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Health Communication Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Physician Communication With Seriously Ill Cancer Patients Results Of A Physician Survey, Michelle Campo, S. Kaplowitz Dec 1998

Physician Communication With Seriously Ill Cancer Patients Results Of A Physician Survey, Michelle Campo, S. Kaplowitz

Michelle L. Campo

No abstract provided.


He(Art)Ful Autoethnography, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1998

He(Art)Ful Autoethnography, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

The author seeks to develop an ethnography that includes researchers’ vulnerable selves, emotions, bodies, and spirits; produces evocative stories that create the effect of reality; celebrates concrete experience and intimate detail; examines how human experience is endowed with meaning; is concerned with moral, ethical, and political consequences; encourages compassion and empathy; helps us know how to live and cope; features multiple voices and repositions readers and “subjects” as coparticipants in dialogue; seeks a fusion between social science and literature in which, as Gregory Bateson says, “you are partly blown by the winds of reality and partly an artist creating a ...


Bringing Emotion And Personal Narrative Into Medical Social Science, Carolyn Ellis Dec 1998

Bringing Emotion And Personal Narrative Into Medical Social Science, Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

Comments on an article on the ethics of informed consent by Rose Weitz previously published in the periodical 'Health.' Family response to informed consent; Constraints imposed by social science research practices on Weitz' work; Ethics of the narrative approach to medical sociology.


Mental Health Parity: National And State Perspectives 1999, Bruce Lubotsky Levin, Ardis Hanson, Richard Coe Dec 1998

Mental Health Parity: National And State Perspectives 1999, Bruce Lubotsky Levin, Ardis Hanson, Richard Coe

Bruce Lubostsky Levin, DrPH, MPH

Mental health parity legislation could substantially reduce the degree to which financial responsibility for the treatment of mental illness is shifted to government, especially state and local government. There is substantial evidence that both mental health and addictions treatment is effective in reducing the utilization and costs of medical services. There appears to be a lack of substantial evidence to discourage Florida from pursuing mental health and substance abuse parity legislation.