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Health Communication Commons

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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

A Narrative And Performative Methodology For Understanding Adolescent Cancer Stories, Patrick Mcelearney Jun 2018

A Narrative And Performative Methodology For Understanding Adolescent Cancer Stories, Patrick Mcelearney

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

The field of health communication places considerable attention on coping with cancer, typically using social scientific approaches to investigate uncertainty, information, and/or social networks. Social scientific models of coping with adolescent cancer often measure how behaviors seek to manage cancer’s uncontrollability and/or uncertainty; however, how adolescents cope with cancer has been unclear. Short-term studies show adolescents typically and atypically cope. Long-term studies show a significant portion of survivors exhibit post-traumatic stress. The narrative and performative turns expose the role narratives and performatives play in shaping human subjects as meaning makers rather than merely information sharers. A narrative ...


Don't Ask, Don't Tell: Coming Out In An Alcoholic Family, Lisa M. Tillmann Ph.D. Jan 2015

Don't Ask, Don't Tell: Coming Out In An Alcoholic Family, Lisa M. Tillmann Ph.D.

Faculty Publications

This piece invites readers inside emotional and relational dynamics of coming

out as gay in an alcoholic family system. Taking an interpretive approach to

research, focused on how participants make sense of and make meaning

from their lived experience, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” offers a longitudinal and

narrative ethnographic account of family secrecy and disclosure.


Meaningful Research, Aging, And Positive Transformation, Carolyn Ellis, L Richardson, M Gergen, K Gergen, N Denzin, A Bochner Dec 2009

Meaningful Research, Aging, And Positive Transformation, Carolyn Ellis, L Richardson, M Gergen, K Gergen, N Denzin, A Bochner

Carolyn Ellis

Qualitative researchers are increasingly being called upon to become human rights advocates, to help individuals and communities honor the sanctity of life, and to promote the core values of privacy, justice, freedom, peace, and human dignity. In this volume of plenary papers from the Fifth International of Qualitative Inquiry in 2009, leading qualitative researchers show the various dimensions of the human rights work being done by scholar/activists in the social sciences, education, health care, social services, cultural studies, and other fields.


At Home With 'Real Americans': Communicating Across The Urban/Rural And Black/White Divides In The 2008 Presidential Election, Carolyn Ellis Dec 2008

At Home With 'Real Americans': Communicating Across The Urban/Rural And Black/White Divides In The 2008 Presidential Election, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

This ethnographic story seeks to reveal the complexity in talking across the urban/rural and Black/White divide in the 2008 Presidential Election.The story shows the tensions between feeling that an attempt to understand the other might help perpetuate the very intolerance we want to break through and feeling a responsibility to reach out and try to fashion a way out of prejudices and values with which we disagree. Is there a possibility for transformative dialogue and appreciative inquiry, where the four participants in this story might envision and generate a new, coconstructed reality, that all of them could ...


Negotiating Academic And Personal Selves (Chapter 4 Of The Book Between Gay And Straight: Understanding Friendship Across Sexual Orientation), Lisa M. Tillmann Ph.D. Jan 2001

Negotiating Academic And Personal Selves (Chapter 4 Of The Book Between Gay And Straight: Understanding Friendship Across Sexual Orientation), Lisa M. Tillmann Ph.D.

Faculty Publications

“Negotiating Academic and Personal Selves” is Chapter 4 of the book Between Gay and Straight: Understanding Friendship Across Sexual Orientation (AltaMira Press, 2001). Here I show how my relationships with the gay men of my research community alter how I position myself in graduate courses, how I practice research, how I write, and how I teach my classes. As a student, I delve into new projects on sexual orientation and identity; as an instructor, I alter course reading lists, assignments, and activities. This chapter also moves through my increasingly problematic encounters with associates who identify as heterosexual. My new consciousness ...


Narrative's Virtues, Art Bochner Dec 2000

Narrative's Virtues, Art Bochner

Art Bochner

Reacting to the charge that personal narratives, especially illness narratives, constitute a “blind alley” that misconstrues the essential nature of narrative by substituting a therapeutic for a sociological view of the person, this article speaks back to critics who regard narratives of suffering as privileged, romantic, and/or hyperauthentic. The author argues that this critique of personal narrative rests on an idealized and discredited theory of inquiry, a monolithic conception of ethnographic inquiry, a distinctly masculine characterization of sociology, and a veiled resistance to the moral, political, existential, and therapeutic goals of this work. Layering his responses to the critique ...


Negotiating Terminal Illness: Communication, Collusion, And Coalition In Caregiving, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1999

Negotiating Terminal Illness: Communication, Collusion, And Coalition In Caregiving, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

Given the relationship between trauma, loss, and interpersonal bonds, the editors have assembled a noteworthy list of contributions discussing trauma associated with close relationships (divorce, infertility, widowhood). Certainly, trauma is closely associated with loss. This edited volume offers the perspective of over twenty leading scholars in the study of trauma and loss. Each chapter offers extensive coverage of contemporary issues (terror management, rational suicide, spirituality, stigmatization). Relationship issues within these topics are also explored.


Criteria Against Ourselves, Art Bochner Dec 1999

Criteria Against Ourselves, Art Bochner

Art Bochner

In the social sciences, we usually think of criteria as culture-free standards that stand apart from human subjectivity and value. The author argues in this article, however, that conflicts over which criteria to apply usually boil down to differences in values that are contingent on human choices. The demand for criteria reflects the desire to contain freedom, limit possibilities, and resist change. Ultimately, all standards of evaluation rest on a research community’s agreement to comply with theirownhumanly developed conventions. The author ends by considering the personal standards that he applies to works that fall under the new rubric of ...


He(Art)Ful Autoethnography, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1998

He(Art)Ful Autoethnography, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

The author seeks to develop an ethnography that includes researchers’ vulnerable selves, emotions, bodies, and spirits; produces evocative stories that create the effect of reality; celebrates concrete experience and intimate detail; examines how human experience is endowed with meaning; is concerned with moral, ethical, and political consequences; encourages compassion and empathy; helps us know how to live and cope; features multiple voices and repositions readers and “subjects” as coparticipants in dialogue; seeks a fusion between social science and literature in which, as Gregory Bateson says, “you are partly blown by the winds of reality and partly an artist creating a ...


Bringing Emotion And Personal Narrative Into Medical Social Science, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1998

Bringing Emotion And Personal Narrative Into Medical Social Science, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

Comments on an article on the ethics of informed consent by Rose Weitz previously published in the periodical 'Health.' Family response to informed consent; Constraints imposed by social science research practices on Weitz' work; Ethics of the narrative approach to medical sociology.


I Hate My Voice: Coming To Terms With Bodily Stigmas, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1997

I Hate My Voice: Coming To Terms With Bodily Stigmas, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

This article presents a narrative, autoethnographic, theoretical account of the public and private negotiation of “minor bodily stigmas,” which are mild physical “imperfections” that make us fear we stand out and might be rejected. To examine the situated complexity of stigmatized identity, I tell a story that shows concrete interactional details of an episode in which minor bodily stigmas evolved into a significant topic of conversation between strangers. My personal narrative explores the felt experience of minor bodily stigmas from the perspective of the experiencing and interacting holder. Thus, my work problematizes Erving Goffman's sociological approach to stigmas, which ...


Speaking Of Dying: An Ethnographic Short Story, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1994

Speaking Of Dying: An Ethnographic Short Story, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

Dedication: This story is dedicated to the memory of my friend, Dr. Peter Frazer, who died on May 28, 1994, and to all those who struggle to live in the social world of AIDS.


Final Negotiations: A Story Of Love, Loss, And Chronic Illness, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1994

Final Negotiations: A Story Of Love, Loss, And Chronic Illness, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

"This is a remarkably revealing portrait of a couple dealing with a debilitating chronic illness." --Kirkus Reviews "In this deeply poignant and personal text Carolyn Ellis offers a brilliant account of how the lingering death of a loved one creates the occasion for radical redefinitions of self. Death is a shared project. Loved ones do not always go gently into the good night. This is a story of death, identity, and love. In this work Ellis gives Gene Weinstein the greatest gift of all, a loving death. In so doing, she shows all of us how to do the same ...