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Health Communication Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Health Literacy-Listening Skill And Patient Questions Following Cancer Prevention And Screening Discussions, Kathleen M. Mazor, Donald L. Rubin, Douglas W. Roblin, Andrew E. Williams, Paul K. J. Han, Bridget Gaglio, Sarah L. Cutrona, Mary E. Costanza, Joann L. Wagner Aug 2016

Health Literacy-Listening Skill And Patient Questions Following Cancer Prevention And Screening Discussions, Kathleen M. Mazor, Donald L. Rubin, Douglas W. Roblin, Andrew E. Williams, Paul K. J. Han, Bridget Gaglio, Sarah L. Cutrona, Mary E. Costanza, Joann L. Wagner

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

OBJECTIVE: Patient question-asking is essential to shared decision making. We sought to describe patients' questions when faced with cancer prevention and screening decisions, and to explore differences in question-asking as a function of health literacy with respect to spoken information (health literacy-listening).

METHODS: Four-hundred and thirty-three (433) adults listened to simulated physician-patient interactions discussing (i) prophylactic tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention, (ii) PSA testing for prostate cancer and (iii) colorectal cancer screening, and identified questions they would have. Health literacy-listening was assessed using the Cancer Message Literacy Test-Listening (CMLT-Listening). Two authors developed a coding scheme, which was applied to all ...


Colorectal Cancer Prevention: Perspectives Of Key Players From Social Networks In A Low-Income Rural Us Region, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Kathryn Eddens, Adam Jonas, Claire Snell-Rood, Christina R. Studts, Benjamin Broder-Oldach, Mira L. Katz Feb 2016

Colorectal Cancer Prevention: Perspectives Of Key Players From Social Networks In A Low-Income Rural Us Region, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Kathryn Eddens, Adam Jonas, Claire Snell-Rood, Christina R. Studts, Benjamin Broder-Oldach, Mira L. Katz

Behavioral Science Faculty Publications

Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, “key players” often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure ...