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Articles 61 - 90 of 91

Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Improving Patient Notification Of Solid Abdominal Viscera Incidental Findings With A Standardized Protocol, Courtney E. Collins, Nicole Cherng, Theodore P. Mcdade, Babak Movahedi, Timothy A. Emhoff, Giles F. Whalen, Jennifer Lafemina, Jon D. Dorfman Feb 2015

Improving Patient Notification Of Solid Abdominal Viscera Incidental Findings With A Standardized Protocol, Courtney E. Collins, Nicole Cherng, Theodore P. Mcdade, Babak Movahedi, Timothy A. Emhoff, Giles F. Whalen, Jennifer Lafemina, Jon D. Dorfman

Open Access Articles

BACKGROUND: The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) scans in the evaluation of trauma patients has led to increased detection of incidental radiologic findings. Incidental findings (IFs) of the abdominal viscera are among the most commonly discovered lesions and can carry a risk of malignancy. Despite this, patient notification regarding these findings is often inadequate.

METHODS: We identified patients who underwent abdominopelvic CTs as part of their trauma evaluation during a recent 1-year period (9/2011-8/2012). Patients with IFs of the kidneys, liver, adrenal glands, pancreas and/or ovaries had their charts reviewed for documentation of the lesion in ...


The Influence Of Positive And Negative Death Attitudes On Medical Students' Empathy And Attitudes Toward End-Of-Life Care, Elizabeth Palumbo Jan 2015

The Influence Of Positive And Negative Death Attitudes On Medical Students' Empathy And Attitudes Toward End-Of-Life Care, Elizabeth Palumbo

PCOM Psychology Dissertations

This quantitative study employed a cross-sectional survey research design in order to examine the relationships between medical students’ death attitudes, empathy, and attitudes toward end-of-life care. The participants were 206 medical students currently enrolled in the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine program at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia campus. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in the level of empathy between medical students who held strong positive death attitudes and medical students with strong negative death attitudes. However, results indicated that significant differences existed in attitudes toward end-of-life care between medical students who held strong positive death ...


Caregiver Perceptions Of Their Influence On Cancer Treatment Decision Making: Intersections Of Language, Identity, And Illness, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Phokeng M. Dailey, Julianne C. Wojno, Nancy Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett, Mark Dignan Jan 2015

Caregiver Perceptions Of Their Influence On Cancer Treatment Decision Making: Intersections Of Language, Identity, And Illness, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Phokeng M. Dailey, Julianne C. Wojno, Nancy Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett, Mark Dignan

Papers in Communication Studies

Serious illness of a loved one can disrupt a caregiver’s sense of self and relationships. We examined the language caregivers use to describe the cancer treatment decision making of a loved one to understand how caregivers frame their own identity relative to a patient’s illness. We analyzed transcripts from in-depth interviews conducted with caregivers (N = 58) of cancer patients to examine the intersection among language, identity, and illness. Caregivers with a patient-level personal identity frame used phrases such as their body, their decision. Caregivers with a relational identity frame used plural pronouns such as we or our when ...


Dancing Around Infertility: The Use Of Metaphors In A Complex Medical Situation, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Janice L. Krieger Jan 2015

Dancing Around Infertility: The Use Of Metaphors In A Complex Medical Situation, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Janice L. Krieger

Papers in Communication Studies

People use metaphors to cognitively frame their experiences as well as to explain those experiences to others, especially in complex medical situations. However, previous research has not fully explored the extent to which metaphors may be helpful or harmful to achieving well-being. This investigation fills this gap by identifying and explaining metaphor use in the context of infertility. Guided by self-determination theory, in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 women and men who had experienced an inability to conceive a child. Analysis of participant narratives yielded 10 prominent metaphors that reflect how participants’ need for competence, autonomy, and relatedness were (and ...


Comprehension Of Randomization And Uncertainty In Cancer Clinical Trials Decision Making Among Rural, Appalachian Patients, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Phokeng M. Dailey, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett Jan 2015

Comprehension Of Randomization And Uncertainty In Cancer Clinical Trials Decision Making Among Rural, Appalachian Patients, Janice L. Krieger, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Phokeng M. Dailey, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Electra D. Paskett

Papers in Communication Studies

Comprehension of randomization is a vital, but understudied, component of informed consent to participate incancer randomized clinical trials(RCTs). Thisstudy examines patient comprehension of the randomization process as well as sources of ongoing uncertainty that may inhibit a patient’s ability to provide informed consent to participate in RCTs. Cancer patients living in rural Appalachia who were offeredanopportunitytoparticipateinacancertreatmentRCT completed in-depth interviews and a brief survey. No systematic differences in randomization comprehension between patients who consented and those who declined participation in a cancer RCT were detected. Comprehension is conceptually distinct from uncertainty, with patients who had both high and low ...


Hearing The Patient Voice: Using Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment To Understand Teens With Cystic Fibrosis, Susan Horky Lscw, Laura E. Sherman Msw, Julie Polvinen, Michael Rich Md Nov 2014

Hearing The Patient Voice: Using Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment To Understand Teens With Cystic Fibrosis, Susan Horky Lscw, Laura E. Sherman Msw, Julie Polvinen, Michael Rich Md

Patient Experience Journal

This qualitative study asked two questions: 1) How do teens with cystic fibrosis (CF) feel about their treatments; and 2) What factors lead teens to adhere, or not adhere, to treatments. To answer these questions we used an innovative approach (Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment or VIA), to learn about the experiences of teens with CF. We loaned video camcorders to teens with CF and asked them to create visual narratives of their lives. Researchers logged and coded videotapes, identifying themes that arose from the material. A primary theme was “Doctors don’t understand.” Participants also highlighted the value of routines ...


Assessing Technologies For Information-Seeking On Prostate Cancer Screening By Low-Income Men, Susan W. Mcroy, Emily M. Cramer, Hayeon Song Nov 2014

Assessing Technologies For Information-Seeking On Prostate Cancer Screening By Low-Income Men, Susan W. Mcroy, Emily M. Cramer, Hayeon Song

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

Purpose: This paper presents a multipart investigation of the benefits and challenges in deploying automated question-answering as an alternative to web-based searching to provide information about prostate cancer screening for low-income men age 40 years and older.

Methods: The study comprised: 1) a survey assessing current use of the Internet, mobile phones and texting; 2) a controlled observational study of both web-based searching and automated question-answering for information about prostate cancer; and 3) a formative field study in which subjects interacted with a health department nurse using text messages.

Results: Survey results suggest the target population has greater access to ...


Systematic Review Of The Use Of Online Questionnaires Of Older Adults, Meegan Remillard, Kathleen Mazor, Sarah Cutrona, Jerry Gurwitz, Jennifer Tjia Nov 2014

Systematic Review Of The Use Of Online Questionnaires Of Older Adults, Meegan Remillard, Kathleen Mazor, Sarah Cutrona, Jerry Gurwitz, Jennifer Tjia

Jennifer Tjia

OBJECTIVES: To describe methodological approaches to population targeting and sampling and to summarize limitations of Internet-based questionnaires in older adults.

DESIGN: Systematic literature review.

SETTING: Studies using online questionnaires in older adult populations.

PARTICIPANTS: English-language articles using search terms for geriatric, age 65 and over, Internet survey, online survey, Internet questionnaire, and online questionnaire in PubMed and EBSCO host between 1984 and July 2012. Inclusion criteria were study population mean age 65 and older and use of an online questionnaire for research. Review of 336 abstracts yielded 14 articles for full review by two investigators; 11 articles met inclusion criteria ...


Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish Nov 2014

Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish

Jason Karlawish

No abstract provided.


Neglected Or Non-Compliant? Assessing The Difficulties Of Tuberculosis Patients In Salvador-Ba, Brazil, Erin Slatery Oct 2014

Neglected Or Non-Compliant? Assessing The Difficulties Of Tuberculosis Patients In Salvador-Ba, Brazil, Erin Slatery

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Objective: The aim of this study is to analyze how Instituto Brasileiro para Investigação da Tuberculose (IBIT), a philanthropic tuberculosis clinic in Salvador, Brazil, maintains treatment abandonment rates much lower than those of surrounding public clinics. This study also aims to evaluate how professionals conceptualize and address the difficulties faced by patients.

Methods: Interviews were conducted with 8 IBIT professionals and 16 patients in treatment for tuberculosis in the aforementioned institution via semi-structured and structured questionnaires, respectively. Participant observation guided the analysis of relationships between patients and professionals.

Results: Patients found varying aspects of treatment difficult depending on personal circumstances ...


Barriers And Facilitators For Colorectal Cancer Screening Practices In The Latino Community: Perspectives From Community Leaders, Ana Natale-Pereira, Jonnie Marks, Marielos Vega, Dawne Mouzon, Shawna Hudson, Debbie Salas-Lopez Sep 2014

Barriers And Facilitators For Colorectal Cancer Screening Practices In The Latino Community: Perspectives From Community Leaders, Ana Natale-Pereira, Jonnie Marks, Marielos Vega, Dawne Mouzon, Shawna Hudson, Debbie Salas-Lopez

Debbie Salas-Lopez MD, MPH

BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among Latinos. While Latinos represent one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups in the United States, their participation in cancer prevention and treatment trials is low. METHODS: Thirty-six Latino community leaders participated in five focus groups that examined factors affecting CRC screening practices among Latinos. RESULTS: The top four barriers identified were low knowledge and awareness of CRC, language barriers, lack of insurance, and undocumented legal status. Additional barriers included seeking health care only when sick, fatalism, fear, denial ...


The Capus Project-Innovative Solutions For Hiv/Aids Linkage To Care, Melanie Gwynn, Jamila Ealey, Kate Racoff Musgrove Sep 2014

The Capus Project-Innovative Solutions For Hiv/Aids Linkage To Care, Melanie Gwynn, Jamila Ealey, Kate Racoff Musgrove

7th Annual Rural HIV Research and Training Conference

“The CAPUS Project-Innovative Solutions for HIV/AIDS Linkage to Care”

Objectives: 1) Expand knowledge of the current linkage to care landscape within Georgia; 2) Identify essential components of the Resource Hub to enhance linkage to care efforts throughout Georgia; and 3)Promote effective use of the Resource Hub to facilitate HIV/AIDS linkage to care within highly impacted communities


Physicians' Attitudes About Recommending Surgery For Early Stage Lung Cancer And Possible Reasons For Racial Disparities, Franklin R. Mcguire Sep 2014

Physicians' Attitudes About Recommending Surgery For Early Stage Lung Cancer And Possible Reasons For Racial Disparities, Franklin R. Mcguire

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

PHYSICIANS’ ATTITUDES ABOUT RECOMMENDING SURGERY FOR EARLY STAGE LUNG CANCER AND POSSIBLE REASONS FOR RACIAL DISPARITIES

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Patient refusal for lung cancer surgery is significant, but other factors, such as negative framing of the treatment discussion, may be involved. Physician attitudes could influence the nuances of and therefore the conclusions of these discussions. We determined physicians’ attitudes and the influence it has on possible decisions against lung cancer surgery, particularly surgical rates for blacks, using a companion survey.

Methods: The study is a prospective, multicenter observational trial conducted at five sites in North and South Carolina from December 2005 ...


Accessing Healthcare: The Experience Of Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders In Maine, Alan Kurtz, Angie Schickle, Margaret Carr, Marnie Bragdon-Morneault, Susan Russell, Debra Rainey, Jill Downs, Nancy Cronin Jun 2014

Accessing Healthcare: The Experience Of Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders In Maine, Alan Kurtz, Angie Schickle, Margaret Carr, Marnie Bragdon-Morneault, Susan Russell, Debra Rainey, Jill Downs, Nancy Cronin

Health and Well-Being

Previous research has revealed that children and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are significantly more likely to have both unmet healthcare needs than those with other disabilities. In addition, they are more likely to have difficulty accessing primary or specialized medical care. Minority status, living in a rural location, and low income can exacerbate these disparities. Other obstacles to effective healthcare for individuals with ASD include the following: (1) severity of symptoms associated with ASD; (2) lack of knowledge or skill by medical practitioners; (3) lack of access to comprehensive healthcare supports or a medical home; and (4) lack ...


The National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey [Hints]: A National Cross-Sectional Analysis Of Talking To Your Doctor And Other Healthcare Providers For Health Information, Julie E. Volkman, Tana M. Luger, Kimberly L.L. Harvey, Timothy P. Hogan, Stephanie L. Shimada, Daniel J. Amante, D. Keith Mcinnes, Hua Feng, Thomas K. Houston Jun 2014

The National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey [Hints]: A National Cross-Sectional Analysis Of Talking To Your Doctor And Other Healthcare Providers For Health Information, Julie E. Volkman, Tana M. Luger, Kimberly L.L. Harvey, Timothy P. Hogan, Stephanie L. Shimada, Daniel J. Amante, D. Keith Mcinnes, Hua Feng, Thomas K. Houston

Open Access Articles

BACKGROUND: The need to understand preferred sources of health information remains important to providing patient-centered care. The Internet remains a popular resource for health information, but more traditional sources may still be valid for patients during a recent health need. This study sought to understand the characteristics of patients that turn to their doctor or healthcare provider first for a recent health or medical information need.

METHODS: Using the national cross-sectional survey, Health Information National Trend Study [HINTS], characteristics of those who sought a doctor or healthcare provider for a recent health information need were compared to other sources. Weighted ...


Community Engagement As A Process And An Outcome Of Developing Culturally Grounded Health Communication Interventions: An Example From The Decide Project, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Jessica Krok, Phokeng M. Dailey, Linda Kight, Janice L. Krieger Jan 2014

Community Engagement As A Process And An Outcome Of Developing Culturally Grounded Health Communication Interventions: An Example From The Decide Project, Angela L. Palmer-Wackerly, Jessica Krok, Phokeng M. Dailey, Linda Kight, Janice L. Krieger

Papers in Communication Studies

Community engagement is a process often used in developing effective health communication interventions, especially in traditionally underserved cultural contexts. While the potentially positive outcomes of community engagement are well established, the communication processes that result in engagement with cultural groups are less apparent. The focus on the outcomes of engagement at the expense of describing how engagement occurs makes it difficult for methods to be improved upon and replicated by future studies. The purpose of the current manuscript is to illustrate the process of achieving community engagement through the development of a culturally grounded health communication intervention. We offer practical ...


Health Literacy And Complementary And Alternative Medicine Use Among Underserved Inpatients In A Safety Net Hospital, Paula Gardiner, Suzanne Mitchell, Amanda C. Filippelli, Ekaterina Sadikova, Laura F. White, Michael K. Paasche-Orlow, Brian W. Jack Dec 2013

Health Literacy And Complementary And Alternative Medicine Use Among Underserved Inpatients In A Safety Net Hospital, Paula Gardiner, Suzanne Mitchell, Amanda C. Filippelli, Ekaterina Sadikova, Laura F. White, Michael K. Paasche-Orlow, Brian W. Jack

Center for Integrated Primary Care Publications

Little is known about the relationship between health literacy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in low-income racially diverse patients. The authors conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from 581 participants enrolled in the Re-Engineered Discharge clinical trial. The authors assessed sociodemographic characteristics, CAM use, and health literacy. They used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression to test the association of health literacy with four patterns of CAM use. Of the 581 participants, 50% reported using any CAM, 28% used provider-delivered CAM therapies, 27% used relaxation techniques, and 21% used herbal medicine. Of those with higher health literacy, 55 ...


Coping With Pediatric Cancer: Conversational Methods Utilized By Parents And Children When Dealing With Pediatric Cancer, Chelsi Morgan Walls Aug 2013

Coping With Pediatric Cancer: Conversational Methods Utilized By Parents And Children When Dealing With Pediatric Cancer, Chelsi Morgan Walls

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This study analyzed how people perceived parents should communicate with their child regarding pediatric cancer treatments. When dealing with pediatric cancer, it is vital that parents and their child communicate about the illness in order to effectively cope with the cancer. Using Uncertainty Management Theory, appraisals, inferences, and illusions, are examined in this study to discover how much affect-management and buffering would be used to manage the illness. Under UMT, the coping mechanisms of affect-management (i.e., religious coping and behavioral disengagement), and buffering (avoidance and child distraction) depend upon how individuals appraise the uncertain situation (positive vs. negative), the ...


Metaphor Use In Interpersonal Communication Of Body Perception In The Context Of Breast Cancer, Jennifer Mary Fillion Jul 2013

Metaphor Use In Interpersonal Communication Of Body Perception In The Context Of Breast Cancer, Jennifer Mary Fillion

Dissertations and Theses

Female breast cancer patients are often confused, frustrated, and devastated by changes occurring in their bodies and the treatment process. Many women express frustration and concern with the inability to know what the next phases of their life will bring. Previous research also states that many women struggle to communicate with others about treatment as well as side effects. This research examined how woman are use metaphors to describe their experience with breast cancer, specifically throughout the treatment period related to body image struggles. I qualitatively conducted interviews with women who were either currently in treatment or just finishing. My ...


Pass This Message Along: Self-Edited Email Messages Promoting Colon Cancer Screening Among Friends And Family, Sarah L. Cutrona, Joann L. Wagner, Douglas W. Roblin, Bridget Gaglio, Andrew E. Williams, Rosalie A. Torres Stone, Kathleen M. Mazor May 2013

Pass This Message Along: Self-Edited Email Messages Promoting Colon Cancer Screening Among Friends And Family, Sarah L. Cutrona, Joann L. Wagner, Douglas W. Roblin, Bridget Gaglio, Andrew E. Williams, Rosalie A. Torres Stone, Kathleen M. Mazor

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Encouraging communication within a social network may promote uptake of desired medical services or health behaviors. Little is known about the use of this approach to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We conducted in-person interviews with 438 insured adults ages 42-73 in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia.

Participants were shown a sample message in which the sender shares that he has completed a colonoscopy and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. We asked participants to edit the message to create one they would be willing to send to friends and family via email or postcard. Changes to ...


Governing Occupation Through Constructions Of Risk: The Case Of The Aging Driver, Silke Dennhardt Apr 2013

Governing Occupation Through Constructions Of Risk: The Case Of The Aging Driver, Silke Dennhardt

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Risk and risk-management have become increasingly pervasive features of modern society and governmentality scholars have highlighted various ways risk discourses are taken up to govern citizens and their everyday conduct. Thus, attending to risk is imperative to advance an understanding of how everyday occupation is shaped and governed within contemporary society. Within this study, the example of driving in later life is drawn upon to address two objectives: 1. to advance the understanding of how risk is taken up to govern everyday occupation, and 2. to explicate how risk is taken up in discourses to constitute particular subjectivities and their ...


Coping With Pediatric Cancer: Conversational Methods Utilized By Parents And Children When Dealing With Pediatric Cancer, Chelsi Morgan Walls Apr 2013

Coping With Pediatric Cancer: Conversational Methods Utilized By Parents And Children When Dealing With Pediatric Cancer, Chelsi Morgan Walls

Graduate Research Symposium (GCUA) (2010 - 2017)

This thesis sought to analyze how parents communicate with their child regarding pediatric cancer treatments. When dealing with pediatric cancer, it is vital that parents and their child communicate about the illness in order to effectively cope with the cancer. Using Uncertainty Management Theory, along with sub-concepts of the theory (i.e., appraisals, inferences, and illusions), this thesis sought to discover which coping mechanism (i.e., affect-management or buffering) would be chosen to manage the illness. Under UMT, appraisals were assessed, resulting in positive and negative appraisal, which indicated whether the individual handled the issue with either an inference based ...


Analysis United Kingdom And United States Healthcare, Joyce K. Kutin Jan 2013

Analysis United Kingdom And United States Healthcare, Joyce K. Kutin

Joyce K Kutin RN, MSN, MOL

United Kingdom and the United States are two dissimilar health systems each having uniquely differing focuses, where the primary differences are a parliamentary verses a republic government application toward the socioeconomic requirements of the populace. The United Kingdom’s National Health Service interprets health care as a public service rather than the commodity. The United States healthcare system is riddled with disparities regarding quality, access and cost. The socioeconomic poor and or homeless are less likely to utilize the healthcare system when compared to others who are more fortunate. Health care systems are facing the same challenges around the world ...


The Impact Of The Internet On The Sexual Health Of Adolescents: A Brief Review, Julia Springate, Hatim A. Omar Jan 2013

The Impact Of The Internet On The Sexual Health Of Adolescents: A Brief Review, Julia Springate, Hatim A. Omar

Pediatrics Faculty Publications

The object of this review is to summarize the impact of the Internet on the sexual health of adolescents. This article examines the use of websites, blogs and chat rooms as sources for sexual health information for adolescents. The influence of Internet pornography on sexual behaviors and attitudes is addressed. The use of the Internet as a place to find sexual partners is also assessed. During a time of great physical, emotional and sexual change, the Internet is playing a huge role in the decisions adolescents are making, both positive and negative.


Sick With Fear: Popular Challenges To Scientific Authority In The Vaccine Controversies Of The 21st Century, Ellen Watkins Mar 2012

Sick With Fear: Popular Challenges To Scientific Authority In The Vaccine Controversies Of The 21st Century, Ellen Watkins

Annual Undergraduate Conference on Health and Society

In the 20th century, vaccines were heralded as one of the greatest medical inventions in history. In the late 1990’s, however, the myth of vaccine-caused autism caught fire. Despite mountains of evidence disproving the link, panicking Americans eschewed vaccines and turned against their physicians. Why did Americans turn their backs on doctors, scientists, and the health industry? This paper follows the vaccine controversy of the last thirty years, looking in particular at the relationship between science and the media. This paper analyzes the contrast between discussion of the hypothesized link in scientific circles and in popular news sources, seeking ...


Physical Activity And Cognitive-Health Content In Top-Circulating Magazines, 2006–2008, Anna E. Greer, Sara J. Corwin, Daniela B. Friedman Jan 2011

Physical Activity And Cognitive-Health Content In Top-Circulating Magazines, 2006–2008, Anna E. Greer, Sara J. Corwin, Daniela B. Friedman

All PTHMS Faculty Publications

Physical activity may promote cognitive health in older adults. Popular media play an important role in preventive health communication. This study examined articles discussing associations between physical activity and cognitive health in top-circulating magazines targeting older adults. 42,753 pages of magazines published from 2006 to 2008 were reviewed; 26 articles met inclusion criteria. Explanations regarding the link between physical activity and cognitive health were provided in 57.7% of articles. These explanations were generally consistent with empirical evidence; however, few articles included empirical evidence. Physical activity recommendations were presented in 80.8% of articles; a wide range was recommended ...


From Go To Woe: Family Member’S Stories Of Adolescents And Young People Living With And Dying From Cancer, Janet Anne Barling Jan 2011

From Go To Woe: Family Member’S Stories Of Adolescents And Young People Living With And Dying From Cancer, Janet Anne Barling

Theses

The purpose of this thesis is to uncover, through families telling their stories, the experience of family members following the diagnosis, treatment, dying and death of an adolescent or young adult (AYA) family member. The decision to undertake this research was related to the lack of treatment, support and research for AYAs with cancer (CanTeen, 2005; Ewing, 2005), life stage issues for adolescents and their families (Grinyer, 2002a, 2007a, 2007b, 2008, 2009), and the researcher’s own position as a mother whose adolescent son had died of cancer.

Given the sensitive nature of the research study and the researcher’s ...


Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish Nov 2010

Desktop Medicine, Jason Karlawish

Center for Bioethics Papers

No abstract provided.


Roundtable On The National Health Security Strategy And At‐Risk Individuals, Behavioral Health, And Community Resilience, Daniel B. Fagbuyi, +Conference Participants Oct 2010

Roundtable On The National Health Security Strategy And At‐Risk Individuals, Behavioral Health, And Community Resilience, Daniel B. Fagbuyi, +Conference Participants

GW mHealth Collaborative

No abstract provided.


Culture, Language, And The Doctor-Patient Relationship, Warren J. Ferguson, Lucy M. Candib May 2002

Culture, Language, And The Doctor-Patient Relationship, Warren J. Ferguson, Lucy M. Candib

Family Medicine and Community Health Publications and Presentations

BACKGROUND: This review's goal was to determine how differences between physicians and patients in race, ethnicity and language influence the quality of the physician-patient relationship.

METHODS: We performed a literature review to assess existing evidence for ethnic and racial disparities in the quality of doctor-patient communication and the doctor-patient relationship.

RESULTS: We found consistent evidence that race, ethnicity; and language have substantial influence on the quality of the doctor-patient relationship. Minority patients, especially those not proficient in English, are less likely to engender empathic response from physicians, establish rapport with physicians, receive sufficient information, and be encouraged to participate ...