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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication

Choosing The Best: A Rhetorical Analysis And Discussion Of An Abstinence-Centered Sexuality Education Curriculum, Carolyn Buonomo Apr 2017

Choosing The Best: A Rhetorical Analysis And Discussion Of An Abstinence-Centered Sexuality Education Curriculum, Carolyn Buonomo

Master of Arts in Professional Writing Capstones

This rhetorical analysis examines Choosing the Best Journey, a Choosing the Best, LLC student manual targeted at ninth and tenth grade students, and testimonials from the company’s website to provide insight about the ways in which the company’s curricula position women. In what way does this content position women in relation to men? Does the curriculum position women as those who both hold the responsibility for preventing and bearing the burden of premarital sexual activity? In what ways does this content work to reinforce gender stereotypes? By answering these questions, I am able to determine whether the curriculum ...


Informe De Conferencia Maya- Pdf En Español, Alan Lebaron Nov 2016

Informe De Conferencia Maya- Pdf En Español, Alan Lebaron

Maya Heritage Community Project Texts

Memoria de la Conferencia; Noviembre 2016 en el local de Mesa, AZ


Maya Conference Report - Pdf In English, Alan Lebaron Nov 2016

Maya Conference Report - Pdf In English, Alan Lebaron

Maya Heritage Community Project Texts

Remembering the conference; on November 2016 in Mesa, AZ


The Price Of Strength: Black College Women's Perspectives On The Strong Black Woman Stereotype, Lindsey M. West, Roxanne A. Donovan, Amanda R. Daniel Mar 2016

The Price Of Strength: Black College Women's Perspectives On The Strong Black Woman Stereotype, Lindsey M. West, Roxanne A. Donovan, Amanda R. Daniel

Faculty Publications

Black feminist scholars posit that the Strong Black Woman stereotype (SBW) is a compelling image that depicts Black women as strong, independent, and self-sacrificing. Research suggests SBW internalization is related to mental and physical health problems. This study asked Black college women open-ended questions on several SBW-related topics. Thematic analysis of approximately 90 participants revealed definitions of SBW, including, strong, independent, hardworking, and caring. Contrary to SBW’s positive perception, the majority of participants reported SBW’s negative effects on their health, highlighting SBW’s paradox. Findings increase awareness of the SBW stereotype for mental health professionals who work with ...


Perfect Timing: The Rise Of Women’S Political Leadership During Cultural Shifts, Christie E. Pearce May 2014

Perfect Timing: The Rise Of Women’S Political Leadership During Cultural Shifts, Christie E. Pearce

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

America has fallen behind in women's leadership, especially in politics. In the approaching era, there will be more viable female political candidates than ever in the past, but will the public be prepared to elect a woman to high office? Studies suggest that mentalities toward female leadership have taken a shift in a positive direction. The idea of what an 'ideal' politician must offer is more feminine in the modern era than ever before. In the age of social media, female politicians have opportunities to reach more constituents through social media in a more effective way than has been ...


Women As Subject And Audience In World War Ii Venereal Disease Posters, Kyra Whitton Dec 2010

Women As Subject And Audience In World War Ii Venereal Disease Posters, Kyra Whitton

Dissertations, Theses and Capstone Projects

Internationally, venereal disease first became a major health concern during World War I. Venereal diseases were some of the most common infections and led to more hospitalizations among soldiers than wounds or battle-related illness. The Selective Service discovered that almost fifteen percent of those who were eligible for the draft were already infected with a venereal disease, sparking an intense anti-venereal disease campaign across America. Red-light districts were shut down, and American cities sought new laws that would criminalize prostitution to protect young men from contracting a venereal infection.

Though venereal disease rates were still high during World War II ...