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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

It Takes A Village: Protecting Rural African American Youth In The Context Of Racism, Cady Berkel, Velma Mcbride Murry, Tera R. Hurt, Yi-Fu Chen, Gene H. Brody, Ronald L. Simons, Carolyn Cutrona, Frederick X. Gibbons Feb 2009

It Takes A Village: Protecting Rural African American Youth In The Context Of Racism, Cady Berkel, Velma Mcbride Murry, Tera R. Hurt, Yi-Fu Chen, Gene H. Brody, Ronald L. Simons, Carolyn Cutrona, Frederick X. Gibbons

Psychology Publications

Prior research demonstrates negative consequences of racism, however, little is known about community, parenting, and intrapersonal mechanisms that protect youth. Using a mixed-methods approach, this study illuminated linkages between positive and negative contextual influences on rural African American adolescent outcomes. Quantitative results provide support for Structural Ecosystems Theory, in that the influence of discrimination and collective socialization on adolescent outcomes was mediated by racial socialization and positive parenting. Parenting and community influences contributed to adolescent racial identity and self image, which protected against common negative responses to racism; including academic underachievement, succumbing to peer pressure, and aggressive tendencies. Qualitative results ...


Upward Mobility: Experiences With Families Of Origin Among College-Educated African American Women, Danielle Jacqueline Simmons Jan 2009

Upward Mobility: Experiences With Families Of Origin Among College-Educated African American Women, Danielle Jacqueline Simmons

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Research indicates that a significant number of African American women from lower-class statuses work hard to become upwardly mobile. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the interpersonal experiences of upwardly mobile African American women, particularly their interactions with their family and community of origin. The purposefully selected sample was composed of 13 African American women holding various positions at a Midwestern university. To maximize variation of experiences, respondents were graduate students, faculty members, and staff. The primary data collection method was in-depth interviews along with examination of supplemental materials which included respondents' journal entries, e-mail exchanges, field ...