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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Treating Malnutrition In Hospitals: Dietitians In The Driving Seat?, K. L. Walton Dec 2009

Treating Malnutrition In Hospitals: Dietitians In The Driving Seat?, K. L. Walton

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Although the problem of malnutrition in hospitals is not new,1,2 it is still a serious concern in Australian hospitals today. The population is ageing and patients are admitted with multiple medical problems placing them at increased risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition prevalence rates in Australian hospitals have ranged from 6-53%.3-13 The wide variation is due to different study settings; the time between admission and assessment, and the assessment tool used. Malnutrition is a considerable problem that increases with age. Patients over 80 years have a higher odds risk of being malnourished compared with those between 61-80 years.9 ...


Prison Foodservice In Australia - Systems, Menus And Inmate Attitudes, P. Williams, Karen L. Walton, M. Hannan-Jones Aug 2009

Prison Foodservice In Australia - Systems, Menus And Inmate Attitudes, P. Williams, Karen L. Walton, M. Hannan-Jones

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper presents results from three studies in 25 custodial facilities in three Australian states, including nutrient analyses of menus and focus groups exploring inmate attitudes. Both cook-fresh and cook-chill production systems are used. Non-selective cycle menus of 4-6 weeks are common but inmates can supplement meals by purchase of additional food items (‘buy-ups’). Menus included adequate variety and met most nutritional standards, with the possible exception of fruit. The sodium content of menus is above recommended levels. Protein, fibre, vitamins A, C, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, iron and zinc were more than adequate, and the percentage energy from fat is ...


Regulatory Issues And Functional Health Claims For Bioactive Dairy Compounds, P. Roupas, P. G. Williams, C. Margetts Jul 2009

Regulatory Issues And Functional Health Claims For Bioactive Dairy Compounds, P. Roupas, P. G. Williams, C. Margetts

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Dairy foods and ingredients have a natural advantage over new/novel foods, from a regulatory viewpoint, because they are generally considered as “traditional” foods, that is, there is a long history of human consumption. However, the regulatory landscape on adding bioactive ingredients, whether from dairy streams or from non-dairy sources, into dairy foods is rapidly evolving, and the dairy industry will need to be aware of potential regulatory challenges, within the countries they wish to market their products.


Foodservice Perspective In Institutions, P. G. Williams Jun 2009

Foodservice Perspective In Institutions, P. G. Williams

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In Western countries around 10-15% of all foodservice meals are provided in institutional settings such as hospitals, nursing homes, prisons, schools, military settings and workplace canteens. This chapter describes the different types of meals and foodservice systems used in these institutional settings, including the menus used, nutritional standards, food waste, meals times, methods of counting meals and possible future trends.


Current Dietetic Practices Of Obesity Management In Saudi Arabia And Comparison With Australian Practices And Best Practice Criteria, A. Almajwal, P. Williams, Marijka Batterham Jun 2009

Current Dietetic Practices Of Obesity Management In Saudi Arabia And Comparison With Australian Practices And Best Practice Criteria, A. Almajwal, P. Williams, Marijka Batterham

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: To describe the dietetic practices of the treatment of obesity in Saudi Arabia and compare this with best practice criteria and the practice in Australia. Methods: Anonymous questionnaires were completed by dietitians in Saudi Arabia. The topics included barriers to obesity management, demand and level of service and strategies and approaches used for weight management. Best practice scores were based on those used to assess Australian dietitians. Results: 253 dietitians participated in the survey. Of these, 175 (69 %) were involved in the management of obesity. The best practice score for Australian dietitians was slightly but significantly greater than the ...


Trends In The Affordability Of The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket 2000-2007, P. G. Williams, A. Hull, M. Kontos Feb 2009

Trends In The Affordability Of The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket 2000-2007, P. G. Williams, A. Hull, M. Kontos

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aims
The Illawarra Healthy Food Basket (IHFB) was developed as one measure to monitor the affordability of healthy eating in Australia. It consists of 57 items selected to meet the nutritional requirements of a reference family of five. The basket was first costed in the Illawarra region of Australia in 2000 and again in 2001 and 2003. This study aimed to repeat the costing of the basket in 2005 and 2007 and to assess the trends in affordability since 2000.
Methods
Costing was carried out in the same five suburbs as previous surveys, utilising a large supermarket, greengrocer and butcher ...


Developing Korean Academy Of Medical Sciences Guideline For Rating The Impairment In Mental And Behavioural Disorders; A Comparative Study Of Knpa's New Guidelines And Ama's 6th Guides, Gordon R. Davies Jan 2009

Developing Korean Academy Of Medical Sciences Guideline For Rating The Impairment In Mental And Behavioural Disorders; A Comparative Study Of Knpa's New Guidelines And Ama's 6th Guides, Gordon R. Davies

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

I refer to the paper by Ryu, Hong, Jung, Hwang, Jung, Jeong, Rah and Suh (2009) (1). The assessment of psychiatric disability is difficult and fraught with methodological problems and the review by Ryu and colleagues tends to perpetuate the use of methods of assessment which have no firm evidence base as well as ignoring some significant problems with the use of the American Medical Association Guides as well as the Psychiatric Impairment Rating Scale (PIRS).


The Effect Of Detraining On Muscle Strength And Cross-Sectional Area Following Unilateral Resistance Training, Herbert Groeller, John A. Sampson Jan 2009

The Effect Of Detraining On Muscle Strength And Cross-Sectional Area Following Unilateral Resistance Training, Herbert Groeller, John A. Sampson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Muscle strength appears well preserved following short periods of detraining, despite a decline in muscle cross-sectional area and muscle activation. PURPOSE: This study determined the effect a 12-week unilateral elbow flexor resistance training regimen followed by 8 weeks of detraining on muscle cross-sectional area, muscle activation, and dynamic and static strength in trained and non-exercising contralateral limbs. METHODS: Ten males volunteered for the investigation and completed a 4-week pre-treatment training period (50-80%1RM) prior to commencing the experimental resistance training regimen. Subjects attended 3 sessions per week over 12 weeks of experimental training wherein they exercised at 85%1RM. Each ...


Decreased Density Of Serotonin 2a Receptors In The Superior Temporal Gyrus In Schizophrenia - A Postmortem Study, Xu-Feng Huang, Chao Deng, Qing Wang, Kai Kang Jan 2009

Decreased Density Of Serotonin 2a Receptors In The Superior Temporal Gyrus In Schizophrenia - A Postmortem Study, Xu-Feng Huang, Chao Deng, Qing Wang, Kai Kang

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia,particularly with regards to auditory hallucinations. In this study, using in situ quantitative autoradiography in postmortem tissue, we investigated the binding of the [3H]ketanserin to 5-HT2A receptors and [3H] mesulergine to 5-HT2C receptors in the left STG of 8 male schizophrenic patients compared to 8 control subjects. A strong [3H]ketanserin binding was observed in the STG, however there was a very weak [3H] mesulergine binding in the STG. A significant decrease in binding of [3H]ketanserin was clearly observed in schizophrenia patients in comparison with ...


Supporting Recovery Orientated Services For People With Severe Mental Illness, Frank P. Deane, Samson Tse, Chris Lloyd, Geoff Waghorn Jan 2009

Supporting Recovery Orientated Services For People With Severe Mental Illness, Frank P. Deane, Samson Tse, Chris Lloyd, Geoff Waghorn

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

There is now wide agreement that people with severe mental illness can be adequately treated and cared for in the community, provided back-up hospital care is available when needed. Another important development has been the recognition that clinical treatment and care is insufficient for recovery and restoration of role functioning following illness onset, and must be supplemented by evidence-based practices in psychiatric rehabilitation. This article describes how allied health professionals can lead recovery oriented approaches that incorporate evidence-based forms of psychiatric rehabilitation. Family psychoeducation and supported employment are provided as examples of such evidence-based practices that require wider implementation.


Benchmarking In The Non-Government Sector, Peter Kelly, Frank Deane, Trevor Crowe, Carla Morgan Jan 2009

Benchmarking In The Non-Government Sector, Peter Kelly, Frank Deane, Trevor Crowe, Carla Morgan

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

[extract] A Question to Ponder - How does your service compare to other similar services in the industry? How would knowing this help your organisation?


Whose Standards? An Examination Of Community Attitudes Towards Australian Advertising, Sandra C. Jones, Katherine Eagleton Jan 2009

Whose Standards? An Examination Of Community Attitudes Towards Australian Advertising, Sandra C. Jones, Katherine Eagleton

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

There is considerable ongoing debate in Australia, as in other countries, about the ethicality of current advertising practices. In recent years there has been an increase in the public focus on offensive or unacceptable advertising – such as overt sex appeals, racial vilification, and promotion of unsafe use of consumer products – arguing that many of these advertisements (ads) are contrary to community standards. The industry, on the other hand, argues that it produces ads that are designed to meet and appeal to community standards. There is no comprehensive data on the nature of community standards in relation to advertising, and the ...


Women's Awareness Of The Importance Of Long-Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Consumption During Pregnancy: Knowledge Of Risks, Benefits And Information Accessibility, Danka S. Sinikovic, Heather R. Yeatman, Deborah Cameron, Barbara J. Meyer Jan 2009

Women's Awareness Of The Importance Of Long-Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Consumption During Pregnancy: Knowledge Of Risks, Benefits And Information Accessibility, Danka S. Sinikovic, Heather R. Yeatman, Deborah Cameron, Barbara J. Meyer

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pregnant women's knowledge regarding the importance of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) consumption during pregnancy and assess their views on current information availability.

DESIGN: A 27-item demographic and food safety/behaviour questionnaire was administered to pregnant women during their antenatal clinic visits. chi2 tests were performed using SPSS.

SETTING: Antenatal clinics at two regional hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

SUBJECTS: One hundred and ninety (n 190) pregnant women.

RESULTS: Three quarters of the women had not received information regarding LC n-3 PUFA. Approximately half of the women were aware of issues relating ...


A Botanical Approach To Managing Obesity, Dilip Ghosh Jan 2009

A Botanical Approach To Managing Obesity, Dilip Ghosh

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

metabolic syndrome in check like obesity. There are few drugs in the market to ameliorate or prevent obesity but there are the costs, efficacy and side effects to consider. For centuries people across the countries have been using natural products and plant based dietary supplements for weight control. The current review will consists of one South Asian herb, Garcinia cambogia and one Chinese herb, Magnolia officinalis.


The Impact Of More Visible Standard Drink Labelling On Youth Alcohol Consumption: Helping Young People Drink (Ir)Responsibly?, Sandra C. Jones, Parri Gregory Jan 2009

The Impact Of More Visible Standard Drink Labelling On Youth Alcohol Consumption: Helping Young People Drink (Ir)Responsibly?, Sandra C. Jones, Parri Gregory

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction and Aims. In response to increasing concerns about excessive drinking among young people the Australian alcohol industry announced that it will introduce more visible standard drink labels. This study sought to examine whether young people use this information in a way that decreases, or increases, alcohol-related harms. Design and Methods. Six focus groups with students enrolled in an undergraduate university course in a large regional city in New South Wales, recruited by direct approach on the university grounds and via an online message posted on the university bulletin board. Results: The majority of the participants reported that they are ...


Shoes On Trial: Does A Safe Shoe Exist For Older People?, Bridget J. Munro, Karen J. Mickle, Jasmine C. Menant, Julie R. Steele Jan 2009

Shoes On Trial: Does A Safe Shoe Exist For Older People?, Bridget J. Munro, Karen J. Mickle, Jasmine C. Menant, Julie R. Steele

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

More than 80% of older people report foot problems and, as a result, tend to wear unstructured footwear that moulds to the shape of their deformed feet. While these unstructured shoes are deemed comfortable, it has been speculated that they contribute to home falls and hip fractures in the older population [1]. However, as walking barefoot or in socks has also been associated with an increased risk of falls in older people [2], we need to design safe but comfortable shoes for older people to wear in and around the home.


Cardiac Electrophysiology During Progressive And Controlled Dehydration: Inferences From Ecg Analysis During Steady-State Exercise And Recovery, Gregory E. Peoples, M. Brown, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Nigel A.S. Taylor Jan 2009

Cardiac Electrophysiology During Progressive And Controlled Dehydration: Inferences From Ecg Analysis During Steady-State Exercise And Recovery, Gregory E. Peoples, M. Brown, Anne M.J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Nigel A.S. Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

When fluid intake is insufficient to match sweat losses, dehydration develops. It is well established that dehydration impacts unfavourably upon cardiovascular function, including cardiac output and peripheral blood flow (Gonzalez-Alonso et al., 1998). However, the limitations of cardiac electrophysiology in the dehydrated state are not known. In light of possible electrolyte imbalances, particularly when water deficit moves towards 7% of total body mass, it is worth considering the possibility of adverse conduction changes, as reflected within the electrocardiogram (ECG), may accompany electrolyte loss. In addition, the ECG can also be employed to investigate other cardiac limitations, such as myocardial ischaemia ...


Immersion Cooling During Hyperthermia: Why Warmer May Be Better, Joanne N. Caldwell, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Mitchell J. Clark, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A. S Taylor Jan 2009

Immersion Cooling During Hyperthermia: Why Warmer May Be Better, Joanne N. Caldwell, Anne M. J Van Den Heuvel, Pete Kerry, Mitchell J. Clark, Gregory E. Peoples, Nigel A. S Taylor

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

A significant number of military personnel suffer from exertional heat illness, with some extreme cases resulting in death. These illnesses may occur without warning, they are often characterised by a rapid onset and can occur even in experienced personnel. Various field treatments for hyperthermia have been developed, and one of particular interest is the use of cold-water immersion. Not surprisingly, immersion in ice-cold water (0-2oC) has been shown to be an effective means of rapidly reducing body core temperature (Proulx et al., 2003, 2006).


Older Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Qualitative Study, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson Jan 2009

Older Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Qualitative Study, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Research suggests that older patients may be reluctant to engage general practice registrars (GPRs) in their care. The authors undertook a qualitative study of the attitudes of older patients to GPRs to investigate this issue. Method Thirty-eight patients aged 60 years and over from three training practices participated in semistructured telephone interviews, which explored patients responses to GPRs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a template analysis approach. Results Analysis of the interviews produced five major themes concerning patient attitudes to GPRs: desire for continuity, desire for access, openness, trust and a desire for meaningful communication. Discussion ...


Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Review Of The Literature, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Samantha Reis, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson Jan 2009

Patients' Attitudes To General Practice Registrars: A Review Of The Literature, Andrew D. Bonney, Lyn Phillipson, Samantha Reis, Sandra C. Jones, Donald Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction With the population ageing, it is imperative for training practices to provide GP registrars with sound experience in managing the health problems of older persons, especially chronic conditions. However, it is reported that a significant proportion of these patients will be resistant to consulting registrars, with concerns regarding disruption of continuity of care being a significant factor. The challenge for training practices is to identify approaches to engage registrars in the management of older patients whilst maintaining patient satisfaction. This paper presents a review of the literature on patient attitudes to general practice registrars to better understand the nature ...


Performance Of Body Mass Index In Predicting Diabetes And Hypertension In The Eastern Province Of Saudi Arabia, Ali M. Almajwal, Nadira A. Al-Baghli, Marijka J. Batterham, Peter G. Williams, Khalid A. Al-Turki, Aqeel J. Al-Ghamdi Jan 2009

Performance Of Body Mass Index In Predicting Diabetes And Hypertension In The Eastern Province Of Saudi Arabia, Ali M. Almajwal, Nadira A. Al-Baghli, Marijka J. Batterham, Peter G. Williams, Khalid A. Al-Turki, Aqeel J. Al-Ghamdi

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: BMI is the most widely used measure to diagnose obesity but its accuracy and usefulness in Saudi subjects is unknown. This study aimed to assess the validity of standard BMI cut-point values in the Saudi population. SUBJECTS/ METHODS: 197,681 adults participated in a cross-sectional study to detect diabetes and hypertension in the Saudi Eastern province in 2004/5, with blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, height and weight measurements taken. Sensitivities, specificities, areas under the curves, predictive values, likelihood ratios, false positive, false negatives and total misclassification ratios were calculated for various BMI values determined from receiver ...


Qigong As A Mindful Exercise Intervention For People Living With Mental Ill Health, Chris Lloyd, H. Tsang, Frank P. Deane Jan 2009

Qigong As A Mindful Exercise Intervention For People Living With Mental Ill Health, Chris Lloyd, H. Tsang, Frank P. Deane

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: Individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to be overweight or obese than the general population, and the associated health problems put them at a higher risk of death. Exercise is therefore an important non-pharmacological intervention that mental health workers can assist clients to engage in, and mindful exercise approaches may be particularly well-suited to this population. Content: This article describes the concept of qigong as a mindful exercise and looks at preliminary evidence suggesting that mindful exercise is of physical and emotional benefit to people with mental ill health. The authors propose an easy, standardized exercise protocol which clinicians ...


Stereoscopic Discrimination Of The Layout Of Ground Surfaces, Robert S. Allison, Barbara J. Gillam, Stephen A. Palmisano Jan 2009

Stereoscopic Discrimination Of The Layout Of Ground Surfaces, Robert S. Allison, Barbara J. Gillam, Stephen A. Palmisano

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Safe and effective locomotion depends critically on judgements of the surface properties of the ground to be traversed. Little is known about the role of binocular vision in surface perception at distances relevant to visually guided locomotion in humans. Programmable arrays of illuminated targets were used to present sparsely textured surfaces with real depth at distances of 4.5 and 9.0 m. Psychophysical measurements of discrimination thresholds demonstrated a clear superiority for stereoscopic over monocular judgments of relative and absolute surface slant. Judgements of surface roughness in particular demonstrated a substantial binocular advantage. Binocular vision is thus shown to ...


Effects Of Gaze On Vection From Jittering, Oscillating, And Purely Radial Optic Flow, Stephen A. Palmisano, Juno Kim Jan 2009

Effects Of Gaze On Vection From Jittering, Oscillating, And Purely Radial Optic Flow, Stephen A. Palmisano, Juno Kim

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In this study, we examined the effects of different gaze types (stationary fixation, directed looking, or gaze shifting) and gaze eccentricities (central or peripheral) on the vection induced by jittering, oscillating, and purely radial optic flow. Contrary to proposals of eccentricity independence for vection (e.g., Post, 1988), we found that peripheral directed looking improved vection and peripheral stationary fixation impaired vection induced by purely radial flow (relative to central gaze). Adding simulated horizontal or vertical viewpoint oscillation to radial flow always improved vection, irrespective of whether instructions were to fixate, or look at, the center or periphery of the ...


Psychophysiological Responses To Win And Loss Events During Electronic Gaming Machine (Egm) Play: A Pilot Investigation, Benjamin Wilkes, Craig J. Gonsalvez, Alex Blaszczynski Jan 2009

Psychophysiological Responses To Win And Loss Events During Electronic Gaming Machine (Egm) Play: A Pilot Investigation, Benjamin Wilkes, Craig J. Gonsalvez, Alex Blaszczynski

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The pilot study used state-of-the art psychophysiological equipment to monitor, on a second-bysecond basis, skin conductance level (SCL) and heart rate (HR) of university students (n = 12) in response to win and loss events while playing an electronic gaming machine (EGM). Each win and loss event was recorded and physiological changes associated with these events sorted and averaged based on event type (win/loss) and time (pre and post events). Compared to pre-event baselines, both SCL and HR increased following the occurrence of a win but not to a loss event. SCL was the more sensitive of the two measures ...


Children's Health And Rf Emf Exposure, Peter Wiedemann, Holger Schutz, Franziska Borner, Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff, Rodney J. Croft, Alexander Lerchl, Luc Martens, Georg Neubauer, Sabine Regel, Michael Repacholi Jan 2009

Children's Health And Rf Emf Exposure, Peter Wiedemann, Holger Schutz, Franziska Borner, Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff, Rodney J. Croft, Alexander Lerchl, Luc Martens, Georg Neubauer, Sabine Regel, Michael Repacholi

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The present report documents a dialogue between scientists reviewing the currently available scientific evidence with respect to the effects of RF EMF exposure on children. The focus was directed towards a transparent and comprehensible characterization of the findings and conclusions for the evaluation of the relationship between mobile phone communication and children’s health. The now available report, based on the scientific opinions of the experts as well as on a series of workshops, aims to help the public and policy makers to better understand the current state of the scientific evidence as well as implications for the risk evaluation ...


The Relation Of Early Environmental Experience To Shame And Self-Criticism: Psychological Pathways To Depression, Karin Sandquist, B. F. S. Grenyer, Peter Caputi Jan 2009

The Relation Of Early Environmental Experience To Shame And Self-Criticism: Psychological Pathways To Depression, Karin Sandquist, B. F. S. Grenyer, Peter Caputi

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Self-criticism has been identified as a particularly malignant personality variable that confers vulnerability for the development of depression. Although impressive literature on depressive symptoms and the personality variable self-criticism exists, few studies have examined the origins of a self-critical style and little is currently known as to how the self-conscious affect of shame may impact this link. The aim of this study was to test a more comprehensive path model of depressive symptoms. The proposed model suggested that self-criticism originates from a parental style characterised by low parental warmth and high parental control, with self-criticism and shame representing mediating variables ...


Public Attitudes Toward People With Mental Illness In New Zealand, 1995-1996, Nikolaos Kazantzis, Amber Wakefield, Frank P. Deane, Kevin Ronan, Malcolm Johnson Jan 2009

Public Attitudes Toward People With Mental Illness In New Zealand, 1995-1996, Nikolaos Kazantzis, Amber Wakefield, Frank P. Deane, Kevin Ronan, Malcolm Johnson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Archival data from a cross-sectional survey of two cohorts of community residing New Zealand adults (n = 157; n = 141) was analysed to examine social attitudes towards people with mental illness in a historical period associated with the establishment of a community mental health facility. Participants completed the Opinions about Mental Illness (OMI; Cohen & Struening, 1959), and the Comfort in Interaction Scale (CI, Beckwith & Mathews, 1994); the latter a measure of level of prior contact with people with mental illness. Across cohorts, the OMI Mental Hygiene subscale and the CI scale had significant variability. Older participants endorsed more Authoritarian, Social Restrictiveness and Interpersonal Ideology attitudes in their perception of people with mental illness ...


The Effects Of Reason And Event Saliency On Health-Related Decisions, Lisa Woods, Amy Y. Chan Jan 2009

The Effects Of Reason And Event Saliency On Health-Related Decisions, Lisa Woods, Amy Y. Chan

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The current study examined how event saliency and reason for action influence the amount of regret anticipated about a foregone option, and on people‟s anticipated choice of behavior when they are confronted with a choice between two equally aversive options. The participants were 120 undergraduate psychology students. Participants who were prompted to imagine choosing to fulfill an internal desire instead of an internal obligation anticipated significantly more regret than those who were prompted to make the opposite choice. No significant differences in the amount of regret anticipated was found between participants who had to choose between two external obligations ...


Multiple Myeloma; Clinical Update On A Rare And Treatable Cancer, Moira Stephens Jan 2009

Multiple Myeloma; Clinical Update On A Rare And Treatable Cancer, Moira Stephens

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Multiple myeloma is a rare cancer, contributing 1% of cancers and 15% of haematological malignancies. Myeloma is an incurable, yet increasingly treatable cancer with people often living in a chronic (controlled) state of relapse, i.e. living with a low level of disease for many years. Survival with myeloma varies from a few months to decades. Nurses play a valuable role in caring for people with myeloma and with their specialist knowledge of the pathophysiology of myeloma and the effects of treatment, together with their therapeutic relationship with the patient and the family, are in an important position to influence ...