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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Fifty Shades Of Rosa Coldfield: Sex, Gender, And Trauma In Absalom, Absalom!, Renee A. Clare-Kovacs Jun 2013

Fifty Shades Of Rosa Coldfield: Sex, Gender, And Trauma In Absalom, Absalom!, Renee A. Clare-Kovacs

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

By using the opposing definitions of sex, male and female based on physical characteristics, as a framework, William Faulkner demonstrated the trauma of gender confusion for Absalom, Absalom!’s Rosa Coldfield. Coldfield’s role models required the expanded definitions of gender as defined by one’s social and behavioral traits, confusing Rosa’s understanding of herself in the sexual constructs of the Antebellum Southern United States. Coldfield allowed herself to believe that she could create a place for herself based on her confused understanding of sex and gender. Using traumatic texutality and repressed narrative, Faulkner transmits the impact of trauma ...


Masculinity, Madness, And Woolf's Redefinition Of Beauty In "Mrs. Dalloway", Danielle Willis-Thompson Jan 2013

Masculinity, Madness, And Woolf's Redefinition Of Beauty In "Mrs. Dalloway", Danielle Willis-Thompson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In Mrs. Dalloway, Woolf contests numerous conventions of her time, including conceptions of beauty, and its relation to gender, normalcy, and behavior. The notion of beauty as a discreet aesthetic category is not new. In fact, representations of beauty in Mrs. Dalloway directly oppose those of Edmund Burke, who categorized aesthetics of beauty in the eighteenth century. He argued that beauty is the opposite of the sublime, and classified it as having attributes of the feminine form. Burkean notions of gendered aesthetics were mirrored in Victorian gender expectations, so that men, as the opposite of their weak female counterparts, developed ...


Marriage: Suffering And Bliss, Shannon O'Connor Jan 2013

Marriage: Suffering And Bliss, Shannon O'Connor

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In The Canterbury Tales, the perfect marriage is one where tension leads to yielding, resulting in bliss. According to the Wife of Bath, she has enough authority on the topic of marriage, through her extensive life experience, to lecture on "the wo that is in marriage." While on a pilgrimage to Canterbury, she draws attention to a gender-power struggle in marriage, and through her prologue and tale, explores a theme of what women most desire. Mouthing conventional misogynistic notions of the time, Alisoun seeks the kind of authority that within her culture is traditionally offered to men. She exemplifies a ...


Acting, Integrity, And Gender In Coriolanus, Kent Lehnhof Jan 2013

Acting, Integrity, And Gender In Coriolanus, Kent Lehnhof

English Faculty Articles and Research

Shakespeare's Coriolanus... anticipates and corroborates modern-day analyses emphasizing the sociopolitical dimensions and determinants of antitheatrical discourse. In the present essay, I would like to shift my focus from questions of class/status to questions of sex/gender, endeavoring to trace the links between Coriolanus’s antiperformative zeal and his ultra-masculine identity. For though it is true that Coriolanus opposes the dissimulation of others on political grounds (i.e., it creates social confusion), what causes him to reject play-acting in his own person is the sexualized fear that it will unman him (i.e., turn him into a squeaking virgin ...


Historical Sociolinguistic Approaches To Derivational Morphology: A Study Of Speaker Gender And Nominal Suffixes In Early Modern English, Chris C. Palmer Dec 2012

Historical Sociolinguistic Approaches To Derivational Morphology: A Study Of Speaker Gender And Nominal Suffixes In Early Modern English, Chris C. Palmer

Chris C. Palmer

Sociolinguistic variables, such as gender, help nuance historical claims about language change by identifying which subsets of speakers either lead or lag in the use of different linguistic variants. But at present, scholars of historical sociolinguistics have focused primarily on syntax and inflectional morphology, often leaving derivational morphology unexplored. To fill this gap in part, this paper presents a case study of men’s and women’s use of five different nominal suffixes- ‑ness, ‑ity, -age, -ment, and –cion- within the fifteenth and sixteenth century portions of the Corpus of Early English Correspondence. This study finds that men led women ...