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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Rugged Regulatory Landscapes, Singapore Management University Oct 2013

Rugged Regulatory Landscapes, Singapore Management University

Perspectives@SMU

Indonesia’s miners are adept at scaling the country’s rugged regulatory landscape. But their legendary resilience may be put to the test in 2014. Written by Dharma Djojonegoro, President Director of Indonesian mining services provider PT Multi Nitrotama Kimia (MNK).


Economic&Social Benefit Analysis Of Mining And Energy Projects In Solomon Islands And Papua New Guinea, Deogratias Harorimana Dr Jun 2013

Economic&Social Benefit Analysis Of Mining And Energy Projects In Solomon Islands And Papua New Guinea, Deogratias Harorimana Dr

Dr Deogratias Harorimana

The World Bank states that mining encompasses metals and minerals. It includes open-pit and underground mining, large scale operations as well activities of small scale. (World Bank.org). Many big and strong economies of the world have mineral and mining as very important sector in terms of job creation and contribution towards the overall GDP of a country. The economic benefits brought about by the mining industry to many economies, especially the developing countries are substantial. Due to mining activities, infrastructure developments are taking place and governments are able to get tax incomes which eventually go towards improving services to ...


Remapping Nature: Motherhood, Autonomy, And Anti-Mining Activism In Íntag, Ecuador, Ellicott K. Dandy Jan 2013

Remapping Nature: Motherhood, Autonomy, And Anti-Mining Activism In Íntag, Ecuador, Ellicott K. Dandy

Honors Theses

This honors thesis explores the social changes that women engaged in anti-mining activism bring to a region in rural Ecuador. I discuss the ways in which they incorporate their activist techniques into everyday life, using their status as mothers to access public discourses of environmentalism, and ultimately rewrite gender roles locally. Framing the mining conflict as a catalyst for social change, I draw parallels between this movement and indigenous politics in Ecuador, propose new interpretations of the mestizo ethnic identity and assimilation in the Spanish Empire, and finally, make the case for a nature-centric cultural analysis in anthropology.