Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 124

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Notes And News- Summer 2009 Jul 2009

Notes And News- Summer 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

DISSERTATION AWARD IN WOMEN'S HISTORY

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

VISITING SCHOLARS PROGRAM


Title And Contents- Summer 2009 Jul 2009

Title And Contents- Summer 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY

Volume 29/ Number 3 / Summer 2009

CONTENTS

CHANGING PERCEPTIONS OF HOMESTEADING AS A POLICY OF PUBLIC DOMAIN DISPOSAL

A PRAIRIE PARABLE: THE 1933 BATES TRAGEDY

CULTURAL SURVIVAL AND THE OMAHA WAY: SUMMER 2009 EUNICE WOODHULL STABLER'S LEGACY OF PRESERVATION ON THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY PLAINS

REVIEW ESSAY: THE HISTORIOGRAPHY OF A MOVING OBJECT: EMERGING UNDERSTANDINGS OF THE NORTH AMERICAN METIS

BOOK REVIEWS

NOTES AND NEWS


Book Notes- Spring 2009 Apr 2009

Book Notes- Spring 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

Prairies and Plains: The Reference Literature of a Region.

A Book of Photographs from Lonesome Dove

Fort Worth: A Personal View.

Traces of Forgotten Places: An Artist's ThirtyYear Exploration and Celebration of Texas, As It Was.

Bronze Inside and Out: A Biographical Memoir of Bob Scriver.

Wind Through the Buffalo Grass: A Lakota Story Cycle.

Outrider of Empire: The Life & Adventures of Roger Pocock, 1865-1941.

Powder River Odyssey: Nelson Cole's Western Campaign of 1865: The Journals of Lyman G. Bennett and Other Eyewitness Accounts.

Life of a Soldier on the Western Frontier

A Remarkable Curiosity: Dispatches from a ...


Title And Contents- Spring 2009 Apr 2009

Title And Contents- Spring 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY

Volume 29/Number 2/ Spring 2009

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION: DEATH, MURDER, AND MAYHEM: STORIES OF VIOLENCE AND HEALING ON THE PLAINS

DEATHSCAPES, TOPOCIDE, DOMICIDE: THE PLAINS IN CONTEMPORARY PRINT MEDIA

OPEN TO HORROR: THE GREAT PLAINS SITUATION IN CONTEMPORARY THRILLERS BY E. E. KNIGHT AND BY DOUGLAS PRESTON AND LINCOLN CHILD

CORONADO AND AESOP: FABLE AND VIOLENCE ON THE SIXTEENTH,CENTURY PLAINS

REVIEW ESSAY: NEW VIEWS ON CUSTER AND THE INDIAN WARS

BOOK REVIEWS

BOOK NOTES

NOTES AND NEWS


Review Of "Frontier Farewell: The 18705 And The End Of The Old West," By Garrett Wilson, Ted Binnema Jan 2009

Review Of "Frontier Farewell: The 18705 And The End Of The Old West," By Garrett Wilson, Ted Binnema

Great Plains Quarterly

You might just want to buy two copies-one for yourself, and one for a friend. This book by a Regina lawyer turned writer tells the story of the Canadian prairie West from the arrival of the first European explorers to 1881, although most of the book deals with the period beginning in 1869, and five of the twenty-two chapters deal with the events surrounding the time that Sitting Bull and several thousand other Sioux spent in Canada. The book was obviously written with a popular audience in mind, but it makes a significant contribution to scholarship on the history of ...


Review Of "North American Indians In The Great War." By Susan Applegate Krouse, Thomas A. Britten Jan 2009

Review Of "North American Indians In The Great War." By Susan Applegate Krouse, Thomas A. Britten

Great Plains Quarterly

Anthropologist Susan Applegate Krouse employs the records of Joseph Kossuth Dixon to shed light on the experiences of American Indian servicemen during the First World War. A former Baptist preacher, Dixon waged a twodecade- long campaign before and after WWI to preserve a record of Indian cultures and traditions before Native Americans "vanished" as distinctive peoples. To this end, Dixon traveled extensively to photograph and film reservation Indians, at times choreographing or staging scenes that fit his somewhat romanticized view of indigenous life. On the eve of the U.S. entry into WWI, he argued for the creation of segregated ...


Review Of "Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne." Edited By B. Byron Price., Joan Carpenter Troccoli Jan 2009

Review Of "Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonne." Edited By B. Byron Price., Joan Carpenter Troccoli

Great Plains Quarterly

No one painted the majestic mountains of Montana more splendidly than Charles M. Russell, but most of the action in his art, played out among the cowboys of the open range and the Native peoples of the Northern Plains, unfolds on the flat. Thanks to the comprehensive electronic catalogue of Russell's paintings, drawings, watercolors, models in mixed mediums, and illustrated letters available with this print publication, the reader can verify these assertions without tipping a single book off the library shelf.

Catalogues raisonnes have always stimulated the discovery of lost works and the reattribution and redating of others, and ...


Notes And News- Winter 2009 Jan 2009

Notes And News- Winter 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

CALL FOR PAPERS

VISITING SCHOLARS PROGRAM GRANTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

CENTER FOR GREAT PLAINS STUDIES CONFERENCE


Review Of "Choctaw Nation: A Story Of American Indian Resurgence." By Valerie Lambert, James Taylor Carson Jan 2009

Review Of "Choctaw Nation: A Story Of American Indian Resurgence." By Valerie Lambert, James Taylor Carson

Great Plains Quarterly

Choctaw Nation fits nicely into two recent trends in the development of Native American history. First, Valerie Lambert draws interpretive threads into the twenty-first century explored for the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Circe Sturm's Blood Politics (2002), Donna L. Akers's Living in the Land of Death (2004), and Fay A. Yarbrough's Race and the Cherokee Nation (2008). For Lambert the past thirty years or so have comprised a renewal of the Choctaw Nation that is at the same time part of a larger "cycle of rupture and rebirth" that reaches back at least to the 1500s ...


Review Of "Mary Martin, Broadway Legend." By Ronald L. Davis, John M. Clum Jan 2009

Review Of "Mary Martin, Broadway Legend." By Ronald L. Davis, John M. Clum

Great Plains Quarterly

Mary Martin has not been as well treated in biographies as her sometime colleague Ethel Merman, the subject of two fine books in the past year. So Ronald L. Davis's volume is a welcome addition to lore about the stars of the Golden Age of the Broadway Musical.

Ronald Davis got interested in Martin in part because of her Texas connections {she was born and raised in Weatherford, Texas}. A historian with interests in oral history and show business {he has written books on John Wayne, John Ford, and Linda Darnell}, Davis interviewed Martin before her death as well ...


Review Of Women In Texas Music: Stories And Songs By Kathleen Hudson, Gail Folkins Jan 2009

Review Of Women In Texas Music: Stories And Songs By Kathleen Hudson, Gail Folkins

Great Plains Quarterly

Women musicians take center stage in Women in Texas Music, from the gender barriers they've broken as performers and artists to the growing recognition and musical territory they claim. Through a series of personal interviews, Kathleen Hudson depicts more than thirty women musicians' journeys in Texas, the Southwest, and in many cases beyond. The author's lively exchange with songwriters and performers invites readers deeper into the conversation, as if they've snuck backstage themselves to listen in.

One of the more engaging themes in Women in Texas Music is the various paths traveled by these artists, each road ...


Review Of Willie Wells: "Ei Diablo" Of The Negro Leagues, By Bob Luke, Leslie Heaphy Jan 2009

Review Of Willie Wells: "Ei Diablo" Of The Negro Leagues, By Bob Luke, Leslie Heaphy

Great Plains Quarterly

Bob Luke introduces readers to Willie Wells the man as well as Willie Wells the ball player. Wells's life is placed in the larger context of where he came from in Texas as well as what was happening in America during and after his baseball career ended. To tell his story Luke relies on primary sources as much as possible. Interviews and Wells's own letters are nicely woven throughout the text, giving readers an immediate feel for Wells as a person.

After presenting Wells the player and family man, Luke offers a discussion of the long road to ...


Review Of Dark Storm Moving West, By Barbara Belyea, Arn Keeling Jan 2009

Review Of Dark Storm Moving West, By Barbara Belyea, Arn Keeling

Great Plains Quarterly

In the freshet of scholarly and popular studies accompanying the recent bicentennials of Lewis and Clark's and David Thompson's westward explorations, Dark Storm Moving West forms an eddy of reflection on the practical, communicative, and philosophical challenges of understanding Euro-American exploration in western North America. English professor turned exploration historian Barbara Belyea eschews traditional narratives or grand theses in favor of dense rumination on particular episodes, personalities, and questions. Swirling and riffled at the surface, these waters yet find more subtle coherences in their depths than Belyea herself admits.

Her essays are focused loosely on the figure of ...


Review Of The Painted Valley: Artists Along Alberta's Bow River, 1845-2000, By Christopher Armstrong And H. V. Nelles, Mary-Beth Laviolette Jan 2009

Review Of The Painted Valley: Artists Along Alberta's Bow River, 1845-2000, By Christopher Armstrong And H. V. Nelles, Mary-Beth Laviolette

Great Plains Quarterly

As books about art go, The Painted Valley is an unusual undertaking because neither Christopher Armstrong nor H. V. Nelles is a specialist in the field of Canadian art. Both emeritus professors at Toronto's York University, they are environmental historians who, in the process of researching a book about southern Alberta's 600-kilometer-Iong Bow River, "stumbled" upon a "cache of pictures" inspired by that stony ribbon of blue: paintings, photographs, and works on paper found largely in the collections of Calgary's Glenbow Museum, Banff's Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, and the Edmontonbased Alberta Foundation for the ...


Review Of Native America, Discovered And Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, And Manifest Destiny. By Robert J. Miller, Jenry Morsman Jan 2009

Review Of Native America, Discovered And Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, And Manifest Destiny. By Robert J. Miller, Jenry Morsman

Great Plains Quarterly

In recent decades, scholars have reshaped our understanding of conquest, and as a result the idea of conquest is an unsettling one. Robert J. Miller's original and important work should launch a similar transformation for the idea of discovery. Associate Professor at the Lewis & Clark Law School and Chief Justice, Court of Appeals, Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, Miller persuasively argues that the principle of international law known as the Doctrine of Discovery provided the legal rationale and framework for the westward expansion of the United States. It, too, he argues, accounts for the troubling ...


Review Of Navigating The Missouri: Steamboating On Nature's Highway, 1819-1935 By William E. Lass, Ken Robison Jan 2009

Review Of Navigating The Missouri: Steamboating On Nature's Highway, 1819-1935 By William E. Lass, Ken Robison

Great Plains Quarterly

For more than forty years, William E. Lass's pathbreaking A History of Steamboating on the Upper Missouri served as the authoritative history of the Upper Missouri. Now, Lass has culminated his career by extending his important study to the entire Missouri River and its navigable tributaries, the premier river corridor in the trans-Mississippi West.

From St. Louis to Fort Benton, the Missouri River served as a natural highway into the vast North American West. Lass places the progress of steamboating on the Missouri River in the context of the western movement, fueled by the surge in American nationalism and ...


A Prairie Parable The 1933 Bates Tragedy, Bill Walser Jan 2009

A Prairie Parable The 1933 Bates Tragedy, Bill Walser

Great Plains Quarterly

It was one of the more harrowing episodes of the Great Depression. Ted and Rose Bates had failed in business in Glidden, Saskatchewan, in 1932 and again on the west coast of Canada the following year. When they were subsequently turned down for relief assistance twice, first in Vancouver and then in Saskatoon, because they did not meet the local residency requirements, the couple decided to end their lives in a remote rural schoolyard, taking their eightyear- old son, Jackie, with them rather than face the shame of returning home to Glidden as a relief case. But it was only ...


Review Of Myth Of The Hanging Tree: Stories Of Crime And Punishment In Territorial New Mexico By Robert J. Torrez, Mark A. Allan Jan 2009

Review Of Myth Of The Hanging Tree: Stories Of Crime And Punishment In Territorial New Mexico By Robert J. Torrez, Mark A. Allan

Great Plains Quarterly

New Mexico is a state where regions and cultures collide. Partly situated in the western Great Plains, the lynchings and legal executions that have taken place in the former territory and current state illustrate tensions between the cultures residing therein. Robert J. Torrez, former New Mexico State Historian, ably captures the influence of the Anglos' "Judge Lynch" in the region formerly inhabited by Native Americans and later settled first by the Spanish and then the Anglo-Americans.

In the opening third of the book, Torrez provides an overview of hangings and capital punishment in the area. Concentrating on the territorial days ...


Review Of The Steamboat Montana And The Opening Of The West: History. Excavation, And Architecture. By Annalies Corbin And Bradley A. Rogers, Michael Allen Jan 2009

Review Of The Steamboat Montana And The Opening Of The West: History. Excavation, And Architecture. By Annalies Corbin And Bradley A. Rogers, Michael Allen

Great Plains Quarterly

In recent decades, a group of maritime historical archeologists has, through meticulous examination of sunken ships, enhanced existing work by traditional archeologists and historians. Eastern Carolina University's History Department has built North America's strongest program in maritime archeology. It was an ECU team, supported by a score of public {and two} private groups, that gathered the data for this book about the nineteenth-century Missouri River steamboat Montana. Coauthors Annalies Corbin and Bradley A. Rogers write, "The Montana's history and subsequent archeological investigation can be utilized as a case study for understanding and appreciating the development of the ...


Review Of Buffalo Bill On Stage. By Sandra K. Sagala, Robert Bonner Jan 2009

Review Of Buffalo Bill On Stage. By Sandra K. Sagala, Robert Bonner

Great Plains Quarterly

Of the twelve (!) serious historical or biographical studies devoted to Buffalo Bill Cody so far this century, two of them we owe to Sandra Sagala. The title under review here is a revision of her self-publish.ed book from 2002 titled Buffalo Bill, Actor, where she set out to follow Cody as he put together a career on theater stages across the country playing himself in a series of dramas and creating a name as an entertainer in the years prior to his famous Wild West show. This new book does not follow Cody's itineraries as closely as the ...


Review Of Stricken Field: The Little Bighorn Since 1876 By Jerome A. Greene, Thomas R. Buecker Jan 2009

Review Of Stricken Field: The Little Bighorn Since 1876 By Jerome A. Greene, Thomas R. Buecker

Great Plains Quarterly

Interest in the Battle of the Little Bighorn, commonly known as Custer's Last Stand, has not abated over the last century. It is said that the only other battle in American history with more written about it is Gettysburg. True to form with other historic sites, the history of the Little Bighorn battlefield after the battle ended forms a compelling part of its total story.

Any site that holds such a prominent place in the American {and international} psyche warrants both an informative and accurate history. In Stricken Field, Jerome A. Greene, retired National Parks Service research historian, rises ...


Review Of Means Of Transit: A Slightly Embellished Memoir. By Teresa Miller, Joy Castro Jan 2009

Review Of Means Of Transit: A Slightly Embellished Memoir. By Teresa Miller, Joy Castro

Great Plains Quarterly

In Means of Transit, the narrative is always on the move. For aspiring writer Teresa Miller, her hometown of Tahlequah, Oklahoma, was a trap to be escaped, and the Plains were the boring backdrop of restless road trips with her grandmother. Craving the excitement of New York, Miller managed to break free (in her fifties) only as far as Tulsa.

Miller is an endearing narrator, gamely revealing her own pratfalls, and, as a generous enthusiast of literature, she eventually published two novels and founded a book festival and television show in order to "reel in the horizon." But the narrative ...


Review Of Intimate Modernism: Fort Worth Circle Artists In The 1940s. By Scott Grant Barker And Jane Myers, Katie Robinson-Edwards Jan 2009

Review Of Intimate Modernism: Fort Worth Circle Artists In The 1940s. By Scott Grant Barker And Jane Myers, Katie Robinson-Edwards

Great Plains Quarterly

This stunning catalogue investigates the adventurous accomplishments of a too-littleknown group that became known as the Fort Worth Circle. These artists shunned the typical Texas "bluebonnet school" styles of late impressionism and landscapes. Instead, they looked to European modernism for form-and inward for subject matter. The two essays-by cultural historian Scott Grant Barker and Jane Myers, Amon Carter Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings-are wonderfully paired. Barker offers a thoroughly researched account of the origins and exhibition history of these forward thinking artists, rich with anecdote and archival research. His expertise in the Circle is perhaps unparalleled. Myers delves into ...


Review Of Before The Country: Native Renaissance, Canadian Mythology. By Stephanie Mckenzie, Jo-Ann Episkenew Jan 2009

Review Of Before The Country: Native Renaissance, Canadian Mythology. By Stephanie Mckenzie, Jo-Ann Episkenew

Great Plains Quarterly

In Before the Country, Stephanie McKenzie examines Canadian literature of the 1960s and 1970s "to identify mythological patterns that are likely to become formulas when critics assume that Canada is like any other nation to have emerged since the breakdown of Charlemagne's empire." A time when Canadians were struggling to invent a collec~ tive identity, the years surrounding Canada's centennial were critical for the development of Canadian literature and culture.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Indigenous people, in contrast, were experiencing what McKenzie terms "the Native Renaissance," and their literary output caused a crisis for settlers: "a nationally ...


Review Of African Creeks: Estelvste And The Creek Nation. By Gary Zellar, Robbie Ethridge Jan 2009

Review Of African Creeks: Estelvste And The Creek Nation. By Gary Zellar, Robbie Ethridge

Great Plains Quarterly

Estelvste, or "black people," in the Creek Indian language, are the subjects of this well-written, absorbing story of the people of African descent whose lot in life cast them with the Creek Indians of present-day Georgia and Alabama and, after Indian Removal, present- day Oklahoma. Gary Zellar refers to them as African Creeks, distinguishing this particular population from both African Americans, Euro-American Creeks, and Indian Creeks. Such distinctions are necessary to the history of the Creek Indians because, after European contact, Creek lives became irreversibly and forever blended with those of the immigrant populations, yet the Creeks themselves adhered in ...


Review Of Working Girls In The West: Representations Of Wage-Earning Women. By Lindsey Mcmaster, Judy Fudge Jan 2009

Review Of Working Girls In The West: Representations Of Wage-Earning Women. By Lindsey Mcmaster, Judy Fudge

Great Plains Quarterly

Lindsey McMaster provides a lively account of how the working girl was "imagined, represented, and constructed as a figure within the cultural narratives of Canada, the West, and the empire" during the period of rapid economic growth and profound social transformation from the late 1800s to the early 1920s. She examines a range of different types of textsnewspaper reports, reform and social-purity discourse, official reports on labor, women's travel accounts of Canada, and Canadian literature and poetry-for common themes and tropes. Her goal is to see how social narratives of the working girl in the West, that vast imaginary ...


Review Of Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social And Cultural History. Edited By John W. Storey And Mary L. Kelley, Tom Wagy Jan 2009

Review Of Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social And Cultural History. Edited By John W. Storey And Mary L. Kelley, Tom Wagy

Great Plains Quarterly

"Given such a large body of scholarship," editors John W. Storey and Mary L. Kelley admit, "another study of Texas seems hardly necessary." Nevertheless, they contend, Twentieth Century Texas: A Social and Cultural History (a collection of fifteen essays) fills a weakness in the Lone Star State's history bibliography, arguing that social and cultural subjects have received "short shrift" in survey texts. Moreover, Storey and Kelly justify their volume because "it focuses solely on the past century, bringing the story up-to-date."

All students of Texas's past will enjoy this collection. Summary histories of Mexican Texans, blacks, women, literature ...


Review Of Reclaiming Charles Weidman (1901-1975): An American Dancer's Life And Legacy By Jonette Lancos, Ronald J. Zank Jan 2009

Review Of Reclaiming Charles Weidman (1901-1975): An American Dancer's Life And Legacy By Jonette Lancos, Ronald J. Zank

Great Plains Quarterly

Through her extensive study, Jonette Lancos rectifies the historical neglect of modern dance pioneer and Nebraska native Charles Weidman. Perhaps overshadowed by the greater attention accorded his partner and collaborator Doris Humphrey, with whom Weidman established the Humphrey-Weidman Company and School, Weidman has not been the focus of a critical biography until now. Without denying the importance of Humphrey's influence, Lancos seeks to examine other influences on Weidman's work and to explore his individual achievements.

Lancos begins with an overview of Weidman's career, framed by excerpts from his essay written as a ninth-grader in Lincoln, Nebraska. Then ...


Review Of A Terrible Glory: Custer And The Little Bighorn-The Last Great Battle Of The American West By James Donovan; The Day The World Ended At Little Bighorn: A Lakota History By Joseph M. Marshall; Custerology: The Enduring Legacy Of The Indian Wars And George Armstrong Custer By Michael A. Elliott, Robert W. Larson Jan 2009

Review Of A Terrible Glory: Custer And The Little Bighorn-The Last Great Battle Of The American West By James Donovan; The Day The World Ended At Little Bighorn: A Lakota History By Joseph M. Marshall; Custerology: The Enduring Legacy Of The Indian Wars And George Armstrong Custer By Michael A. Elliott, Robert W. Larson

Great Plains Quarterly

During the last few years a number of books on the Indian wars fought in the upper Great Plains have been published. The three under review here are among the best. Donovan's A Terrible Glory, the most ambitious, is a study of epic proportions involving the life of George Armstrong Custer and his military career, starting with his rather humble birth in Ohio and ending with his death at the Little Bighorn. Donovan does more than just focus on Custer and his tumultuous years with the U.S. Army, however. His first chapter, for instance, deals with the long ...


Notes And News Jan 2009

Notes And News

Great Plains Quarterly

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

FREDERICK C. LUEBKE AWARD