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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges May 2015

The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges

Kenneth M. Ames

The Bear Creek site in Redmond, Washington, yields important information about settlement, subsistence, and technology in the Puget Lowland during the late Pleistocene–Holocene transition. The lithic assemblage is dominated by expedient flake technology, but also contains bifaces and retouched tools. Ongoing analyses focus on site formation, procurement strategies of lithic raw materials, production of flake tools, and technological comparisons of Bear Creek stemmed and concave-base points with other Paleoarchaic technologies of western North America


The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges Jan 2015

The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

The Bear Creek site in Redmond, Washington, yields important information about settlement, subsistence, and technology in the Puget Lowland during the late Pleistocene–Holocene transition. The lithic assemblage is dominated by expedient flake technology, but also contains bifaces and retouched tools. Ongoing analyses focus on site formation, procurement strategies of lithic raw materials, production of flake tools, and technological comparisons of Bear Creek stemmed and concave-base points with other Paleoarchaic technologies of western North America


Sedentism: A Temporal Shift Or A Transitional Change In Hunter-Gatherer Mobility Patterns?, Kenneth M. Ames Sep 2014

Sedentism: A Temporal Shift Or A Transitional Change In Hunter-Gatherer Mobility Patterns?, Kenneth M. Ames

Kenneth M. Ames

Archaeologists widely perceive sedentism as a necessary precondition for social elaboration and complexity among hunter-gatherers. The origins and causes of sedentism are major archaeological research problems, and researchers concern themselves with the transition between nomadism and sedentism. In this paper I argue that there is only variation in residential patterns, which may include sedentism; that sedentism, however it is defined, is not a stable residential pattern among hunter-gatherers; and that, rather than explain the causes of sedentism, one must explain shifts in residential mobility patterns. The case study illustrating these points is drawn from the dry interior region of the ...


Sedentism: A Temporal Shift Or A Transitional Change In Hunter-Gatherer Mobility Patterns?, Kenneth M. Ames Jan 1991

Sedentism: A Temporal Shift Or A Transitional Change In Hunter-Gatherer Mobility Patterns?, Kenneth M. Ames

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Archaeologists widely perceive sedentism as a necessary precondition for social elaboration and complexity among hunter-gatherers. The origins and causes of sedentism are major archaeological research problems, and researchers concern themselves with the transition between nomadism and sedentism. In this paper I argue that there is only variation in residential patterns, which may include sedentism; that sedentism, however it is defined, is not a stable residential pattern among hunter-gatherers; and that, rather than explain the causes of sedentism, one must explain shifts in residential mobility patterns. The case study illustrating these points is drawn from the dry interior region of the ...