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Health Communication Commons

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2015

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Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Information Diffusion, Facebook Clusters, And The Simplicial Model Of Social Aggregation: A Computational Simulation Of Simplicial Diffusers For Community Health Interventions, Kerk Kee, Lisa Sparks, Daniele C. Struppa, Mirco A. Manucci, Alberto Damiano Sep 2015

Information Diffusion, Facebook Clusters, And The Simplicial Model Of Social Aggregation: A Computational Simulation Of Simplicial Diffusers For Community Health Interventions, Kerk Kee, Lisa Sparks, Daniele C. Struppa, Mirco A. Manucci, Alberto Damiano

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters ...


Information Scanning And Vaccine Safety Concerns Among African American, Mexican American, And Non-Hispanic White Women, Meghan Bridgid Moran, Lauren B. Frank, Joyee S. Chatterjee, Sheila T. Murphy, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati Aug 2015

Information Scanning And Vaccine Safety Concerns Among African American, Mexican American, And Non-Hispanic White Women, Meghan Bridgid Moran, Lauren B. Frank, Joyee S. Chatterjee, Sheila T. Murphy, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati

Communication Faculty Publications and Presentations

Objective

A significant number of parents delay or refuse vaccinating their children. Incidental exposure to vaccine information (i.e., scanned information) may be an important contributor to anti-vaccine sentiment. This study examines the association between scanned information, trust in health information sources and vaccine safety concerns among African American, Mexican American, and non-Hispanic White women.

Methods

Women (N=761) in Los Angeles County were sampled via random digit dial and surveyed regarding use of and trust in health information resources and vaccine safety concerns.

Results

Analyses indicate that the sources of information associated with vaccine safety concerns varied by ethnicity ...


Implementing Shared Decision-Making: Consider All The Consequences, Glyn Elwyn, Dominick L. Frosch, Sarah Kobrin Aug 2015

Implementing Shared Decision-Making: Consider All The Consequences, Glyn Elwyn, Dominick L. Frosch, Sarah Kobrin

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

The ethical argument that shared decision-making is “the right” thing to do, however laudable, is unlikely to change how healthcare is organized, just as evidence alone will be an insufficient factor: practice change is governed by factors such as cost, profit margin, quality, and efficiency. It is helpful, therefore, when evaluating new approaches such as shared decision-making to conceptualize potential consequences in a way that is broad, long-term, and as relevant as possible to multiple stakeholders. Yet, so far, evaluation metrics for shared decision-making have been mostly focused on short-term outcomes, such as cognitive or affective consequences in patients. The ...


Investing In Communication For Nutrition Related To Agriculture In India, Robert Hornik, Danielle Naugle, William Smith, Tanya Trevors Aug 2015

Investing In Communication For Nutrition Related To Agriculture In India, Robert Hornik, Danielle Naugle, William Smith, Tanya Trevors

Departmental Papers (ASC)

No abstract provided.


Illness Narratives Of Women With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus And Family Communication: A Mixed Methods Study, Katherine M. Castle Aug 2015

Illness Narratives Of Women With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus And Family Communication: A Mixed Methods Study, Katherine M. Castle

Communication Studies Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prominent, yet under-studied autoimmune condition that is both life limiting and potentially life threatening and affects more than one million Americans, primarily women. Despite this, the disease continues to go undiagnosed and unmanaged, leading to more severe outcomes of the disease process. Though there is growing recognition of the importance of social behaviors in improving health outcomes, particularly family communication and sense-making, there is a paucity of research aimed at understanding the experience of SLE and how women make sense of the disease in family contexts. This exploratory sequential mixed methods project is framed ...


I Know I Can: Feeling Confident About Discussing Cancer May Help Couples' Cancer Management, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Maria K. Venetis, M. G. Checton, K. Greene Jun 2015

I Know I Can: Feeling Confident About Discussing Cancer May Help Couples' Cancer Management, Kate Magsamen-Conrad, Maria K. Venetis, M. G. Checton, K. Greene

School of Media and Communication Faculty Publications

Managing chronic illness, especially something like cancer, affects more than the diagnosed person. Cancer also affects partners, families, and loved ones. In our study, we were interested in how cancer affects communication patterns between survivors and their partners. We wanted to apply a model that explains chronic illness management in couples to see if we could determine how parts of a relationship, uncertainty about cancer prognosis, and the confidence people have in talking with partners about the cancer affect couples’ ability to manage the disease.


Emotional Reaction Facilitates The Brain And Behavioral Impact Of Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels In Smokers, An-Li Wang, Steven B. Lowen, Daniel Romer, Mario Giorno, Daniel D. Langleben May 2015

Emotional Reaction Facilitates The Brain And Behavioral Impact Of Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels In Smokers, An-Li Wang, Steven B. Lowen, Daniel Romer, Mario Giorno, Daniel D. Langleben

Neuroethics Publications

Background—Warning labels on cigarette packages are an important venue for information about the hazards of smoking. The 2009 US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act mandated replacing the current text-only labels with graphic warning labels. However, labels proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were challenged in court by the tobacco companies, who argued successfully that the proposed labels needlessly encroached on their right to free speech, in part because they included images of high emotional salience that indiscriminately frightened rather than informed consumers.

Methods—We used functional MRI to examine the effects of graphic warning labels ...


The Use Of Exemplars In Audio-Based Media To Increase Behavioral Intent In Adopting Preventive Skin-Cancer Behaviors, Christine M. Lemme May 2015

The Use Of Exemplars In Audio-Based Media To Increase Behavioral Intent In Adopting Preventive Skin-Cancer Behaviors, Christine M. Lemme

Master of Arts in Communication

Skin cancer is a growing concern in the young-adult population due to the popularity of indoor ultraviolet (UV) tanning and the acceptance of numerous myths that skin cancer is not a major health concern. This thesis aims to look at the use of media exemplar perceived to be similar and credible to the target population in order to persuade the target population to adopt preventative skin-cancer behaviors. College students of both genders and various ethnicities (N = 170) were surveyed after listening to different radio exemplars on skin cancer. Results indicated that similarity and credibility play a key role in increasing ...


Swords Into Stethoscopes: How The U.S. Military Could Conduct Medical Diplomacy, Oliver Kendall May 2015

Swords Into Stethoscopes: How The U.S. Military Could Conduct Medical Diplomacy, Oliver Kendall

Political Science Honors Projects

Since the early 1960’s, Cuba and China have won international appreciation by sending doctors abroad to help where they are needed. While there was surprise in some quarters when U.S. military personnel were deployed to combat Ebola in the last months of 2014, the Department of Defense actually has a long history of medical activity. In its current form, DoD medical outreach cannot likely garner soft power in the way that the Chinese and Cuban programs can, but with a few modifications, the U.S. military could be a serious conductor of medical diplomacy that would save countless ...


An Evaluator’S Journey Toward Bayes: Part Ii, Joshua P. Twomey Apr 2015

An Evaluator’S Journey Toward Bayes: Part Ii, Joshua P. Twomey

Center for Health Policy and Research (CHPR) Publications

Blog post to AEA365, a blog sponsored by the American Evaluation Association (AEA) dedicated to highlighting Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, and Lessons Learned for evaluators. The American Evaluation Association is an international professional association of evaluators devoted to the application and exploration of program evaluation, personnel evaluation, technology, and many other forms of evaluation. Evaluation involves assessing the strengths and weaknesses of programs, policies, personnel, products, and organizations to improve their effectiveness.


An Evaluator’S Journey Toward Bayes: Part I, Joshua P. Twomey Apr 2015

An Evaluator’S Journey Toward Bayes: Part I, Joshua P. Twomey

Center for Health Policy and Research (CHPR) Publications

Blog post to AEA365, a blog sponsored by the American Evaluation Association (AEA) dedicated to highlighting Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, and Lessons Learned for evaluators. The American Evaluation Association is an international professional association of evaluators devoted to the application and exploration of program evaluation, personnel evaluation, technology, and many other forms of evaluation. Evaluation involves assessing the strengths and weaknesses of programs, policies, personnel, products, and organizations to improve their effectiveness.


A View Of Oral Communication Activities In Food Science From The Perspective Of A Communication Researcher, Denise A. Vrchota Apr 2015

A View Of Oral Communication Activities In Food Science From The Perspective Of A Communication Researcher, Denise A. Vrchota

English Publications

Food science researchers have pronounced the Institute of Food Technologists Success Skills to be the most important competency mastered by graduates entering the work force. Much of the content and outcomes of the Success Skills pertains to oral communication skills of public speaking and interpersonal and group communication. This qualitative study reports the results of an examination of oral communication activities in the classes of 9 faculty in the food science program at Iowa State Univ. The findings revealed communication activities in the classes that support the Success Skills oral communication mandates; however, the food science faculty did not explicitly ...


Sexual Goals-Plans-Actions: Toward A Sexual Script In Marriage, Tina Coffelt, Jon A. Hess Apr 2015

Sexual Goals-Plans-Actions: Toward A Sexual Script In Marriage, Tina Coffelt, Jon A. Hess

English Publications

This study introduces a sexual script in heterosexual marriage, based on interviews with 12 married women and 13 married men. The qualitative data analysis revealed a two-phase sexual script, beginning with priming messages and culminating in synchronizing messages. Synchronizing messages took one of three forms—in-synch, token acceptance, or out-of-synch. In-synch messages showed alignment between an initiation message and an acceptance message such that a sexual episode occurred. Token acceptance messages, made by women, conveyed compliance with a sexual episode despite low desire. Out-of-synch messages rejected an initiation message.


The Influence Of Instagram On Exercise And Eating Behavior, Bridgette Kosek Apr 2015

The Influence Of Instagram On Exercise And Eating Behavior, Bridgette Kosek

Honors Projects in Marketing

The use of social media, specifically Instagram, of 305 Bryant University students ages 18-28 was investigated through student completion of an online survey to examine how following exercise and food related Instagram accounts impacts behavior. Both male and females use Instagram fairly equally, though males are more responsive to food Instagram accounts than females, who have no significant difference in behavior. Both males and females who follow exercise Instagram accounts are significantly more active than those who do not follow exercise Instagram accounts. Given the recent explosive use of Instagram in the population, the implications for this study are enormous ...


Effect Of Females In Leadership Roles On Menstrual Sanitation In Rural Jamkhed, India, Kirsten Hughes Apr 2015

Effect Of Females In Leadership Roles On Menstrual Sanitation In Rural Jamkhed, India, Kirsten Hughes

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Introduction: Menstruation is integral to puberty and maturation of adolescent girls. Education about menstruation and menstrual hygiene effects a woman’s physical and psychosocial health through the majority of her life.

Purpose: This study seeks to answer the following questions: Who is providing information to girls before or after their first menstruation? Is this information timely, appropriate and accurate? Is the information effective enough to see changes in menstrual practices through a family and community? In answering these questions, the study attempts to determine the pathways of communications regarding menstruation and menstrual health in the Jamkhed area of the Ahmednagar ...


Comfort, Complexities, And Confrontation: Health Care Provider Communication And Prescription Drug Abuse And Misuse, Nicholas E. Hagemeier, Fred Tudiver Mar 2015

Comfort, Complexities, And Confrontation: Health Care Provider Communication And Prescription Drug Abuse And Misuse, Nicholas E. Hagemeier, Fred Tudiver

ETSU Faculty Works

This presentation describes (1) the role of communication in prescription drug abuse prevention and treatment and (2) the outcomes of 5 focus groups conducted in the Appalachian Region.


Etsu Didarp Project 1: Health Care Provider Communication And Prescription Drug Abuse And Misuse, Nicholas E. Hagemeier, Fred Tudiver Mar 2015

Etsu Didarp Project 1: Health Care Provider Communication And Prescription Drug Abuse And Misuse, Nicholas E. Hagemeier, Fred Tudiver

ETSU Faculty Works

No abstract provided.


The Gas Cylinder, The Motorcycle And The Village Health Team Member: A Proof-Of-Concept Study For The Use Of The Microsystems Quality Improvement Approach To Strengthen The Routine Immunization System In Uganda, Dorothy A. Bazos, Lea R. Ayers Lafave, Gautham Suresh, Kevin C. Shannon, Fred Nuwaha, Mark E. Splaine Mar 2015

The Gas Cylinder, The Motorcycle And The Village Health Team Member: A Proof-Of-Concept Study For The Use Of The Microsystems Quality Improvement Approach To Strengthen The Routine Immunization System In Uganda, Dorothy A. Bazos, Lea R. Ayers Lafave, Gautham Suresh, Kevin C. Shannon, Fred Nuwaha, Mark E. Splaine

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Although global efforts to support routine immunization (RI) system strengthening have resulted in higher immunization rates, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the proportion of children receiving recommended DPT3 vaccines has stagnated at 80% for the past 3 years (WHO Fact sheet-Immunization coverage 2014, WHO, 2014). Meeting the WHO goal of 90% national DPT3 coverage may require locally based strategies to support conventional approaches. The Africa Routine Immunization Systems Essentials-System Innovation (ARISE-SI) initiative is a proof-of-concept study to assess the application of the Microsystems Quality Improvement Approach for generating local solutions to strengthen RI systems and reach those unreached ...


Accessing Healthcare: The Experience Of Individuals With Asd In Maine Report Summary, Alan Kurtz, Nancy Cronin Mar 2015

Accessing Healthcare: The Experience Of Individuals With Asd In Maine Report Summary, Alan Kurtz, Nancy Cronin

Health and Well-Being

A summary of report findings from the published research report, Accessing Healthcare: The Experience of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Maine (2014).


Improving Patient Notification Of Solid Abdominal Viscera Incidental Findings With A Standardized Protocol, Courtney E. Collins, Nicole Cherng, Theodore P. Mcdade, Babak Movahedi, Timothy A. Emhoff, Giles F. Whalen, Jennifer Lafemina, Jon D. Dorfman Feb 2015

Improving Patient Notification Of Solid Abdominal Viscera Incidental Findings With A Standardized Protocol, Courtney E. Collins, Nicole Cherng, Theodore P. Mcdade, Babak Movahedi, Timothy A. Emhoff, Giles F. Whalen, Jennifer Lafemina, Jon D. Dorfman

Open Access Articles

BACKGROUND: The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) scans in the evaluation of trauma patients has led to increased detection of incidental radiologic findings. Incidental findings (IFs) of the abdominal viscera are among the most commonly discovered lesions and can carry a risk of malignancy. Despite this, patient notification regarding these findings is often inadequate.

METHODS: We identified patients who underwent abdominopelvic CTs as part of their trauma evaluation during a recent 1-year period (9/2011-8/2012). Patients with IFs of the kidneys, liver, adrenal glands, pancreas and/or ovaries had their charts reviewed for documentation of the lesion in ...


Telling Stories, Saving Lives: Creating Narrative Health Messages, Lauren B. Frank, Sheila T. Murphy, Joyee S. Chatterjee, Meghan B. Moran, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati Feb 2015

Telling Stories, Saving Lives: Creating Narrative Health Messages, Lauren B. Frank, Sheila T. Murphy, Joyee S. Chatterjee, Meghan B. Moran, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati

Communication Faculty Publications and Presentations

Increasingly, health communication practitioners are exploring the use of narrative storytelling to convey health information. For this study, a narrative film was produced to provide information about the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer prevention. The storyline centered on Lupita, a young woman recently diagnosed with HPV who informs her family about HPV and the availability of the HPV vaccine for her younger sister. The objective was to examine the roles of identification with characters and narrative involvement (made up of three dimensions: involvement, perceived relevance, and immersion) on perceived response efficacy, perceived severity, and perceived susceptibility to HPV and ...


Validating Estimates Of Prevalence Of Non-Communicable Diseases Based On Household Surveys: The Symptomatic Diagnosis Study, Spencer L. James, Minerva Romero, Dolores Ramírez-Villalobos, Sara Gómez Jan 2015

Validating Estimates Of Prevalence Of Non-Communicable Diseases Based On Household Surveys: The Symptomatic Diagnosis Study, Spencer L. James, Minerva Romero, Dolores Ramírez-Villalobos, Sara Gómez

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Easy-to-collect epidemiological information is critical for the more accurate estimation of the prevalence and burden of different non-communicable diseases around the world. Current measurement is restricted by limitations in existing measurement systems in the developing world and the lack of biometry tests for non-communicable diseases. Diagnosis based on self-reported signs and symptoms (“Symptomatic Diagnosis,” or SD) analyzed with computer-based algorithms may be a promising method for collecting timely and reliable information on non-communicable disease prevalence. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the performance of a symptom-based questionnaire to estimate prevalence of non-communicable diseases in low-resource areas.


Assessments Of The Extent To Which Health‐Care Providers Involve Patients In Decision Making: A Systematic Review Of Studies Using The Option Instrument, Nicolas Couët, Sophie Desroches, Hubert Robitaille, Hugues Vaillancourt, Annie Leblanc, Stéphane Turcotte, Glyn Elwyn, France Légaré Jan 2015

Assessments Of The Extent To Which Health‐Care Providers Involve Patients In Decision Making: A Systematic Review Of Studies Using The Option Instrument, Nicolas Couët, Sophie Desroches, Hubert Robitaille, Hugues Vaillancourt, Annie Leblanc, Stéphane Turcotte, Glyn Elwyn, France Légaré

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Background: We have no clear overview of the extent to which health-care providers involve patients in the decision-making process during consultations. The Observing Patient Involvement in Decision Making instrument (OPTION) was designed to assess this. Objective: To systematically review studies that used the OPTION instrument to observe the extent to which health-care providers involve patients in decision making across a range of clinical contexts, including different health professions and lengths of consultation. We conducted online literature searches in multiple databases (2001-12) and gathered further data through networking.


Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts: What Have We Learned? Highlights From A Conversation Of Funders And Evaluators, Sumner M. Redstone Global Center For Prevention And Wellness Jan 2015

Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts: What Have We Learned? Highlights From A Conversation Of Funders And Evaluators, Sumner M. Redstone Global Center For Prevention And Wellness

Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness

Table of contents:

Executive Summary

Introduction

State of the Obesity Epidemic

The Community Context for Interventions and Evaluations

Investments to Date: Where Is the Strongest Agreement About What Works?

Early Care and Education Environments

Schools/Learning Environments

Parks, Trails, Open Spaces, and Recreation

Land Use and Transportation

The Next Tier: Mixed or Promising Results for Healthy Food Retail Interventions

Implementing Interventions: The Crucial Role of "How"

Other Topics

Summary and Next Steps

Appendix A: Citations and Resources for Key Elements/Components


The Effect Of A “Micronegotiation” Technique On Team Interactions, Jeffery Kaufman Ph.D. Jan 2015

The Effect Of A “Micronegotiation” Technique On Team Interactions, Jeffery Kaufman Ph.D.

Faculty Publications and Research

Conflict can have detrimental effects on team interaction, performance, and member satisfaction, so research on tools and techniques aimed at reducing or resolving conflict is crucial. This study trained the leaders of teams made up of health profession students on a micronegotiation technique (Rogers & Lingard, 2006) to measure its effect on levels of task conflict, relationship conflict, team performance, and team member satisfaction. The research was conducted at a mid-size, Midwestern university and included 148 students from Radiology, Physiology, and Microbiology courses divided into 47 teams. No statistically significant differences were identified for any of the dependent variables between the ...


Survey Evaluation Of Pharmacy Practice Involving Deaf Patients, Mckenzie C. Ferguson, Leah M. Shan Jan 2015

Survey Evaluation Of Pharmacy Practice Involving Deaf Patients, Mckenzie C. Ferguson, Leah M. Shan

Pharmacy Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

For a patient that is deaf, providing patient care can be more difficult due to communication barriers. This study was conducted in order to better understand pharmacists’ current means of communicating with deaf patients as well as investigating pharmacists’ knowledge of their legal responsibility to these patients.

Methods

Surveys were used to gather information from pharmacists and were distributed in areas with a large population of deaf patients.


Student Feedback On Advocacy, Jennifer Anderson Jan 2015

Student Feedback On Advocacy, Jennifer Anderson

Communication Studies Publications

This report documents the feedback on the student canvassing portion of the Breastfeeding-Friendly Businesses Initiative. The feedback was provided from undergraduate and graduate students in the Health Communication class at South Dakota State University. These students participated in two in-class training days (totaling 3 hours) and two community advocacy periods (totaling 3 hours). They provided feedback on the training, the advocacy experience, the initiative itself, and their learning.


Impact Of Student Canvassing For Breastfeeding-Friendly Business Initiative, Jennifer Anderson Jan 2015

Impact Of Student Canvassing For Breastfeeding-Friendly Business Initiative, Jennifer Anderson

Communication Studies Publications

Students spoke with 128 business representatives. A total of 133 businesses were approached, but 5 were closed on canvassing days. There was a 70.6% response rate for the survey.

79 of the business representatives (61.7%) were authorized to provide an answer on the breastfeeding-friendly designation. Among these businesses, the response rate was 88.6%
49 of the business representatives (38.3%) were not authorized to provide an answer, often because of needing to get approval from corporate—or other off-site—management. The responses rate for these businesses was 11.4%; most refused the survey.

The results provided below ...


Dancing Around Infertility: The Use Of Metaphors In A Complex Medical Situation, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Janice L. Krieger Jan 2015

Dancing Around Infertility: The Use Of Metaphors In A Complex Medical Situation, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Janice L. Krieger

Papers in Communication Studies

People use metaphors to cognitively frame their experiences as well as to explain those experiences to others, especially in complex medical situations. However, previous research has not fully explored the extent to which metaphors may be helpful or harmful to achieving well-being. This investigation fills this gap by identifying and explaining metaphor use in the context of infertility. Guided by self-determination theory, in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 women and men who had experienced an inability to conceive a child. Analysis of participant narratives yielded 10 prominent metaphors that reflect how participants’ need for competence, autonomy, and relatedness were (and ...


Comprehension Of Randomization And Uncertainty In Cancer Clinical Trials Decision Making Among Rural, Appalachian Patients, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Phokeng M. Dailey, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett Jan 2015

Comprehension Of Randomization And Uncertainty In Cancer Clinical Trials Decision Making Among Rural, Appalachian Patients, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Phokeng M. Dailey, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett

Papers in Communication Studies

Comprehension of randomization is a vital, but understudied, component of informed consent to participate incancer randomized clinical trials(RCTs). Thisstudy examines patient comprehension of the randomization process as well as sources of ongoing uncertainty that may inhibit a patient’s ability to provide informed consent to participate in RCTs. Cancer patients living in rural Appalachia who were offeredanopportunitytoparticipateinacancertreatmentRCT completed in-depth interviews and a brief survey. No systematic differences in randomization comprehension between patients who consented and those who declined participation in a cancer RCT were detected. Comprehension is conceptually distinct from uncertainty, with patients who had both high and low ...