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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Role Of Drinking In New And Existing Friendships Across High School Settings*, Jacob E. Cheadle, Deadric T. Williams Jun 2013

The Role Of Drinking In New And Existing Friendships Across High School Settings*, Jacob E. Cheadle, Deadric T. Williams

Sociology Department, Faculty Publications

We use 9 Add Health high schools with longitudinal network data to assess whether adolescent drinkers choose friends who drink, prefer friends whose friends drink, if selection differs between new and existing friendships, and between schools. Utilizing dynamic social network models that control for friend influences on individual alcohol use, the results show that drinkers do not strongly prefer friends who drink. Instead, they favor close friends whose friends’ drink, suggesting that alcohol matters for selection on the social groups and environments that friends connect each other to. The role of alcohol use differs by whether friendships are new or ...


The Effects Of Public Self-Consciousness And Embarrassability On College Student Drinking: Evidence In Support Of A Protective Self-Presentational Model, Lizabeth A. Crawford, Katherine B. Novak Jan 2013

The Effects Of Public Self-Consciousness And Embarrassability On College Student Drinking: Evidence In Support Of A Protective Self-Presentational Model, Lizabeth A. Crawford, Katherine B. Novak

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

In this article we examine the effects of public self-consciousness (PSC) and a cross-situational reactivity to embarrassing encounters (EMB) on college students’ levels of alcohol consumption by levels of perceived peer drinking. The analysis of self-report data from two undergraduate samples (n = 118 and n = 195) yielded virtually identical results and suggests that PSC and EMB affect alcohol use primarily among students with friends who drink heavily. Among these individuals, our findings are consistent with a protective self-presentational model. While PSC increased levels of alcohol consumption among students who believed drinking to be prevalent within their social circle if they ...