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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2009

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Computer Sciences

Government

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Web 2.0 In The Process Of E-Participation: The Case Of Organizing For America And The Obama Administration, Aysu Kes-Erkul, R. Erdem Erkul Oct 2009

Web 2.0 In The Process Of E-Participation: The Case Of Organizing For America And The Obama Administration, Aysu Kes-Erkul, R. Erdem Erkul

National Center for Digital Government

The presidential campaign of Barack Obama during the 2008 elections sparked new discussion about the public engagement issue in the political processes. The campaign used Web 2.0 tools intensively to reach the general public and seek support and collect feedback from voters. In this paper, we analyze the major website of this project, “Organizing for America” (OFA) from the perspective of e-participation, which is a concept that include all the processes of public involvement via information and communication technologies.


Conference Proceedings, Youtube And The 2008 Election Cycle Apr 2009

Conference Proceedings, Youtube And The 2008 Election Cycle

YouTube and the 2008 Election Cycle in the United States

The YouTube and the 2008 Election Cycle in the United States Conference took place April 16-17, 2009 at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The conference brought together political and computer scientists to explore the electoral impact of user-created YouTube technologies and to demonstrate new technical and analytic opportunities associated with new media technologies and politics. The conference proceedings includes copies of all papers presented at the conference as well as abstracts of all posters and keynote presentations.


The Open Source Software Ecosystem, Charles M. Schweik Jan 2009

The Open Source Software Ecosystem, Charles M. Schweik

National Center for Digital Government

[first paragraph] Open source research in the late 1990s and early 2000's described open source development projects as all-volunteer endeavors without the existence of monetary incentives (Chakravarty, Haruvy and Wu, 2007), and relatively recent empirical studies (Ghosh, 2005; Wolf {{243}}) confirm that a sizable percentage of open source developers are indeed volunteers.1 Open source development projects involving more than one developer were seen to follow a “hacker ethic” (Himanen, 2000; von Hippel and von Krogh, 2003) where individuals freely give away and exchange software they had written so that it could be modified and built upon, with an ...