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Full-Text Articles in Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication

Journal Of Pedagogy, Pluralism And Practice, Volume I (3), Fall 1998 (Full Issue), Journal Staff Jan 1998

Journal Of Pedagogy, Pluralism And Practice, Volume I (3), Fall 1998 (Full Issue), Journal Staff

Journal of Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice

No abstract provided.


Envisioning A Capstone Course In Communication: The View From A Departmental Armchair, William J. Seiler Jan 1998

Envisioning A Capstone Course In Communication: The View From A Departmental Armchair, William J. Seiler

Papers in Communication Studies

For many departments, the need to develop an assessment package has been the driving force in the consideration of adding a capstone course to their communication curricula. But there are other reasons to justify the creation of such a course. In general, the capstone course has been described by some as a course in which students are required to integrate diverse bodies of knowledge to solve a problem or formulate a policy of societal importance. The dictionary describes a capstone as the “final or crowning part.” That may be a bit presumptuous, but it illustrates the notion of what most ...


Themes That Thread Through Society: Racism And Athletic Manifestation In The African-American Community, Keith Harrison Dec 1997

Themes That Thread Through Society: Racism And Athletic Manifestation In The African-American Community, Keith Harrison

Dr. C. Keith Harrison

The purpose of this article is to examine and critically analyze the impact of sport in the African-American community. This critique of the social and behavioral outcomes of sport in the African-American community will include philosophical, historical, and sociological inquiry most affecting the plight of the African-American male in academics and athletics. Data on the perceptions of contemporary African-American men participating in sport in higher education will also add more support to the conclusion that race and sport are socially constructed in society.