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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Engaged Lifestyle, Personality, And Mental Status Among Centenarians, Peter Martin, Joan Baenziger, Maurice Macdonald, Ilene C. Siegler, Leonard W. Poon Dec 2009

Engaged Lifestyle, Personality, And Mental Status Among Centenarians, Peter Martin, Joan Baenziger, Maurice Macdonald, Ilene C. Siegler, Leonard W. Poon

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

This study assessed engaged lifestyle activities (e.g., volunteering, traveling, and public speaking) for centenarians of the Georgia Centenarian Study. A total of 285 centenarians and near-centenarians (i.e., 98 years and older) and their proxy informants participated in this study. The Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was assessed for all centenarians, and proxy informants reported on lifestyle activities and personality traits of the centenarians. Results suggested that participants who had volunteered, traveled, and those who had given public talks and balanced their checkbooks were more likely to show relatively high mental status scores (i.e., MMSE > 17). Personality traits were ...


Evaluation Of A Multiple Ecological Level Child Obesity Prevention Program: Switch®What You Do, View, And Chew, Douglas A. Gentile, Gregory Welk, Joey C. Eisenmann, Rachel A. Reimer, David A. Walsh, Daniel W. Rusell, Randi Callahan, Monica Walsh, Sarah Strickland, Katie Fritz Sep 2009

Evaluation Of A Multiple Ecological Level Child Obesity Prevention Program: Switch®What You Do, View, And Chew, Douglas A. Gentile, Gregory Welk, Joey C. Eisenmann, Rachel A. Reimer, David A. Walsh, Daniel W. Rusell, Randi Callahan, Monica Walsh, Sarah Strickland, Katie Fritz

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

Background: Schools are the most frequent target for intervention programs aimed at preventing child obesity; however, the overall effectiveness of these programs has been limited. It has therefore been recommended that interventions target multiple ecological levels (community, family, school and individual) to have greater success in changing risk behaviors for obesity. This study examined the immediate and short-term, sustained effects of the Switch program, which targeted three behaviors (decreasing children's screen time, increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, and increasing physical activity) at three ecological levels (the family, school, and community).

Methods: Participants were 1,323 children and their parents ...


Parent-Child Relationships, Melinda S. Leidy, Thomas J. Schofield, Ross D. Parke Jun 2009

Parent-Child Relationships, Melinda S. Leidy, Thomas J. Schofield, Ross D. Parke

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

One of the most important and earliest relationships is the parent-child relationship. During infancy, this relationship focuses on the parent responding to the infant's basic needs. Over time, an attachment forms between the parent and child in response to the these day-to-day interactions. During toddlerhood, parents attempt to shape their children's social behaviors. Parents play various roles for their toddlers, including acting as teacher, nurturers, and providers of guidance and affection. Throughout childhood, children become more interested in peers. However, parents continue to influence their children through their parenting styles. In addition, parents serve as providers of social ...


Creating School-Family Partnerships In Adolescence: Challenges And Opportunities, Brenda J. Lohman, Jennifer L. Matjasko Jan 2009

Creating School-Family Partnerships In Adolescence: Challenges And Opportunities, Brenda J. Lohman, Jennifer L. Matjasko

Human Development and Family Studies Publications

Adolescence is a time of rapid change. These changes present challenges and opportunities for developing youth including physical changes, significant cognitive advancements, emotional maturation, and new peer and romantic relationships. For most adolescents, these changes are also accompanied by changes in their environments including more demanding expectations for independence, more challenging academic tasks, and new expectations for social participation from parents and peers. At the same time, adolescents are becoming more independent from their families while also maintaining a sense of connection to them and to their schools.