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Health Communication Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Cbpr And A Multitrack Model Of Development: A Critical Ethnography Of A Community-Based Health Communication Project., Jeanette Dillon, Kate Magsamen-Conrad Dec 2015

Cbpr And A Multitrack Model Of Development: A Critical Ethnography Of A Community-Based Health Communication Project., Jeanette Dillon, Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Scholars in development communication have called for a more participatory approach in development programs. However, the traditional, generally top-down approach associated with the modernization paradigm still dominates in practice [1]. The mere existence of participatory models has not been enough to move the participatory approach to prominence. Sparks has noticed the discrepancy between theory and practice observing that although the dominant paradigm has been disparaged and the participatory paradigm praised since the 1970s, researchers have been slow to adopt participatory methods [1]. This discrepancy may be because in practice, participation is difficult to manipulate, control, analyze and evaluate. We argue ...


Sleep Right, Live Bright: The Development Of A Campaign To Promote Healthy Sleep., Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Ladonne Wilson Apr 2015

Sleep Right, Live Bright: The Development Of A Campaign To Promote Healthy Sleep., Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Ladonne Wilson

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Sleep is an incredibly important activity, necessary for a number of important functions including healthy brain function and emotional well-being, physical health, daytime performance and safety (NHLBI, 2012). 50% of college students report that they experience sleepiness during the day and 70% report they get insufficient sleep; irregular sleep schedules are also a problem (Hershner & Chervin, 2014). Health campaigns are important communication tools with the potential to positively affect health behaviors. Hershner and Chervin (2014) have encouraged future researchers to prioritize investigations of effective and feasible interventions that disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a timely and cost effective manner. This paper describes the creation of a health campaign by and for college students to promote healthy sleep behaviors on a mid-sized, Midwestern college campus. Results from national and campus-centric surveys informed the campaign design, as did the health belief model (HBM; Rosenstock, 1974). Data was collected across four time points, including before campaign design, immediate post, delayed post, campaign re-launch, and extended post. Initial findings support HBM propositions, for example, that perceptions of susceptibility and severity are statistically significant predictors of sleep intentions. Additionally, results indicate ...


The Bgsu True Life Stress And Substance Use Campaign., Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Krys Ingman Apr 2015

The Bgsu True Life Stress And Substance Use Campaign., Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Krys Ingman

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2013) recommends that adults sleep seven to eight hours each night, it is estimated that college students sleep less than that (Cairney, Faulkner, Arbour-Nicitopoulos, & Kwan, 2013). Studies show that irregular sleep patterns have negative effects on students’ grades, reduce their ability to focus in class, and negatively affect their ability to memorize class material (Melton, Langdon & McDaniel, 2013; Orzech, Salafsky & Hamilton, 2011). Sleep is integral to a number of important functions including emotional well-being (NHLB, 2012). If sleep leads to decreased academic performance and negatively affects emotional well-being, we hypothesize that lack of sleep increases personal stress levels of college students. This article investigates the relationship between sleep and stress among students attending a mid-sized, Midwestern college, in an effort to develop a theoretically-based health campaign created by and for college students. About 30 IRB-certified student researchers participated in the design and collection of a longitudinal study assessing sleep and stress at their university (N=404 participants). Roughly 50% of these college students will continue with the project in Spring 2015, working to utilize the data collected to design and implement a theory-grounded health campaign to positively affect college students’ sleep and stress. Students are guided by the lead researcher who is implementing a community-based participatory research approach (CBPR; NIH, n.d.); graduate student team leaders will also help facilitate utilizing the CBPR model. Details about the results, campaign, and theories underpinning the campaign design and initial dissemination will be discussed at the conference.


Standing Up For Our Bodies: It’S On Us, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Katie Mcdonough Apr 2015

Standing Up For Our Bodies: It’S On Us, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette Dillon, Katie Mcdonough

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

This article details the development of a health campaign focused on preventing unwanted sexual advances that was launched on a Midwest university campus in the spring of 2014. Theories of communication privacy management (CPM; Petronio, 1991), the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1991), and the stages of behavior change model (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) informed the campaign designed by college students to educate others on campus that everyone has the power to prevent unwanted sexual advances with prevention as the ultimate goal. The campaign is currently being updated to support the national It’s On Us campaign (“It’s on ...


Sleep Well, Be Well: Teaching Students Positive Sleeping Habits To Create A Less Stressful Environment, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette M. Dillon, Kayleigh Bondor Apr 2015

Sleep Well, Be Well: Teaching Students Positive Sleeping Habits To Create A Less Stressful Environment, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Jeanette M. Dillon, Kayleigh Bondor

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2013) recommends that adults sleep seven to eight hours each night, it is estimated that college students sleep less than that (Cairney, Faulkner, Arbour-Nicitopoulos, & Kwan, 2013). Studies show that irregular sleep patterns have negative effects on students’ grades, reduce their ability to focus in class, and negatively affect their ability to memorize class material (Melton, Langdon & McDaniel, 2013; Orzech, Salafsky & Hamilton, 2011). Sleep is integral to a number of important functions including emotional well-being (NHLB, 2012). If sleep leads to decreased academic performance and negatively affects emotional well-being, we hypothesize that lack of sleep increases personal stress levels of college students. This article investigates the relationship between sleep and stress among students attending a mid-sized, Midwestern college, in an effort to develop a theoretically-based health campaign created by and for college students. About 30 IRB-certified student researchers participated in the design and collection of a longitudinal study assessing sleep and stress at their university (N=340 participants). Roughly 50% of these college students will continue with the project in Spring 2015, working to utilize the data collected to design and implement a theory-grounded health campaign to positively affect college students’ sleep and stress. Students are guided by the lead researcher who is implementing a community-based participatory research approach (CBPR; NIH, n.d.); graduate student team leaders will also help facilitate utilizing the CBPR model. Details about the results, campaign, and theories underpinning the campaign design and initial dissemination will be discussed at the conference.


Standing Up For Our Bodies: It's On Us Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad Dec 2014

Standing Up For Our Bodies: It's On Us Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

No abstract provided.


Scheduling Stress: A Study Of The Stresses Of A College Students’ Schedule. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad Dec 2014

Scheduling Stress: A Study Of The Stresses Of A College Students’ Schedule. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

No abstract provided.


Sleep Well, Be Well: Teaching Students Positive Sleeping Habits To Create A Less Stressful Environment. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad Dec 2014

Sleep Well, Be Well: Teaching Students Positive Sleeping Habits To Create A Less Stressful Environment. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

No abstract provided.


The Bgsu True Life Stress And Substance Use Campaign. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad Dec 2014

The Bgsu True Life Stress And Substance Use Campaign. Handout, Kate Magsamen-Conrad

Kate Magsamen-Conrad

No abstract provided.