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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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2013

International and Area Studies

Border Policy Research Institute Publications

Human Mobility

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Canadians Shopping In Northwest Washington, Border Policy Research Institute Jan 2013

Canadians Shopping In Northwest Washington, Border Policy Research Institute

Border Policy Research Institute Publications

In March 2013 the BPRI began a long-term study of the behavior of Canadian cross-border shoppers. The main goal of the study is to provide data with which to analyze the economic impacts of changes in factors that might influence cross-border shopping—changes such as a decline in the exchange rate, or a revision of sales taxes or duty-free limits.


2013/14 Imtc Passenger Vehicle Survey: Report Of Interim Findings, Border Policy Research Institute Jan 2013

2013/14 Imtc Passenger Vehicle Survey: Report Of Interim Findings, Border Policy Research Institute

Border Policy Research Institute Publications

The 2013/14 passenger vehicle survey consists of a questionnaire administered to cross-border personal vehicles at five land border ports-of-entry between Western Washington State and Lower Mainland British Columbia – commonly referred to as the Cascade Gateway. The project is advanced by the International Mobility and Trade Corridor Program (IMTC) and is the third such survey undertaken by this regional cross-border planning coalition since 2000. This report outlines the organization of the project and summarizes high level findings from the summer and winter interviews conducted in July 2013 and February 2014, respectively.


American Indians Born In Canada And The Right Of Free Access To The United States, Greg Boos, Greg Mclawsen Jan 2013

American Indians Born In Canada And The Right Of Free Access To The United States, Greg Boos, Greg Mclawsen

Border Policy Research Institute Publications

In 1794, the United States and Great Britain negotiated the Jay Treaty, established in part to mitigate the effects of the recently established boundary line between Canada and the United States on the native peoples who suddenly found their lands bisected. The rights and benefits originally set out by the Jay Treaty are now codified in statute, and continue to bestow upon Canadians with a 50% native bloodline (euphemistically referred to as “American Indians born in Canada” in U.S. immigration law) the right to freely pass the border and remain in the United States for any purpose, virtually unrestricted ...