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Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Patients With Dementia Are Easy Victims To Predators, Ronald C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland, Audrey Depelteau, Amber E. Kinser, T. Kendall-Wilson, Kathleen Whalen Dec 2017

Patients With Dementia Are Easy Victims To Predators, Ronald C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland, Audrey Depelteau, Amber E. Kinser, T. Kendall-Wilson, Kathleen Whalen

Amber E. Kinser

Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease and particularly those in early stages, are susceptible to become victims of predators: Their agnosia (see Case 1) prevents them from detecting and accurately interpreting subtle signals that otherwise would have alerted them that they are about to fall for a scam. Furthermore, their judgment is impaired very early in the disease process, often before other symptoms manifest themselves and usually before a diagnosis is made. Patients with early stages of dementia are therefore prime targets for unscrupulous predators, and it behooves caregivers and health care professionals to ensure the integrity of these ...


Too Many Choices Confuse Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Amber Kinser, A. Depelteau, Rebecca Copeland, T. Kendall-Wilson, K. Whalen Dec 2017

Too Many Choices Confuse Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Amber Kinser, A. Depelteau, Rebecca Copeland, T. Kendall-Wilson, K. Whalen

Amber E. Kinser

Choices are often difficult to make by patients with Alzheimer Dementia. They often become acutely confused when faced with too many options because they are not able to retain in their working memory enough information about the various individual choices available. In this case study, we describe how an essentially simple benign task (choosing a dress to wear) can rapidly escalate and result in a catastrophic outcome. We examine what went wrong in the patient/caregiver interaction and how that potentially catastrophic situation could have been avoided or defused.


Hallucinations Are Real To Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, Amber E. Kinser, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland Dec 2017

Hallucinations Are Real To Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, Amber E. Kinser, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland

Amber E. Kinser

In this case study, we present a patient with preexistent posttraumatic stress disorder and psychosis who has been recently diagnosed with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. He is experiencing vivid hallucinations. What went wrong between him and his wife as a result of these hallucinations is presented. Alternative actions that could have been used are suggested.


Hallucinations Are Real To Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, Amber E. Kinser, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland Dec 2017

Hallucinations Are Real To Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, Amber E. Kinser, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland

ETSU Faculty Works

In this case study, we present a patient with preexistent posttraumatic stress disorder and psychosis who has been recently diagnosed with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. He is experiencing vivid hallucinations. What went wrong between him and his wife as a result of these hallucinations is presented. Alternative actions that could have been used are suggested.


Too Many Choices Confuse Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Amber Kinser, A. Depelteau, Rebecca Copeland, T. Kendall-Wilson, K. Whalen Dec 2017

Too Many Choices Confuse Patients With Dementia, R. C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Amber Kinser, A. Depelteau, Rebecca Copeland, T. Kendall-Wilson, K. Whalen

ETSU Faculty Works

Choices are often difficult to make by patients with Alzheimer Dementia. They often become acutely confused when faced with too many options because they are not able to retain in their working memory enough information about the various individual choices available. In this case study, we describe how an essentially simple benign task (choosing a dress to wear) can rapidly escalate and result in a catastrophic outcome. We examine what went wrong in the patient/caregiver interaction and how that potentially catastrophic situation could have been avoided or defused.


Patients With Dementia Are Easy Victims To Predators, Ronald C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland, Audrey Depelteau, Amber E. Kinser, T. Kendall-Wilson, Kathleen Whalen Dec 2017

Patients With Dementia Are Easy Victims To Predators, Ronald C. Hamdy, J. V. Lewis, Rebecca Copeland, Audrey Depelteau, Amber E. Kinser, T. Kendall-Wilson, Kathleen Whalen

ETSU Faculty Works

Patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease and particularly those in early stages, are susceptible to become victims of predators: Their agnosia (see Case 1) prevents them from detecting and accurately interpreting subtle signals that otherwise would have alerted them that they are about to fall for a scam. Furthermore, their judgment is impaired very early in the disease process, often before other symptoms manifest themselves and usually before a diagnosis is made. Patients with early stages of dementia are therefore prime targets for unscrupulous predators, and it behooves caregivers and health care professionals to ensure the integrity of these ...


The Person We Knew: Perceptions Of The Identity Of Loved Ones With Dementia By Family Caregivers, Amber Jannusch, Dena Huisman Dec 2015

The Person We Knew: Perceptions Of The Identity Of Loved Ones With Dementia By Family Caregivers, Amber Jannusch, Dena Huisman

Speaker & Gavel

While several studies have looked at the identity of dementia patients, most focus on the point of the view of the patient. However, caretakers’ and family members’ view of the identity of the dementia patient is unstudied. This study attempts to see how family caregivers’ view of their family member’s dementia manifests in communication about the loved one. This study is a preliminary examination of family caregivers’ constructions of the identity of their loved one, revealing that caretakers have one of three views: the patient without an identity, the patient as a different person, or the patient as “not ...


Idaho Careline 2-1-1 Data Analysis And Update To Idaho Legislators, Catherine Dickson, Adiya Jaffari Apr 2014

Idaho Careline 2-1-1 Data Analysis And Update To Idaho Legislators, Catherine Dickson, Adiya Jaffari

College of Health Sciences Presentations

The Idaho CareLine 2-1-1 Data Analysis and Update to Legislators project has consisted of analyzing and organizing data collected by the 2-1-1 CareLine throughout 2013 regarding Alzheimer’s information. Once significant data trends had been identified, a PowerPoint presentation was developed and presented to the Idaho House Health and Welfare Subcommittee, the Greater Idaho Chapter Alzheimer’s Association, and incorporated into a community education film evening on Alzheimer’s.


Implications Of Skinner's Verbal Behavior For Studying Dementia, Jeffrey Buchanan, Daniel Houlihan, Peter J.N. Linnerooth Jan 2010

Implications Of Skinner's Verbal Behavior For Studying Dementia, Jeffrey Buchanan, Daniel Houlihan, Peter J.N. Linnerooth

Psychology Faculty Publications

Persons with dementia experience continual declines in a number of abilities. Language abilities are particularly hard hit and become increasingly impaired as the underlying disease progresses. These language impairments make verbal communication very challenging for family and professional caregivers. As a result, caregivers may inadvertently punish verbal behavior, thereby exacerbating the deterioration of verbal repertoires. Although the topography of language impairments associated with dementia have been well described, less empirical work has been conducted concerning how to minimize these impairments and their deleterious effects. In 1957 B.F. Skinner outlined his conceptualization of language and cognition in his book Verbal ...