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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Can Intuition Improve Deception Detection Performance?, Justin S. Albrechtsen, Christian A. Meissner, Kyle J. Susa Jan 2009

Can Intuition Improve Deception Detection Performance?, Justin S. Albrechtsen, Christian A. Meissner, Kyle J. Susa

Christian A. Meissner, Ph.D.

Two studies examined the role of processing style (intuitive vs. deliberative processing) in a deception detection task. In the first experiment, a thin slicing manipulation was used to demonstrate that intuitive processing can lead to more accurate judgments of deception when compared with traditional deliberative forms of processing. In the second experiment, participants who engaged in a secondary (concurrent) task performed more accurately in a deception detection task than participants who were asked to provide a verbal rationale for each decision and those in a control condition. Overall, the results converge to suggest that intuitive processing can significantly improve deception ...


False Confessions, Christian A. Meissner, Allyson J. Horgan, Justin S. Albrechtsen Jan 2009

False Confessions, Christian A. Meissner, Allyson J. Horgan, Justin S. Albrechtsen

Christian A. Meissner, Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Cross-Racial Lineup Identification: The Potential Benefits Of Context Reinstatement, Jacqueline R. Evans, Jessica L. Marcon, Christian A. Meissner Jan 2009

Cross-Racial Lineup Identification: The Potential Benefits Of Context Reinstatement, Jacqueline R. Evans, Jessica L. Marcon, Christian A. Meissner

Christian A. Meissner, Ph.D.

The current research examined the potential benefit of context reinstatement on the cross-race effect in lineup identification. Participants viewed a series of own- and other-race faces and subsequently attempted identification of these faces from target-present and target-absent lineups. The traditional cross-race effect was found on measures of discrimination accuracy and response bias; however, discrimination accuracy across own- and other-race faces was shown to interact with context reinstatement such that only own-race faces benefited from the provision of contextual information. This finding is discussed in light of encoding-based theories of the cross-race effect, and with regard to the theoretical and practical ...


The Need For Expert Psychological Testimony On Eyewitness Identification, Roy S. Malpass, Stephen J. Ross, Christian A. Meissner, Jessica L. Marcon Jan 2009

The Need For Expert Psychological Testimony On Eyewitness Identification, Roy S. Malpass, Stephen J. Ross, Christian A. Meissner, Jessica L. Marcon

Christian A. Meissner, Ph.D.

No abstract provided.