Promoting Support For Public Health Policies Through Mediated Contact: Can Narrator Perspective And Self-Disclosure Curb In-Group Favoritism?, Riva Tukachinsky, Emily Brogan-Freitas, Tessa Urbanovich Jan 2019

Promoting Support For Public Health Policies Through Mediated Contact: Can Narrator Perspective And Self-Disclosure Curb In-Group Favoritism?, Riva Tukachinsky, Emily Brogan-Freitas, Tessa Urbanovich

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

An online 2 × 2 factorial experiment (N = 203) examined the effect of parasocial contact on support for public health policies in the context of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that because of an intergroup dynamic, individuals are less likely to engage with an outgroup character than an in-group character featured in a news magazine article. Results support the in-group favoritism hypothesis. The study examines two narrative devices for overcoming this tendency: the narrator’s perspective and amount of insight into the character’s inner world through character self-disclosure. We find support for the narrator perspective but not for the self-disclosure effect ...


Differential Effects Of Parental “Drug Talk” Styles And Family Communication Environments On Adolescent Substance Use, Youngju Shin, Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht Feb 2018

Differential Effects Of Parental “Drug Talk” Styles And Family Communication Environments On Adolescent Substance Use, Youngju Shin, Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

The current study examines the relationships among adolescent reports of parent–adolescent drug talk styles, family communication environments (e.g., expressiveness, structural traditionalism, and conflict avoidance), and adolescent substance use. ANCOVAs revealed that the 9th grade adolescents (N = 718) engaged in four styles of “drug talks” with parents (e.g., situated direct, ongoing direct, situated indirect, and ongoing indirect style) and these styles differed in their effect on adolescent substance use. Multiple regression analyses showed that expressiveness and structural traditionalism were negatively related to adolescent substance use, whereas conflict avoidance was positively associated with substance use. When controlling for family ...


Trends Of Parent-Adolescent Drug Talk Styles In Early Adolescence, Youngju Shin, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht, Janice L. Krieger Feb 2018

Trends Of Parent-Adolescent Drug Talk Styles In Early Adolescence, Youngju Shin, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht, Janice L. Krieger

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

The present study seeks to understand how parents as prevention agents approach substance use prevention messages during the period of early adolescence. Students (N = 410) in a drug prevention trial completed surveys from 7th to 9th grade. Using longitudinal data, a series of latent transition analyses was conducted to identify major trends of parent–adolescent drug talk styles (i.e., never talked, situated direct, ongoing direct, situated indirect, and ongoing indirect) in control and treatment conditions. Findings demonstrate a developmental trend in drug talk styles toward a situated style of talk as youth transitioned from 7th grade to 9th grade ...


Interviewing To Understand Strengths, Michael R. Hass Jan 2018

Interviewing To Understand Strengths, Michael R. Hass

Education Faculty Articles and Research

Interviewing clients about their strengths is an important part of developing a complete understanding of their lives and has several advantages over simply focusing on problems and pathology. Prerequisites for skillfully interviewing for strengths include the communication skills that emerge from a stance of not knowing, developing a vocabulary of strengths that allows practitioners to identify and name them, and having a “ear for strengths.” Building on this, Saleebey (2008) offers a framework of eight types of questions that allow us to explore strengths in depth with clients.


The Activist’S Perspective; Intergroup Conflict In Homeless Advocacy, Atty Mclellan Dec 2017

The Activist’S Perspective; Intergroup Conflict In Homeless Advocacy, Atty Mclellan

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

While the stereotyping of homeless has been the topic of numerous studies, stereotyping theory has rarely been used to examine the actions of the advocates and policymakers that surround the issue of homelessness. This study not only fills this gap, but even examines how stereotyping impacts advocates’ plans to mobilize and their overall goals. In 2017, homelessness became the top concern for residents in Orange County. At the start of February 2017, the Orange County government began a public works project that required the homeless people who were living in the Santa Ana riverbed to evacuate the area and relocate ...


A Longitudinal Study Of Parental Anti-Substance-Use Socialization For Early Adolescents’ Substance Use Behaviors, Youngju Shin, Michelle Miller-Day Mar 2017

A Longitudinal Study Of Parental Anti-Substance-Use Socialization For Early Adolescents’ Substance Use Behaviors, Youngju Shin, Michelle Miller-Day

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

The present study examines the role of communication in shaping norms and behaviors with significant personal and societal consequences. Based on primary socialization theory and the general theory of family communication, parental anti-substance-use socialization processes were hypothesized to influence early adolescents’ substance use norms and behaviors. Using longitudinal data (N =1,059), the results revealed that parent-adolescent prevention communication about substance use in the media and parental anti-substance-use injunctive norms were positively associated with early adolescents’ personal anti-substance-use norms, which, in turn, led to decreases in recent alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. It was also found that family expressiveness and ...


Parental Messages About Substance Use In Early Adolescence: Extending A Model Of Drug-Talk Styles, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Young Ju Shin, Janice L. Krieger, Michael L. Hecht, John W. Graham Feb 2017

Parental Messages About Substance Use In Early Adolescence: Extending A Model Of Drug-Talk Styles, Jonathan Pettigrew, Michelle Miller-Day, Young Ju Shin, Janice L. Krieger, Michael L. Hecht, John W. Graham

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

This study extends a typology of parent-offspring drug talk styles to early adolescents and investigates associations with adolescent substance use. Data come from a self-report survey associated with a school-based, 7th grade drug prevention curriculum. Mixed-methods were used to collect data across four measurement occasions spanning 30 months. Findings highlight frequencies of various drug-talk styles over time (i.e., situated direct, ongoing direct, situated indirect, ongoing indirect, never talked), messages adolescents hear from parents, and comparisons of alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use by drug talk style. This study advances understanding of parent-adolescent communication about substances and holds practical implications for ...


Parent Prevention Communication Profiles And Adolescent Substance Use: A Latent Profile Analysis And Growth Curve Model, Hye Jeong Choi, Michelle Miller-Day, Youngju Shin, Michael L. Hecht, Jonathan Pettigrew, Janice L. Krieger, Jeongkyu Lee, John W. Graham Jan 2017

Parent Prevention Communication Profiles And Adolescent Substance Use: A Latent Profile Analysis And Growth Curve Model, Hye Jeong Choi, Michelle Miller-Day, Youngju Shin, Michael L. Hecht, Jonathan Pettigrew, Janice L. Krieger, Jeongkyu Lee, John W. Graham

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

This current study identifies distinct parent prevention communication profiles and examines whether youth with different parental communication profiles have varying substance use trajectories over time. Eleven schools in two rural school districts in the Midwestern United States were selected, and 784 students were surveyed at three time points from the beginning of 7th grade to the end of 8th grade. A series of latent profile analyses were performed to identify discrete profiles/subgroups of substance-specific prevention communication (SSPC). The results revealed a 4-profile model of SSPC: Active-Open, Passive-Open, Active-Silent, and Passive-Silent. A growth curve model revealed different rates of lifetime ...


Social Media At Work: The Roles Of Job Satisfaction, Employment Status, And Facebook Use With Co-Workers, Brett W. Robertson, Kerk Kee Dec 2016

Social Media At Work: The Roles Of Job Satisfaction, Employment Status, And Facebook Use With Co-Workers, Brett W. Robertson, Kerk Kee

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

Limited research has studied workplace satisfaction in a computer-mediated context, particularly with the use of social media. Based on an analysis of an online survey of working adults (N=512) in various companies and organizations in a metropolitan area in Southern California, we tested the relationships among time spent on Facebook interacting with coworkers, employment status, and job satisfaction. Results show that an employee’s satisfaction at work is positively associated with the amount of time they spend on Facebook interacting with co-workers. Contrary to our initial predictions, results to the second and third hypotheses revealed that part time employees ...


Psychological Abuse, Mental Health, And Acceptance Of Dating Violence Among Adolescents, Jeff R. Temple, Hye Jeong Choi, Joanna Elmquist, Michael L. Hecht, Michelle Miller-Day, Gregory L. Stuart, Meagan Brem, Caitlin Wolford-Clevenger May 2016

Psychological Abuse, Mental Health, And Acceptance Of Dating Violence Among Adolescents, Jeff R. Temple, Hye Jeong Choi, Joanna Elmquist, Michael L. Hecht, Michelle Miller-Day, Gregory L. Stuart, Meagan Brem, Caitlin Wolford-Clevenger

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

Purpose

Existing literature indicates that acceptance of dating violence is a significant and robust risk factor for psychological dating abuse perpetration. Past work also indicates a significant relationship between psychological dating abuse perpetration and poor mental health. However, no known research has examined the relationship between acceptance of dating violence, perpetration of dating abuse, and mental health. In addition to exploring this complex relationship, the present study examines whether psychological abuse perpetration mediates the relationship between acceptance of dating violence and mental health (i.e., internalizing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hostility).

Methods

Three waves of longitudinal data were obtained ...


Information Diffusion, Facebook Clusters, And The Simplicial Model Of Social Aggregation: A Computational Simulation Of Simplicial Diffusers For Community Health Interventions, Kerk Kee, Lisa Sparks, Daniele C. Struppa, Mirco A. Manucci, Alberto Damiano Sep 2015

Information Diffusion, Facebook Clusters, And The Simplicial Model Of Social Aggregation: A Computational Simulation Of Simplicial Diffusers For Community Health Interventions, Kerk Kee, Lisa Sparks, Daniele C. Struppa, Mirco A. Manucci, Alberto Damiano

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters ...


Efficacy Of The Picture Exchange Communication Systemin Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder, Reagan Blason May 2015

Efficacy Of The Picture Exchange Communication Systemin Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder, Reagan Blason

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

The increasing diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) each year affect many families worldwide and are a major concern to therapists, healthcare workers, and educators. Many children diagnosed with ASD will never go on to develop functional speech or will have limited communication, as well as impaired social-communication skills. Limited communication makes education and therapy difficult for these children and their caregivers. Language therapy and interventions aim to improve social-communication and speech in these children, so it is crucial to find the most efficient interventions. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a common tool used to assist communication in ...


The Psychology Of Performance: A Growing Art, Shaina Hammer Dec 2014

The Psychology Of Performance: A Growing Art, Shaina Hammer

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

Somehow, though Chapman University is relatively small, there is a great deal of distance between each of its academic fields; the actors don't know what the music building looks like, the musicians have no idea what the dramatists are up to, and no one has any idea where the dance classes are held. But not only do the students of Chapman University's College of Performing Arts not know one another, they don't understand one another. More than once I have encountered a student with the same self-confidence issue as another. Without a doubt, performance majors have a ...


K-12 Teachers And Parents: How Do Length And Frequency Of Serial Arguments Affect Perceived Resolvability In The Parent-Teacher Relationship?, Jimena Galvan, Selena Pang, Paula Pearl, Justin Villasenor, Miranda Wall Dec 2014

K-12 Teachers And Parents: How Do Length And Frequency Of Serial Arguments Affect Perceived Resolvability In The Parent-Teacher Relationship?, Jimena Galvan, Selena Pang, Paula Pearl, Justin Villasenor, Miranda Wall

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

This paper aimed to study the relationship between length of serial arguments and perceived resolvability and number of serial arguments and perceived resolvability in the K-12 setting. Role theory explains people’s predictable behaviors based on the roles they take on; thus, it explains the role of parents and teachers in their unique relationships and how roles play into the level of involvement teachers and parents have in the education of children, which can inadvertently result in serial arguments. Role theory was chosen for this study because it works hand-in-hand with identifying predictable behaviors teachers and parents have that contribute ...


Chieftaincy-Based Community Dispute Resolution: The Case Of Sierra Leone, Whitney Mcintyre Miller Apr 2013

Chieftaincy-Based Community Dispute Resolution: The Case Of Sierra Leone, Whitney Mcintyre Miller

Education Faculty Articles and Research

Sierra Leone suffered a destructive 11-year civil war that largely left its communities torn apart and in need of vast redevelopment. One of the ways that communities are rebuilding and making efforts to move forward is through the chieftaincy-based community dispute resolution process. Based on historical norms, this process involves the community leader, or chief, helping to resolve disputes within the community. This article reviews this chieftaincy-based community dispute resolution process, discusses the types of disputes settled, and provides broader lessons learned for communities who may be interested in truly community-based dispute resolution.


Lessons Learned From Aac Camp, Janet L. Dodd Jan 2013

Lessons Learned From Aac Camp, Janet L. Dodd

Communication Sciences and Disorders Faculty Articles and Research

Children who benefit from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need not only the support of individuals knowledgeable in the technologies themselves, but ones who understand the translation of language intervention principles to AAC.


More Than Just Openness: Developing And Validating A Measure Of Targeted Parent-Child Communication About Alcohol, Michelle Miller-Day, Jennifer A. Kam Jan 2010

More Than Just Openness: Developing And Validating A Measure Of Targeted Parent-Child Communication About Alcohol, Michelle Miller-Day, Jennifer A. Kam

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

Research addressing parent-child communication on the topic of alcohol use relies heavily on assessing frequency of discussions and general assessments of openness in parent-child communication, ignoring the complexity of this communication phenomenon. This study adds to the literature by articulating a conceptualization and developing a measurement of parent-child communication—targeted parent-child communication about alcohol—and comparing the efficacy of targeted parent-child communication about alcohol in predicting positive expectancies of alcohol use and recent alcohol use. The predictive power of general openness in parent-child communication and frequency of communication about alcohol also were assessed. Students in 5th and 6th grade (N ...


Thinking Outside Of The Assessment Box: Assessing Social Communicative Functioning In Students With Asd, Janet L. Dodd Jan 2010

Thinking Outside Of The Assessment Box: Assessing Social Communicative Functioning In Students With Asd, Janet L. Dodd

Communication Sciences and Disorders Faculty Articles and Research

The assessment of a student suspected of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis requires the integration of information collected by a variety of professionals across various domains of functioning. One of the core deficits of students with ASD is a deficit related to social communicative competence (SCC). SCC requires the integration of language, social cognition, and higher order executive functions (Coggins, Olswang, Carmichael Olsson, & Timler, 2003) This article will propose an assessment model of social communicative functioning that was developed based on the SCC framework of Coggins and colleagues as a component of the Comprehensive Multidisciplinary Assessment Protocols for Autism ...


Empathy, Communication Skills, And Group Cohesiveness: A Systematic Approach, Michael Hass Jan 1981

Empathy, Communication Skills, And Group Cohesiveness: A Systematic Approach, Michael Hass

Education Faculty Articles and Research

"This article presents an approach to the teaching of interpersonal communication skills to children from 7-11 years of age, and should be of great interest to professionals in the fields of psychology, social work, education and people involved in training such persons."