Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Health Communication Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Central Florida

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 27 of 27

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Complete Issue, Volume 2 Issue 1 Mar 2019

Complete Issue, Volume 2 Issue 1

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

This is the full issue of JICRCR Volume 2, Issue 1.


From Hoax As Crisis To Crisis As Hoax: Fake News And Information Disorder As Disruptions To The Discourse Of Renewal, Timothy L. Sellnow, Adam Parrish, Lauren Semenas Mar 2019

From Hoax As Crisis To Crisis As Hoax: Fake News And Information Disorder As Disruptions To The Discourse Of Renewal, Timothy L. Sellnow, Adam Parrish, Lauren Semenas

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Hoaxes have long been a reputational threat to organizations. For example, false claims that syringes had been found in bottles of Pepsi-Cola products, that a portion of a fi nger had been found in Wendy’s chili, and that Domino’s employees had intentionally served contaminated food to customers have topped the media’s agenda. More recently, the hoax phenomenon has been tactically reversed. Heavily trafficked Internet sites and controversial television personalities frequently argue that well-documented crises themselves are hoaxes. The potential for claims of crisis as hoax to disrupt the discourse of crisis renewal is examined through an analysis ...


The Effects Of Community Size, Control Over Agenda, And Contextual Variables On Zika Virus Preparation Of Public Information Officers At Local Public Health Departments, Elizabeth Johnson Avery Mar 2019

The Effects Of Community Size, Control Over Agenda, And Contextual Variables On Zika Virus Preparation Of Public Information Officers At Local Public Health Departments, Elizabeth Johnson Avery

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

As Zika emerged as a major global health threat, public information officers (PIOs) at local public health departments across the United States prepared for outbreaks of the virus amid great uncertainty. Using the crisis and risk emergency communication (CERC) model to inform this study, PIOs (n = 226) at public health departments were surveyed to assess how community size, perceived control over health agenda, and other considerations such as resources and federal influences affected their satisfaction with Zika preparedness in their departments. These contextual, indirect factors may moderate planning efforts for Zika and other health emergencies and thus should be considered ...


Engaging Communities In Emergency Risk And Crisis Communication: Mixed-Method Systematic Review And Evidence Synthesis, Julie M. Novak, Ashleigh M. Day, Pradeep Sopory, Lee Wilkins, Donyale Renaye Padgett, Stine Eckert, Jane Noyes, Tomas Allen, Nyka Alexander, Marsha Vanderford, Gaya Gamhewage Mar 2019

Engaging Communities In Emergency Risk And Crisis Communication: Mixed-Method Systematic Review And Evidence Synthesis, Julie M. Novak, Ashleigh M. Day, Pradeep Sopory, Lee Wilkins, Donyale Renaye Padgett, Stine Eckert, Jane Noyes, Tomas Allen, Nyka Alexander, Marsha Vanderford, Gaya Gamhewage

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

The World Health Organization (WHO) commissioned systematic reviews to assist with the development of new emergency risk communication guidelines that will impact responses and distribution of resources at all levels. This mixed-method evidence synthesis, guided by Cochrane principles and methods, examined the extant research in countries throughout the world, published from 2003 to 2016, related to the best practices to engage communities in preparing for and responding to emergency events with public health implications. Although few studies directly examined which strategies or tactics effectively engage public participation, many studies reinforced the importance of community participation. The findings support the perspective ...


Crisis Information Seeking And Sharing (Ciss): Scale Development For Measuring Publics’ Communicative Behavior In Social-Mediated Public Health Crises, Yen-I Lee, Yan Jin Mar 2019

Crisis Information Seeking And Sharing (Ciss): Scale Development For Measuring Publics’ Communicative Behavior In Social-Mediated Public Health Crises, Yen-I Lee, Yan Jin

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

This study first refines the conceptual framework of publics’ communicative behavior in social mediated health crises. Then two multiple-item scales for measuring publics’ health crisis information seeking and sharing (CISS) are developed and tested by employing online survey data sets from a random national sample of 279 adults and 280 adults in the United States, respectively. Results indicate seven types of crisis information seeking behavior and 17 types of crisis information sharing behavior crossing over platforms, channels, and information sources. The CISS scales provide a valid and reliable tool for crisis communication researchers and practitioners to measure publics’ information seeking ...


Editor's Essay: The Critical Need For Crisis And Risk Communication Research, Brooke F. Liu Mar 2019

Editor's Essay: The Critical Need For Crisis And Risk Communication Research, Brooke F. Liu

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Risk and crisis communication are growing areas of scholarship ripe for multidisciplinary contributions. In this essay, the Volume 2 editor reflects on the primary purpose of the Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research and the areas of scholarship the journal promotes. The editor offers advice for researchers and professionals interested in publishing in the journal. Additionally, the editor calls for the community to continue to submit their best research and to support the development of the next generation of risk and crisis communication scholars.


Run, Hide, Fight: Leveraging Academics To Enhance Emergency Preparedness Training For Active Shooter Events, Andrew S. Pyle, S. Paul Gennett, Darren L. Linvill Jan 2019

Run, Hide, Fight: Leveraging Academics To Enhance Emergency Preparedness Training For Active Shooter Events, Andrew S. Pyle, S. Paul Gennett, Darren L. Linvill

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

College and university campuses are regularly faced with various types of crises. One category of crisis that is becoming a more regular event of concern is the active shooter event. Trainings exist that can help individuals respond more confidently in the event of an active shooter incident on campus. However, the authors were concerned that students with certain personality traits may be less likely to abide by active shooter training guidelines. We surveyed undergraduate students and compared the Big Five personality traits with perceptions of self and response efficacy related to the “Run, Hide, Fight” active shooter training video. Our ...


What Influences Our Decision To Vaccinate? The Social Amplification Of Risk Framework And Vaccination, Laura B. Carper Jan 2019

What Influences Our Decision To Vaccinate? The Social Amplification Of Risk Framework And Vaccination, Laura B. Carper

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

The current study applies the social amplification risk framework to the anti-vaccination movement, specifically to the social factors that influence the likelihood to vaccinate. A total of 264 participants were recruited using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk engine and students from a large southern university. Participants responded to questions about their personal, friend, and family experiences with vaccines, their discussion about vaccines, and trust in vaccine literature (CDC, Facebook, family, etc.). Lastly, participants responded to a modified Duke’s social support scale. Results indicated that the likelihood to vaccinate is impacted by several social factors and that those factors can be ...


Deaf Mis-Interpretation During Hurricane Irma: A Case Study And Evaluation, Sherilyn D. Burris Jan 2019

Deaf Mis-Interpretation During Hurricane Irma: A Case Study And Evaluation, Sherilyn D. Burris

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

In 2017, Manatee County Government (Florida, USA) used an untrained sign language interpreter during a media briefing on Hurricane Irma evacuation orders. The individual signed incorrectly, resulting in confusion for the community and embarrassment for the organization. This case study presents the background of accessible information in crisis management -- why and how disaster preparedness information is interpreted for the deaf community; provides the event's consequences, as well as local and global implications; and discusses ways to incorporate deaf and hard-of-hearing stakeholders and groups into existing structures and programs.


Health Risk Tolerance As A Key Determinant Of (Un)Willingness To Behavior Change: Conceptualization And Scale Development, Hyoyeun Jun, Yan Jin Jan 2019

Health Risk Tolerance As A Key Determinant Of (Un)Willingness To Behavior Change: Conceptualization And Scale Development, Hyoyeun Jun, Yan Jin

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

After the study of testing determinants of risk tolerance affecting information sharing, this study was conducted as a second step to actually develop the scale for risk tolerance. Firstly, this study followed qualitative steps, such as in-depth interview and focus group, to capture how public describes the situation when they are tolerating the risk, when they knew what the recommended behavior is to relieve the risk. Secondly, this study collected 1000 U.S. public sample for the survey questionnaire that are the items generated from the qualitative steps.


Tweeting To Prepare: An Examination Of Government And Organizational Messages During National Preparedness Month, Jenna L. Currie-Mueller Jan 2019

Tweeting To Prepare: An Examination Of Government And Organizational Messages During National Preparedness Month, Jenna L. Currie-Mueller

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

Each year, disasters have devastating consequences in the United States. Consequences are long term and extend beyond the disaster’s immediate impact area. Establishing a culture of preparedness is necessary for the U.S. A prepared populace responds more effectively to disasters and is less stressful on community infrastructure and resources during the response phase. One of the ways government organizations and non-government organizations can encourage preparedness actions is via social media. This study examined preparedness messages existing independently of an emerging event disseminated on Twitter by government and non-government organizations. A total of 6,374 tweets were analyzed from ...


The Role Of Risk Tolerance In Publics’ Health Risk Perception And Responses, Hyoyeun Jun, Yen-I Lee Jan 2019

The Role Of Risk Tolerance In Publics’ Health Risk Perception And Responses, Hyoyeun Jun, Yen-I Lee

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

To better understand how uncertainty influences publics’ risk perception and responses, this study introduced risk tolerance as a new concept to public relations literature and then investigated how publics react to health risks with different temporal distances: climate change and foodborne illness. Through an online survey, this study found out that uncertainty, induced by risk temporal distance, leads to varied risk tolerance, which subsequently influences where and how people seek and share risk information.


Understanding Flu Vaccination Acceptance Among U.S. Adults: The Health Belief Model And Media Sources, Tong Xie, Connor Grady, Michael Cacciatore, Glen Nowak Jan 2019

Understanding Flu Vaccination Acceptance Among U.S. Adults: The Health Belief Model And Media Sources, Tong Xie, Connor Grady, Michael Cacciatore, Glen Nowak

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

Based on previous studies about the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the reinforcing relationship between media selectivity or preference and individual’s behavior, this study used a national representative adult sample to assess flu vaccination as the result of an appraisal of relevant health beliefs, trust towards the authoritative entities (e.g. CDC & FDA) and vaccine-related media information, in addition to one’s existing behavior pattern. Results showed that not-vaccinated individuals differ significantly in their vaccine-related health believes and the trust towards the authoritative information sources. This group acquired less recommendation from health care providers and more negative sentiments about ...


Perceptions Of Risk Of Health Disparities Amid Previously Identified Political Corruption And Ageism In Slovakia, Marta N. Lukacovic, Deborah D. Sellnow-Richmond, Monika Durechova Jan 2019

Perceptions Of Risk Of Health Disparities Amid Previously Identified Political Corruption And Ageism In Slovakia, Marta N. Lukacovic, Deborah D. Sellnow-Richmond, Monika Durechova

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

This study examines the role of traditional versus new media’s impact on citizens’ perceptions of risk within elder care. We analyzed survey data from 112 Slovak citizens regarding their social network activity and perceptions of corruption, ageism, and health disparities in the Slovak elder care system. Previous research (Lukacovic, Sellnow-Richmond, & Durechova, under contract) identified three prominent sociopolitical issues present in the Slovak medical system among Slovak UGC discourse regarding Slovak healthcare inequity: corruption, threats to dignity, and discrimination. Here, we examined the extent to which social media users perceive the prevalence and subsequent risk of experiencing health disparities within ...


2019 Icrcc Proceedings Table Of Contents, Conference Organizers Jan 2019

2019 Icrcc Proceedings Table Of Contents, Conference Organizers

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

These proceedings are a representative sample of the presentations given by professional practitioners and academic scholars at the 2019 International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference (ICRCC) held March 11-13, 2019. The ICRCC is an annual event that takes place the second week in March in beautiful sunny Orlando, Florida. The conference hosts are faculty and staff from the Nicholson School of Communication. The goal of the ICRCC is to bring together prominent professional practitioners and academic scholars that work directly with crisis and risk communication on a daily basis. We define crisis and risk broadly to include, for example, natural ...


Complete Issue. Volume 1, Issue 2 Oct 2018

Complete Issue. Volume 1, Issue 2

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

This is the full issue of JICRCR Volume 1, Issue 2.


Politically Unhealthy: Flint’S Fight Against Poverty, Environmental Racism, And Dirty Water, Tomeka M. Robinson, Garrett Shum, Sabrina Singh Oct 2018

Politically Unhealthy: Flint’S Fight Against Poverty, Environmental Racism, And Dirty Water, Tomeka M. Robinson, Garrett Shum, Sabrina Singh

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

The social force of race in relation to natural resources plays a prominent role in which communities are disproportionately affected by pollution. Scholars have described how people of color are disproportionately victims of environmental discrimination and disparities because they lack the necessary social capital to bring attention to their plight, as demonstrated by the case of the Flint, Michigan, Water Crisis. In this article, we use a critical race theory lens to explore how the Flint Water Crisis constitutes a case study of environmental racism. More specifically, we discuss the public health implications of environmental racism on the residents of ...


Blurred (Identity) Lines: A Content Analysis Of The #Deleteuber Crisis On Twitter, Katharine E. Miller, Megan C. Kendall Oct 2018

Blurred (Identity) Lines: A Content Analysis Of The #Deleteuber Crisis On Twitter, Katharine E. Miller, Megan C. Kendall

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Social media have established a growing prevalence and influence in social change, in political movements, and as vehicles for messages related to crisis. The movement #deleteuber demonstrated this growing trend. Using quantitative content analysis, 2,000 tweets posted on Twitter were analyzed in the 2 weeks following the incident to measure how media framing may impact organizational identity. Findings reveal that users on Twitter largely framed the crisis as political, opinionated, and episodic in nature. Additionally, users most commonly associated the crisis with the organization as a collective rather than with the CEO as an individual responsible for actions prompting ...


Chaos Theory And Emergent Behavior In The West Virginia Water Crisis, Morgan C. Getchell Oct 2018

Chaos Theory And Emergent Behavior In The West Virginia Water Crisis, Morgan C. Getchell

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Chaos theory holds that systems act in unpredictable, nonlinear ways and that their behavior can only be observed, never predicted. This is an informative model for an organization in crisis. The West Virginia water contamination crisis, which began on January 9, 2014, fits the criteria of a system in chaos. This study employs a close case study method to examine this case through the lens of chaos theory and its tenets: sensitivity to initial conditions, bifurcation, fractals, strange attractors, and self-organization. In particular, close attention is paid to emergent organizations and how their embodiment of strange attractor values spurred the ...


An Idea Model Analysis Of Instructional Risk Communication In The Time Of Ebola, Deborah D. Sellnow-Richmond, Amiso M. George, Deanna D. Sellnow Mar 2018

An Idea Model Analysis Of Instructional Risk Communication In The Time Of Ebola, Deborah D. Sellnow-Richmond, Amiso M. George, Deanna D. Sellnow

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

The Ebola outbreak and its rapid spread throughout West Africa and other countries was a megacrisis that imposed numerous challenges to those communicating to nonscientific publics about the epidemic. This article examines the instructional risk messages offered in the days that followed the 2014 infection and death of Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas, Texas. More specifically, we apply the IDEA model for effective instructional risk and crisis communication embellished by exemplification theory to conduct a thematic analysis of messages offered locally (Dallas news stories and press releases), nationally (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Live Chat Twitter posts ...


Advocating A New Approach To Governing Water, Energy, And Food Security: Testing The Effects Of Message Inoculation And Conclusion Explicitness In The Case Of The Wef Nexus, Qingjiang Yao, Praphul Joshi, Chiung-Fang Chang, Chelsea Mcdonalds, Jason Tran, Willam Wheeler, Shiyue Hou Mar 2018

Advocating A New Approach To Governing Water, Energy, And Food Security: Testing The Effects Of Message Inoculation And Conclusion Explicitness In The Case Of The Wef Nexus, Qingjiang Yao, Praphul Joshi, Chiung-Fang Chang, Chelsea Mcdonalds, Jason Tran, Willam Wheeler, Shiyue Hou

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Message sidedness, including its later format inoculation, and conclusion explicitness have been identified by researchers as two prominent message factors that may influence advocating effects. Two-sided messages, which contain both supporting and opposing information about the issue, particularly those containing inoculation components that refute the negative side, are found to be more effective than one-sided messages. Messages with explicit conclusions are also found to be more persuasive than those that let the audience draw the conclusions themselves. This study tested the persuasion effectiveness of message inoculation and conclusion explicitness on a new scientific concept, the water–energy–food (WEF) nexus ...


The Health Belief Model And Preventive Measures: A Study Of The Ministry Of Health Campaign On Coronavirus In Saudi Arabia, Saud A. Alsulaiman, Terry L. Rentner Mar 2018

The Health Belief Model And Preventive Measures: A Study Of The Ministry Of Health Campaign On Coronavirus In Saudi Arabia, Saud A. Alsulaiman, Terry L. Rentner

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

As of August 2017, approximately 684 people have died in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia since the coronavirus Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) outbreak in 2012. Saudi Arabia became the leading country for the number of illnesses and deaths related to MERS-CoV, making this a health megacrisis. Early Ministry of Health (MOH) communication efforts proved ineffective and created anger, confusion, and mistrust. Changes in command, implementation of new guidelines and policies, and a health preventive campaign have been instrumental in the fight. The MOH launched the “We Can Stop It” campaign in 2015. This study shares results from a survey ...


Answering The Call For Scholarship: The Journal Of International Crisis And Risk Communication Research, Matthew W. Seeger Mar 2018

Answering The Call For Scholarship: The Journal Of International Crisis And Risk Communication Research, Matthew W. Seeger

Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research

Crisis events have the potential to create broad impacts across a variety of contexts and require multi-disciplinary approaches to understand the causes and consequences. Communication is instrumental to both the understanding and the management of risks and crises and needs to be systematically examined within these contexts. The Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research is designed to be an outlet for multi-disciplinary inquiry of communication phenomena within a wide range of crises and risks using multiple methods and perspectives.


Targeting Internal Publics During The 2014 Ebola Outbreak: An Analysis Of Kaiser Permanente’S Crisis Communication Strategy, Ingrid S. Greene, Denise P. Ferguson Jan 2018

Targeting Internal Publics During The 2014 Ebola Outbreak: An Analysis Of Kaiser Permanente’S Crisis Communication Strategy, Ingrid S. Greene, Denise P. Ferguson

International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference

Issues management in today’s quickly changing world can be complex and unpredictable, and in the case of the spread of Ebola, carry lethal implications. Kaiser Permanente (KP) faced a potential internal crisis due to the involvement of medical staff during the spread of the disease in the United States. In addition, KP needed to ensure the safety of the patients the healthcare provider serves. This case study examines how the corporate communications team at KP in Southern California communicated the necessary messages during this crisis in the U.S. in the fall of 2014. The methodology of this case ...


Nurse Perceived Barriers To Effective Nurse-Client Communication, Sara J. Brandenburg Jan 2017

Nurse Perceived Barriers To Effective Nurse-Client Communication, Sara J. Brandenburg

Honors Undergraduate Theses

Successful client care depends on effective nurse-client communication. It is essential in meeting clients' needs, providing quality care, and maximizing positive client outcomes. The intent of this thesis was to explore nurse perceived barriers to effective nurse-client communication. A literature review was conducted and nine articles were identified as addressing nurse perceived barriers to communication. Four major barriers were identified: nurse comfort and knowledge, environment, time, and culture and language. Research on interventions to address nurses' perceptions of barriers to effective nurse-client communication may provide a better understanding of communication barriers and address issues created by ineffective communication with clients.


If Our Gatekeepers Can't Function Properly, We Are Doomed, Barry Mauer May 2016

If Our Gatekeepers Can't Function Properly, We Are Doomed, Barry Mauer

UCF Forum

Andrew Wakefield, a British doctor who lost his medical license in 2010, falsely claimed in a 1998 scientific paper published in The Lancet that measles, mumps and rubella vaccines cause autism and Crohn’s disease. His claims, though bogus, were widely reported and led to a decline in vaccination rates and new outbreaks of measles and mumps.


Digital Research Cycles: How Attitudes Toward Content, Culture And Technology Affect Web Development., Edward Scott Jan 2009

Digital Research Cycles: How Attitudes Toward Content, Culture And Technology Affect Web Development., Edward Scott

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

It has been estimated that one third of the world's population does not have access to "adequate" health care. Some 1.6 billion people live in countries experiencing "concentrated" acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemics. Many countries in Africa--and other low-income countries--are in dire need of help providing adequate health care services to their citizens. They require more hands-on care from Western health workers--and training so more African health workers can eventually care for their own citizens. But these countries also need assistance acquiring and implementing both texts--the body of medical information potentially available to them--and technology--the means by ...