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Health Communication Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Associations Between Coherent Neural Activity, Nicole Cooper, Steven Tompson, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Jean M. Vettel, Danielle S. Bassett, Emily B. Falk Apr 2018

Associations Between Coherent Neural Activity, Nicole Cooper, Steven Tompson, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Jean M. Vettel, Danielle S. Bassett, Emily B. Falk

Departmental Papers (ASC)

Objective: Worldwide, tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and illness. One common strategy for reducing the prevalence of cigarette smoking and other health risk behaviors is the use of graphic warning labels (GWLs). This has led to widespread interest from the perspective of health psychology in understanding the mechanisms of GWL effectiveness. Here we investigated differences in how the brain responds to negative, graphic warning label-inspired antismoking ads and neutral control ads, and we probed how this response related to future behavior.

Method: A group of smokers (N = 45) viewed GWL-inspired and control antismoking ads while undergoing ...


Young Adult Smokers' Neural Response To Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels, Adam E. Green, Darren Mays, Emily B. Falk, Donna Vallone, Natalie Gallagher, Amanda Richardson, Kenneth P. Tercyak, David B. Abrams, Raymond S. Niaura Jun 2016

Young Adult Smokers' Neural Response To Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels, Adam E. Green, Darren Mays, Emily B. Falk, Donna Vallone, Natalie Gallagher, Amanda Richardson, Kenneth P. Tercyak, David B. Abrams, Raymond S. Niaura

Departmental Papers (ASC)

Introduction: The study examined young adult smokers' neural response to graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Methods: Nineteen young adult smokers (M age 22.9, 52.6% male, 68.4% non-white, M 4.3 cigarettes/day) completed pre-scan, self-report measures of demographics, cigarette smoking behavior, and nicotine dependence, and an fMRI scanning session. During the scanning session participants viewed cigarette pack images (total 64 stimuli, viewed 4 s each) that varied based on the warning label (graphic or visually occluded control) and pack branding (branded or plain packaging) in an event-related experimental design ...


Functional Brain Imaging Predicts Public Health Campaign Success, Emily B. Falk, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Steven Tompson, Richard Gonzalez, Sonya Dal Cin, Victor J. Strecher, Kenneth M. Cummings, Lawrence An Feb 2016

Functional Brain Imaging Predicts Public Health Campaign Success, Emily B. Falk, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Steven Tompson, Richard Gonzalez, Sonya Dal Cin, Victor J. Strecher, Kenneth M. Cummings, Lawrence An

Departmental Papers (ASC)

Mass media can powerfully affect health decision-making. Pre-testing through focus groups or surveys is a standard, though inconsistent, predictor of effectiveness. Converging evidence demonstrates that activity within brain systems associated with self-related processing can predict individual behavior in response to health messages. Preliminary evidence also suggests that neural activity in small groups can forecast population-level campaign outcomes. Less is known about the psychological processes that link neural activity and population-level outcomes, or how these predictions are affected by message content. We exposed 50 smokers to antismoking messages and used their aggregated neural activity within a ‘self-localizer’ defined region of medial ...


Brain Activity In Self- And Value-Related Regions In Response To Online Antismoking Messages Predicts Behavior Change, Nicole Cooper, Steven Tompson, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Emily B. Falk Jan 2015

Brain Activity In Self- And Value-Related Regions In Response To Online Antismoking Messages Predicts Behavior Change, Nicole Cooper, Steven Tompson, Matthew B. O'Donnell, Emily B. Falk

Departmental Papers (ASC)

In this study, we combined approaches from media psychology and neuroscience to ask whether brain activity in response to online antismoking messages can predict smoking behavior change. In particular, we examined activity in subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex linked to self- and value-related processing, to test whether these neurocognitive processes play a role in message-consistent behavior change. We observed significant relationships between activity in both brain regions of interest and behavior change (such that higher activity predicted a larger reduction in smoking). Furthermore, activity in these brain regions predicted variance independent of traditional, theory-driven self-report metrics such as intention ...