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Full-Text Articles in Health Communication

Drill Emergency Simulation As An Increase In Information And Skills Of Midwives In Carrying Out Assistance To Mothers And Newborns A Case Study In Karawang Regional Hospital, Siti Nursanti, Susanne Dida, Irvan Afriandi, Mien Hidayat Nov 2019

Drill Emergency Simulation As An Increase In Information And Skills Of Midwives In Carrying Out Assistance To Mothers And Newborns A Case Study In Karawang Regional Hospital, Siti Nursanti, Susanne Dida, Irvan Afriandi, Mien Hidayat

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

Health professional’s skillin helping maternal emergency cases isa critical factor contributing to maternal and sudden infant death. Expanding Maternal and Neonatal Survival programs, therefore,initiateda training so-called emergency drill simulation. This research aims to find the effectivity of midwiferycommunication strategy in the emergency drill simulation forsharpening partnership and expertise of the midwifery in a groupdealing with childbirth emergency. This research uses qualitative methodand a case study as an approach. The informants of this research are the head division of customer care, head of the delivery room, and the paramedic mentor of Expanding Maternal Neonatal Survival in Karawang Regional Hospital ...


Promoting Support For Public Health Policies Through Mediated Contact: Can Narrator Perspective And Self-Disclosure Curb In-Group Favoritism?, Riva Tukachinsky, Emily Brogan-Freitas, Tessa Urbanovich Jan 2019

Promoting Support For Public Health Policies Through Mediated Contact: Can Narrator Perspective And Self-Disclosure Curb In-Group Favoritism?, Riva Tukachinsky, Emily Brogan-Freitas, Tessa Urbanovich

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

An online 2 × 2 factorial experiment (N = 203) examined the effect of parasocial contact on support for public health policies in the context of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that because of an intergroup dynamic, individuals are less likely to engage with an outgroup character than an in-group character featured in a news magazine article. Results support the in-group favoritism hypothesis. The study examines two narrative devices for overcoming this tendency: the narrator’s perspective and amount of insight into the character’s inner world through character self-disclosure. We find support for the narrator perspective but not for the self-disclosure effect ...