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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Down At The Cross, Elena Perez-Zetune Nov 2013

Down At The Cross, Elena Perez-Zetune

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For the first thirteen years of my familial life, I walked a block to devoutly pray to statues with open arms, promising open gates- my radiant mother walking with once thin father, hand in hand like a teenage couple. My sister, with her thick night-black curly hair, skipped and fell every other step, not due to young age but simply an unfortunate quarrel with gravity. Always trailing close behind was my brother clutching his precious cards shouting, “I choose you Pikachu” along the way.

From kindergarten through eighth grade, I walked through the hallways of my Catholic primary school. The ...


To Empathize With An Enemy, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Nov 2013

To Empathize With An Enemy, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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I do not like to talk about my time in Sierra Leone, but I think I’m ready to start.

Growing up in Sierra Leone was probably the best thing that ever happened to me. I carry with me fond memories of my childhood, growing up on 22 Thompson Street in the one-storey house with red doors and windows and zebra themed paint. Evenings were spent riding bikes with my best friend Fatmata. Weekend afternoons spent playing scrabble and watching our favorite Disney movies with my siblings and neighbors in our living room. Those memories I have kept, happily. [excerpt]


Fearless: Eric Lee, Eric J. Lee Nov 2013

Fearless: Eric Lee, Eric J. Lee

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Snapping pictures of his fellow Gettysburgians around campus as the visual communications intern, and fearlessly working with other students to create, organize, and lead the new Asian Student Alliance (ASA) group on campus, Eric Lee ’15 finds himself at the crossroads of art and activism.

New to campus this year after two years in the making, the ASA is a student-led, -run, and -organized group focused on celebrating different Asian cultures and heritages, closing the gap between international and domestic students, and creating a social, cultural, and political forum for students to dialogue, specifically about issues facing Asian communities. [excerpt]


Overheard At Gettysburg, Rashida Aluko-Roberts, Zakiya A. Brown, Monae S. Evans Oct 2013

Overheard At Gettysburg, Rashida Aluko-Roberts, Zakiya A. Brown, Monae S. Evans

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Monday. In Old TKE. A student of color is called in the hallway to hear the “funniest thing ever.” (giggling) “Night night little nigglet.”

Tuesday. In an AFS class. “I’m pretty sure the majority of black students in my private school were there because of sports.”

Wednesday. In Musselman. Woman: “I can’t believe Trayvon Martin got shot because someone thought skittles was a weapon.” Man: “To be honest, he did look suspicious because he was black.” [excerpt]


Fearless: Emily Cranfill, Emily J. Cranfill Oct 2013

Fearless: Emily Cranfill, Emily J. Cranfill

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Emily Cranfill ’15 has been getting a lot of attention recently, but not necessarily for all of the volunteering, organizations, and groups with which she’s normally involved. Since first hearing last week about the Ku Klux Klan’s (KKK) plans to come protest in the town of Gettysburg, Emily has been inspired to take action by organizing a Rally for Unity Against Hate on campus this Saturday afternoon while the KKK will be protesting. And the responses to her fearless ideas, enthusiasm, and initiative have been staggering. [excerpt]


Red Drops For A Rainbow, Zakiya A. Brown Oct 2013

Red Drops For A Rainbow, Zakiya A. Brown

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Splashes of pool water licked my ankles, scenting my coffee-colored toes with chlorine. Bareback guardians, robed in red, hovered high as flocks of fleshy tangible innocence skipped jubilantly across the pool deck and disappeared into a wet square pocket of sapphire. [excerpt of poem]


Fearless (Saturday): Michael Hannum, Michael W. Hannum Sep 2013

Fearless (Saturday): Michael Hannum, Michael W. Hannum

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In celebration of Alumni Homecoming Weekend and Hispanic Heritage Week, we proudly feature Michael Hannum, member of the Class of 2011, for his fearless commitment to fighting for social justice issues and his continued involvement in serving the Adams County community. Currently working with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit’s Migrant Education Program as a Recruitment Coordinator, Michael began finding his passion for helping identify families in the migrant community who need extra educational support when he was a first-year student just looking for something to do. [excerpt]


The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe Aug 2013

The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe

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“What is the diversity like at Gettysburg College?” As a tour guide, I get asked this question a lot. It’s a tricky question to answer: On one hand, I know that this is probably the family’s way of inquiring about race on campus without having to use such a taboo word, but on the other, my Diversity Peer Educator training chimes in and I want to challenge my questioner’s assumptions about what diversity even means. [excerpt]


Fearless: Professor Janet Powers And Linnea Goebel, Janet M. Powers, Linnea C. Goebel Aug 2013

Fearless: Professor Janet Powers And Linnea Goebel, Janet M. Powers, Linnea C. Goebel

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This week we would like to recognize Professor Janet Powers and recent graduate Linnea Goebel ’13 for their work in Bosnia this summer helping to set up a group of female embroiderers with an Amazon Marketplace account to sell their wares on the internet. [excerpt]


What Kind Of Asian Are You?, Uyen T. Le Jul 2013

What Kind Of Asian Are You?, Uyen T. Le

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You don’t know anything about me. You’ve never been to my country; you don’t know my native language; you may not even be able to locate Vietnam on a map.

And that’s ok. What matters isn’t that you already know about my country and my culture. What matters is your attitude toward learning about it. [excerpt]


Owning Up To The Age Old Excuse, Emily G. Hauck Jul 2013

Owning Up To The Age Old Excuse, Emily G. Hauck

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A few days ago, I was having a conversation with an older gentleman. He was friendly and very interested in my studies, but every now and then he would interject some racist slur or joke. He insistently referred to undocumented individuals as illegals because, according to him, “that’s exactly what they are.” He also made a few comments about Aryan dominance yet claimed that he wasn’t racist because he discriminates against all non-Aryans equally. The man clearly expected me to laugh along with him, especially with those last remarks, as if it were completely normal to utter them ...


Take My People To The Top, Nadejiah Z. Towns Jun 2013

Take My People To The Top, Nadejiah Z. Towns

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“…but what I really want to do is help the black people, especially the young black girls…” Did she just say that? Wait, can she say that? Is she wrong for feeling that way? I wonder how other people would feel it they knew she felt this way? So many questions began to run through my mind, but my reaction? I just sat there, nodding. Her body language told me even she knew there was something controversial about what she was saying. Not to mention that she whispered it, you know, the old hand over the mouth gesture. [excerpt]


The Race For Honors, Hannah M. Frantz May 2013

The Race For Honors, Hannah M. Frantz

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Over graduation weekend, it was pretty common to see people weighed down by massive numbers of honor cords hanging around their necks. This is a mark of respect at Gettysburg College, so students wear them proudly. I had the privilege to attend Spring Honors Day and watch many of my friends receive achievement awards. As we started winding down to the end of the ceremony, something hit me:

The recipients were overwhelmingly white. [excerpt]


I Am Not Your Video Girl, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Apr 2013

I Am Not Your Video Girl, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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“We need girls who are willing to be up on stage with us and who are not afraid to go HAM dancing in front of a crowd. I know at least a few of you who have the confidence/jaw-dropping dance moves to pull this off.” [excerpt]


Fearless: Ratco, Center For Public Service Mar 2013

Fearless: Ratco, Center For Public Service

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If you haven’t noticed yet, we’ve had some really spectacular visitors from the south with us on Gettysburg’s campus the last few days! The Random Acts of Theater Company (RATCo) is a group that emerged from the Freedom Foundation in Denver, Colorado a few years ago. Their initiative involved using theater as a means for self-expression and communication, but RATCo spread because it was so successful and ultimately reached Selma, Alabama. Selma, although a major site for the Civil Rights movement, and also the site for the last battle of the civil war, has changed very little ...


Style Watch: Blackface Edition, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Mar 2013

Style Watch: Blackface Edition, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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The above quote is from a statement/apology offered by Sebastian Kim, a photographer, whose recent editorial, “African Queen,” which featured a 16-year-old white female made to appear black, was marred with controversy. According to the photographer, dousing a young white female in deep bronze, accessorizing her in elaborate head wraps and heavy jewels (symbols that are often associated with Africa), was in no way an attempt to depict what an “African queen” looks like. Rather, his spread was attempting to showcase “the beauty aesthetic of his shoot” by using a “tanned or golden skin” model. [excerpt]


That Awkward Moment When I Accidentally Internalized Racism, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Mar 2013

That Awkward Moment When I Accidentally Internalized Racism, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

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I recently attended a conference about the importance of Africana Studies (AFS) and it had a panel of visiting professors that consisted of mostly black men and women. I was beyond impressed by their achievements and found myself engaged and excited by their discussions. My admiration for these scholars only grew exponentially when I learned that one of the female professors was from Sierra Leone, just like me! [excerpt]


How I Met Your Mother & Other Spoiler Alerts, Emily M. Lindholm Feb 2013

How I Met Your Mother & Other Spoiler Alerts, Emily M. Lindholm

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Ted: She chews loudly. Why do you think we call her Chewbacca?

Marshall: Because she’s loyal, wears shiny belts, and I resemble a young Harrison Ford.

Shortly after this scene in How I Met Your Mother’s “Spoiler Alert” episode, Marshall experiences a sinking realization that his fiancée Lilly “chews loudly,” something Marshall never seemed to notice before. Cue the tacky yet–highly effective–“glass shattering” sound effects and 20 minutes of comedic exploitation of the gang’s annoying quirks, and you get five friends with a hilariously devastating new awareness of each other’s flaws, and one brilliant ...